Criminal Justice

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Admissions | Program Requirements | Graduate Courses

Ross Hall, Room 417, (501) 569-3195, Website

Master of Arts and Master of Science

The Criminal Justice Department offers two master’s degrees in criminal justice, both a Master of Arts and a Master of Science.

Master of Arts in Criminal Justice

The Master of Arts in Criminal Justice program prepares graduates for positions of responsibility in the criminal justice system and related areas, facilitates the professional and intellectual development of in- service students, and provides foundation work for those planning careers in research or teaching. The curriculum provides a distinctive melding of professionally structured knowledge and the ethical imperatives of criminal justice in a constitutional democracy. Attention is centered on:

  • Understanding the broadest nature of scientific inquiry and dissemination of social science knowledge pertaining to criminal justice;
  • The ability to organize literature, think critically, and draw conclusions from conducting independent research into criminal justice topics. Understanding of police, courts, corrections, prosecution agencies, and the criminal – legal profession as integral components of the criminal justice system;
  • Knowledge of research and research methodologies needed to understand and improve criminal justice and criminology; and
  • Understanding of criminological theories for studying issues of crime and behavior.

For more information, visit the program’s website.

Admission Requirements

Admissions decisions are made based on a total file review. Expectations of those applying include the following:

  • Baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution with a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.75 (4.0 scale)
  • Score of at least 400 on the Miller Analogies Test or 300 on the combine verbal and analytical sections of the Graduate Record Examination
  • An undergraduate statistics and undergraduate research methods course.
  • An oral interview with the program coordinator may be required.

Program Requirements

Two options are available for graduation from the MACJ program: thesis and portfolio. Both options require 36 hours to successfully complete the program including CRJU 8301 Thesis / Portfolio Prep and 8303 Thesis / Portfolio. Both thesis and portfolios require an oral defense. Before enrolling in graduate classes, students must consult with the program coordinator to develop a program of study.

The thesis requires research and analysis of a topic in the field. It must demonstrate advanced scholarship, appropriate design, and skills of written expression. A total of 6 hours of CRJU 8303 and CRJU 8301 must be completed.

The portfolio requires a comprehensive literature review, critique of the literature, and direction for future study and policy on the topic. A total of six hours of CRJU 8303 and CRJU 8301 must be completed. Electives may be taken from criminal justice or from education, gerontology, history, applied communication studies, journalism, psychology, public administration, social work, and technical and professional writing.

Courses with grades of B or greater may not be repeated; grades below C are not accepted in the minimum hours requirement; and courses cannot be dropped from the study plan because of low grades. Students may receive a maximum of two Cs in the program of study. Upon receiving a third C, the student will be removed from the program. Conditional students must earn grades of at least B in the first 12 hours and may not receive a grade of incomplete (I).

Suggested Degree Plan

Fall First Year

CRJU 7301 Pro-seminar
CRJU 7300 Criminological Theory
CRJU 7392 Research Methods

Spring First Year

CRJU 7391 Social Statistics
CRJU 7305 Seminar in Criminal Law
CRJU 7322 Foundations of Policing

Fall Second Year

CRJU 7370 Juvenile Delinquency Problems
Elective 1
Elective 2

Spring Second Year

CRJU 7340 Correctional Administration
CRJU 8301 Portfolio / Thesis Preparation
CRJU 8303 Thesis / Portfolio

Graduate Assistantships

A limited number of graduate assistantships are available. Contact the program coordinator for information.

Graduation Requirements

  • Cumulative GPA of at least 3.0 on an approved program of study as outlined above.
  • Successfully complete a written thesis with oral defense or portfolio with oral defense.
  • Students who do not attain a 3.0 GPA within the required hours may complete no more than six additional hours to achieve the GPA.

