Skip to the page content Skip to primary navigation Skip to the search form Skip to the audience-based navigation Skip to the site tools and log-in Information about website accessibility

Bachelor of Arts in Interpretation: ASL/English

Course Descriptions

1320 American Sign Language I

An elementary course in American Sign Language (ASL) using a natural language approach to introduce culturally appropriate signed concepts related to the immediate environment. Common communicative events and interactions are utilized to acquire a basic working vocabulary and grammar. Includes development of appropriate linguistic/cultural behaviors and awareness of respect for deaf culture. Receptive and expressive skills are fostered through interactive ASL lessons without voice.

1321 American Sign Language II

Prerequisite: INTR 1320 with a grade of C or greater. An intermediate ASL course progressing from common, concrete communicative events and interactions to language usage expressing abstract ideas. Emphasis is on the comprehension and production of increasingly complex linguistic structure focusing on dialogues and conversational expressions. More complex receptive and expressive skills are fostered through interactive ASL lessons without voice.

1340 Deaf Culture

An interdisciplinary study of American Deaf culture and the factors that contribute to defining the Deaf Community as a distinct cultural minority, focusing on an awareness and understanding of cultural diversity and preservation of language. Covers the cultural identity, group norms, rules of social interaction, values, and traditions held by members who are deaf. Societal attitudes regarding deafness and issues such as cultural oppression and language power by the majority culture will be discussed, as well as the contributions of folklore, literature, plays and works of art made by persons who are deaf to the larger American culture and to their own community organizations. The impact of modern technology, emerging issues, trends and advocacy within the Deaf Community are presented. Typically offered Fall Semester only.

2240 Specialized Terminology

Prerequisite: INTR 2320, or permission of program coordinator. Students will acquire skills and vocabulary for communicating in specialized settings such as medical, mental health, legal, rehabilitation, counseling, technical, and religious fields. Emphasis is on acquisition of specific terminology, concepts, and protocol in each area.

2280 Fingerspelling

Prerequisite: INTR 1320. A course designed to develop expressive and receptive fingerspelling skills. Emphasis will be on whole-word and phrase recognition, as well as on reading fingerspelling embedded in signed sentences. Expressive skills will focus on attainment of normal speed, clarity, and fluency. Extensive interaction and drills with the instructor-student(s) will enhance receptive and expressive speed and skill. Videotaped fingerspelling lessons of varying speeds embedded in sentences will be utilized for practice of receptive comprehension.

2320 American Sign Language III

Prerequisite: INTR 1321 with a grade of C or better. This course is a continuation of the Signing Naturally curriculum. Emphasis is on the development of fluent conversational skills utilizing grammatical nonmanual signals and markers. Students will learn how to narrate, describe, compare, and comment. Videotaped narratives of native language users are utilized to build students’ comprehension skills and to review lanaguage features taught in class. Interactive ASL lessons without voice lead to expanded vocabulary mastery and fluency.

2321 American Sign Language IV

Prerequisite: INTR 2320 with a grade of C or better. An advanced ASL performance course integrating cultural and linguistic competencies ranging from informal to formal communication events. Emphasis is on greater fluency in idiomatic language usage and mastery of vocabulary and syntax. Linguistics competence is enhanced through interactive discourse with native language users.

2330 Manually Coded English in Educational Settings

Prerequisite: INTR 1321. Designed to expose students to a variety of signed English systems. Students learn the rules governing the selection of signs and the rationale for sign language systems in the educational setting. Focus is on learning Signing Exact English (SEE II) as adopted by educational systems and state schools for the deaf. Typically offered Fall Semester only.

2344 Comparative Linguistics

Prerequisite: INTR 2320, 2330. This course introduces students to the basic concepts of linguistics: phonology, morphology, syntax, and language use.   Students will compare and contrast the fundamental linguistic structures of American Sign Language and English and learn to think critically about languages and language use.