Master of Science in Criminal Justice

The Master of Science in Criminal Justice (MSCJ) is designed to develop the essential knowledge and skills needed to become an effective practitioner or supervisor within the criminal justice system. The MSCJ provides students with advanced academic training, special expertise in advanced issues within the criminal justice system, supervisory and administrative proficiency, and the methodological and statistical skills necessary to understand research and new developments in criminal justice. The program increases abilities in critical thinking, problem solving, oral and written communication, and understanding of the criminal justice system in the U.S. It presents an integrated program of study that is academically rigorous and practically oriented. It is appropriate for students who:

  • are currently working in the criminal justice system and seeking to move into higher supervisory roles;
  • are currently working in the criminal justice system and seeking to broaden their skills by obtaining job-related knowledge and expertise.

Students will be guided through an intense, supervised course of study of the history and current issues in criminal justice, criminal justice policies and practices, and ways to improve those practices. This program also requires work in qualitative and quantitative methodologies, statistical analysis, and research design sufficient to make graduates proficient in consuming and understanding research that may be needed in management positions.

All course work builds toward a policy thesis, which demonstrates an understanding of a criminal justice issue and the policy implications of that issue. Graduates of this program will be expected to continue their work in the criminal justice field, be prepared to handle increasing responsibilities in their jobs, and gain promotions to the highest levels of their organizations. The program is offered fully online and is built around 8 week courses each term throughout the year.

For more information, visit the program’s website.

Admission Requirements

Application requirements for admission to the MSCJ program are:

  • A baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution is required.
  • Cumulative grade point average must be at least 2.75 (4.0 scale).
  • Applicants are required to score at least 145 on the verbal and 140 quantitative portions of the GRE, and 3.0 on the writing; or score at least 400 on the Miller Analogies Test.
  • Conditional admissions are possible for low test scores but not low GPA requirements. Conditional admissions will be determined by the MSCJ Graduate Coordinator in consultation with the Graduate School.

The MSCJ program is designed for people currently working in the criminal justice system or closely related fields. Applicants not currently working in the criminal justice system may be accepted but only if enrollment limits are not exceeded by applicants currently working in the field.

Students should submit all undergraduate transcripts and other materials to the UALR Graduate School. Do not send materials to the Department of Criminal Justice. Students not meeting the standardized test score requirements may be admitted conditionally at the discretion of the program coordinator. Students admitted conditionally must earn grades of at least B in the first 12 hours and may not receive a grade of (I) incomplete within the first 12 hours of the program.

MSCJ Admissions Process

    • Complete online (apply.ualr.edu) application. An application fee of $40 will be assessed.
    • Mail official transcripts from undergraduate institution and copies of MAT or GRE score.

Graduate School
2801 S. University Avenue
University of Arkansas at Little Rock
Little Rock, AR 72204-1099

International Students

International students may apply. They should follow the steps at ualr.edu/gradschool/index.php/home/international-students/

Program Requirements

To graduate, students must complete a capstone. Required courses establish the foundation of knowledge in criminal justice and include information all students should possess when they graduate. Students can expect to take a maximum of 3 hours each term. The program will typically take 2 years to complete if the student attends each of the 6 terms during the year. The MSCJ program is delivered entirely online. Lectures may take the form of material presented by the professor (text, Power Point, etc.), guided lectures with voice-over visual material, or video presentations students download and watch. Students will be required to participate in courses through presentations and discussions on the class discussion list. Students will also be required to complete writing assignments associated with the course, ranging from short concept papers to more extensive term papers.

The capstone project requires a comprehensive literature review, critique of the literature, and direction for future study and policy on the topic.

Electives may be taken from criminal justice or from education, gerontology, history, applied communication studies, journalism, psychology, public administration, social work, and professional and technical writing.

Courses with grades of B or greater may not be repeated; grades below C are not accepted towards graduation and courses cannot be dropped from the study plan because of low grades. Conditional students must earn grades of at least B in the first 12 hours and may not receive a grade of incomplete (I).