3320 American Sign Language V

Prerequisite: The completion of an Associate of Science in American Sign Language Studies, and an Intermediate level on the Signed Communication Proficiency Interview (SCPI). Corequisite: INTR 3344. This is an advanced ASL performance course integrating cultural and linguistic competencies ranging from informal to formal communication. Emphasis is on fluency in idiomatic language usage and mastery of vocabulary and syntax. Linguistic competence is enhanced through interactive discourse with native language users.

3344 Interpretation Theory and Process

Prerequisite: The completion of an Associate of Science in American Sign Language Studies, and an Intermediate level on the Signed Communication Proficiency Interview (SCPI). Corequisite: INTR 3320. This course uses a process-oriented approach for applying the essential cognitive strategies to interpretation. These strategies include organizing and manipulating visual images, analyzing message for meaning, and self-monitoring for message accuracy. The course serves as a transition from language learning to beginning interpretation from American Sign Language to English.

3347 Introduction to Interpreting

Prerequisite: The completion of an Associate of Science in American Sign Language Studies. Designed to provide students with a working knowledge of the profession of interpreting, including the Code of Professional Conduct, certification criteria, the roles and responsibilities of an interpreter, and compensation. Discussions of the role of the interpreter in a variety of professional settings including educational, medical, legal, the performing arts, counseling, and rehabilitation.

3350 Artistic Interpreting in Educational Settings

Prerequisite: INTR 2321. Designed to teach students the skills needed to interpret music, prose, poetry, and drama in a visually artistic manner. Emphasizes appropriate use of conceptually accurate signs, facial expression, movement, and rhythm. Enrollment restricted to Interpretation majors. Typically offered Fall Semester only.

3364 Sign to Voice Interpreting/Transliterating

Prerequisites: INTR 3320, 3344, 3346. Designed to develop skills in sign to voice interpreting for persons who are deaf. Students will learn to voice simultaneously and consecutively when viewing videotapes of native signers who use a variety of signing modalities to communicate. Audiotapes will provide students will immediate feedback. Enrollment restricted to Interpretation majors. Typically offered Spring Semester only.

3366 Voice to Sign Interpreting/Transliterating

Prerequisites: INTR 3320, 3344, 3346. Designed to develop interpreting and transliterating skills through the use of interactive videotapes and audiotapes. Students will also learn to select and assess appropriate modality and language levels. Emphasis will be on the process of interpreting and developing fluency, speed, and accuracy. Enrollment restricted to Interpretation majors. Typically offered Spring Semester only.

3380 Introduction to Interpreting Research

Prerequisite: INTR 3320, INTR 2344, or permission of the program coordinator. This course is designed to introduce students to the process of conducting research, quantitative and qualitative methods of data collection and analysis, and the process of reporting research results. Students will learn ethical practices in the conduct of research. Students will critically evaluate research in the fields of sign language linguistics and spoken and sign language interpreting research.

3372 Interpreting for Persons who are Hard of Hearing

Prerequisite: INTR 3347. A study of the mechanics of and skills needed for interpreting for persons who are deaf and hard of hearing and use assistive listening technology, oral transliterating, Cued Speech, or speech to text services. Students will develop and practice appropriate techniques necessary for interpreting for persons who are deaf and hard of hearing, who do not know sign language and who use the above methods for communication.

4330 Interpreting 1

Prerequisite: The completion of INTR 3364, 3366, QAST Level I/I or equivalent interpreting credential. This course is an intermediate level interpreting skills course designed to enhance both linguistic competencies and interpreting skills. This course is divided into four 3-week blocks with each block focusing on a specific topic/setting. Business practices regarding self-employment and record keeping will be infused into each learning block. Students will practice specialized vocabulary, participate in simulated interpreting experiences, apply ethical decision making, tour environments and interact with professionals from targeted settings: medical, VR/employment, social services, religious and business.

4332 Interpreting 2

Prerequisite: INTR 4330, INTR 4370. This course is an advanced level interpreting skills course designed to enhance both linguistic competencies and interpreting skills. This course is divided into four 3-week blocks with each block focusing on a specific topic/setting. Business practices regarding self-employment and record keeping will be infused into each learning block. Students will practice specialized vocabulary, participate in simulated interpreting experiences, apply ethical decision making, tour environments and interact with professionals from targeted settings: video relay and video remote interpreting, government agencies, mental health and legal.