Required Core Courses (27 hours)

CRJU 7301 Pro-seminar
CRJU 7321 Criminal Justice Organizations and Management
CRJU 7320 Applied Research and Analysis
CRJU 7323 Ethics in Criminal Justice
CRJU 7305 Criminal Law
CRJU 7304 Criminal Justice Policy
CRJU 8303 Thesis

Electives

CRJU 7322 Foundations of Policing
CRJU 7340 Corrections Administration
CRJU 7370 Juvenile Delinquency Problems
CRJU 7390 Independent Study
CRJU 7393 Special Topics (May be repeated for credit)

Degree Plan

Please consult with the CRJU-MS graduate coordinator.


Doctor of Philosophy in Criminal Justice

Students in the Ph.D. program in Criminal Justice are guided through an intense, supervised course of study of history, current issues, and research related to criminology and criminal justice. This program requires extensive work in qualitative and quantitative methods, statistical analysis, and research design. The program provides students an understanding of the value of research. Students will be trained to be prolific writers and skilled at obtaining grants. Coursework and mentoring will provide students with other aspects of professional development, including teaching and pedagogy, services to the discipline, and program administration.

The curriculum consists of 57 graduate semester hours beyond the master’s degree. These hours are divided into five sections:

  1. research design and statistical analysis,
  2. crime and justice,
  3. electives and specialization,
  4. research practicum, and
  5. dissertation.

The courses combine to produce students who have mastered the theories of crime and justice and who have acquired research and statistical techniques sufficient for high levels of analysis and evaluation. All courses will be taught in the classroom or in consultation with individual faculty; none will be taught on-line.

Admission Requirements

Admissions decisions into the doctoral program will be made based on a total file review. Application must meet all admissions standards of the UALR Graduate School. Students will only be admitted in the fall semester each year.

The following criteria are recommended for successful candidates for admissions:

  • score at least 300 on the combined verbal and quantitative portions of the new Graduate Record Exam (GRE) or 1000 on the old test, and at least 4 on the written portion of the GRE.
  • have a cumulative GPA in their master’s program of at least 3.5.
  • score at least 300 on the combined verbal and quantitative portions of the new Graduate Record Exam (GRE) or 1000 on the old test, and at least 4 on the written portion of the GRE.
  • have a cumulative GPA in their master’s program of at least 3.5.

International students must take the TOEFL exam and score 550 on the paper-based test, 213 on the computer-based version or a 79 on the Internet-based version.

Admissions to the doctoral program will require either a master’s degree in criminology/criminal justice, or closely related field, or substantial progress (defined specifically below) toward completing a master’s degree. Students who are admitted from relevant master’s programs at universities other that UALR, but who have not completed their master’s thesis may be admitted as regular admits, but will be required to complete their thesis within one year of joining the Ph.D. program. If a student fails to complete the thesis in that period of time, the student will be suspended from enrolling in Ph.D. courses until the thesis is completed. These students must have completed all required course work and have only the thesis to complete. Students who want to enter the Ph.D. program directly from an undergraduate program must first apply to the M.A. in Criminal Justice. After a student has completed a minimum of 21 hours in the M.A. program, that student may transfer to the Ph.D. program with approval of the doctoral coordinator. In such cases, students who fail to complete the Ph.D. program will be awarded an M.A. degree after successful completion of 36 credit hours and a written project with oral defense. Students who successfully complete all requirements for the Ph.D. will be awarded both an M.A. and a Ph.D. The first three chapters of their dissertation will be considered completion of their thesis. Applicants with only a Juris Doctorate (no master’s degree) will not be directly admitted to the program but will be required to take the MACJ courses in research methods, statistics, and criminal justice (police, corrections, criminological theory).

Applicants must submit official copies of their transcripts and GRE scores to the UALR Graduate School.

Applicants must also submit a statement of purpose and a career development plan. The statement of purpose should consist of two parts: a statement of what the applicant sees as the role of Ph.D. in criminal justice, and a statement of the applicant’s understanding of the role of research in criminal justice. The career development plan should describe in detail what the applicant plans to do following completion of the Ph.D. This statement must be more than “I want to work as a teacher at a university,” and should include a potential research and publication agenda.