4370 Ethical Standards & Practices for Interpreters

Prerequisites: INTR 3364, 3366 and QAST Level I/I, or permission of Program Director. A course designed to teach and practice a model for ethical decision making within the field of interpretation. Students will study codes from international interpreting organizations, the NAD-RID Code of Professional Conduct, the QAST Code of Ethics, and the Arkansas Code for interpreters in the judiciary. The RID Ethical Practices System will be reviewed. Various interpreting scenarios presenting ethical dilemmas will be discussed and/or role-played applying the Demand Control Theory to the NAD-RID Code of Professional Conduct.

4346 Principles of Educational Interpreting

Prerequisite: Interpretation 3380, QAST Level I/I or equivalent, or permission of program coordinator. Students will discuss issues related to interpreting in classrooms at the elementary, secondary, and postsecondary levels. Students will analyze the major transitions from childhood to adolescence to adulthood and the changes required in professional roles, responsibilities, and ethical decision-making. Topics will include: working with children and adolescents, their parents, and educators; sign systems used in educational settings; educational goals and language policies; certification issues; working conditions; analyzing classroom interpreting tasks; and knowledge, skills, and attitudes needed for educational interpreting.

4358 Interpreting for Persons who are Deaf-Blind

Prerequisites: INTR 3364, INTR 3366, QAST I/I or equivalent. Students will study the major causes of deaf-blindness and the impact of deaf-blindness on communication, mobility and life styles. Emphasis is on learning and practicing the various modes of communication used by persons who are deaf-blind for interpreters and intervenors. Students will become familiar with human guide techniques and the aids and devices available to persons who are deaf-blind. Tactile forms of communication will be emphasized during role play situations. A service-learning component will provide the opportunity to apply classroom knowledge and skills in real life situations, while meeting community need. Reflective discussion and writing is emphasized throughout the course.

4102, 4202, 4302 Workshop

Special topics.

4108, 4208, 4308 Independent Study

Prerequisite: consent of coordinator. Special topics.

4380 Advanced Transliteration: English - English

Prerequisite: INTR 4330, 4370,QAST Level I/I or equivalent, completion of or current enrollment in all prior B.A. degree courses or permission of program coordinator; Co-requisite Interpretation 4382. Continuation of sign to voice and voice to sign transliterating skills development. Course includes practice in appropriate sign/spoken vocabulary selection, the matching of register in the formal setting, and quality voice production. Students will focus on transliterating signed/spoken English in highly technical situations and develop specialized vocabulary in areas typically utilizing transliterators.

4382 Advanced Interpretation: ASL - English

Prerequisite: Interpretation 4330 and 4370, QAST Level I/I or equivalent, completion of or current enrollment in all prior B.A. degree courses; co-requisite INTR 4380. Continuation of the interpretation process between ASL and English including application of process skills, contrastive ASL-English linguistics, contrastive cultural analysis and teaming skills for the consecutive and simultaneous interpretation process. Designed to include practice of requisite skills and process tasks of increased complexity with unplanned and planned language samples, such as dialogues, monologues, interviews, and lectures from a variety of interpreting settings.

4384 Interpreting Academic Subjects

Prerequisites: INTR 4330, INTR 4370, INTR 4346, QAST Level I/I or equivalent, or permission of program coordinator. Acquisition of interpreting/transliterating skills across a variety of academic subjects commonly taught in elementary through postsecondary settings. Emphasis on incorporating and pairing conceptually accurate sign usage within a variety of English-bound sign systems, as well as acquisition of specialized sign vocabulary for academic content areas.

4770 Internship

Prerequisites: Completion of all B.A. requirements. Practical experience in settings such as educational, rehabilitation, community service centers, and agencies serving children, adolescents and/or adults who are deaf or hard of hearing. Designed to provide students with the opportunity to synthesize practical and academic experiences gained during the in-residence portion of the program. The site, supervision, and plan of activity will be mutually agreed upon by student and instructor before the semester begins.

Updated 8.26.2014