Applicants will also be required to submit a writing sample to be considered by the admissions committee.

Finally, two professional letters of recommendation (one of which must come from a graduate-level teacher) are required.

Admission decisions will be made by a committee of doctoral faculty. The doctoral admissions committee will also take the “fit” between the applicant and the doctoral program into account when making admission decisions, and may decline to admit an otherwise qualified applicant based on lack of fit with the program. The doctoral admissions committee may conditionally admit a student for one semester who does not meet all of the requirements for admission. Such students will be evaluated by the doctoral admissions committee after one semester and a decision made to:

  • continue conditional status,
  • grant full admission to the doctoral program, or
  • dismiss the student from the doctoral program.

Student Advising

The Doctoral Coordinator will be the primary contact person for all Ph.D. students. The Doctoral Coordinator will be available during the summer semesters, as well as available during evening hours at selected times to facilitate communication with all students.

At the end of the first semester and at the end of the first year, all doctoral students will meet individually with the Doctoral Coordinator. The meeting will involve performance in the program. The Doctoral Coordinator will obtain information from each course instructor of the student, from the student’s assistantship advisor, and from any faculty who wish to make input. The meeting will address the strengths of the student and point out areas the student needs to strengthen. The result of the meeting will be a determination whether the student will be retained in the program or dismissed.

Financial Assistance

All full-time doctoral students will receive some form of financial assistance. Fellowships will be awarded in the amount of $19,000 and will also cover tuition (fees will not be covered in fellowships/assistantships). Assistantships will be awarded in the amount of $15,000 and will cover tuition. Efforts are made by the program to provide some type of financial support to all full-time doctoral students. Any funding decision, however, is dependent upon the availability of funds. It is expected first year doctoral students will primarily conduct research. In the second year (and subsequent years), doctoral students may be Research Assistants or Teaching Assistants with one or two of their own classes.

Coursework

The program will include both day and night classes. Some of the classes specifically for doctoral students will be taught during the day. Courses that doctoral / master’s may be taught at night. There is a residency requirement of full – time status (9 hours) for two, consecutive full term semesters.

Research Design and Statistical Analysis Course (15 hours)

Courses in research and statistics are designed to produce an ability to frame issues and relevant research questions related to the study of crime and justice, to select the most appropriate statistical techniques, and to properly interpret the results.

Students must take a minimum of 15 hours from the following list of courses:

CRJU 7391 Social Statistics
CRJU 7392 Research Methods in Criminal Justice & Criminology
CRJU 8312 Secondary Data Set Management
CRJU 8315 Multivariate Statistics
CRJU 8314 Mixed Methodologies

Other statistics and/or methods classes offered at the university and agreed upon by the program coordinator

Crime and Justice Courses (12 hours)

Courses include specific or advanced topics on crime and justice. Students are expected to have some knowledge of theories of criminology and crime justice before entering the doctoral program. These courses will build on that knowledge to provide expertise in the core areas related to criminal justice (police, courts, corrections, and criminological theory). Students must select Proseminar and 9 hours from the following courses:

CRJU 8310 Proseminar
CRJU 7300 Criminological Theory
CRJU 8313 Advanced Criminological Theory
CRJU 8321 Teaching Practicum

Students my also take courses from CRJU 7393, Special Topics to fulfill this requirement.

Elective Courses (9 hours)

Students may take one of three specialization areas or may form a topical specialization with the approval of the dissertation committee and Doctoral Coordinator.

The three specialization areas are policing, corrections, and crime related to the environment. The specialization areas are designed to give students more in-depth knowledge in a particular content area of criminal justice and criminology. The specialization in policing will examine theories, practices, and policies related to the historical development and current practices of police. The specialization in corrections will examine correctional theory both of institutional corrections and community based corrections.
The specialization in crime related to the environment of neighborhoods and cities will prepare students to conduct research on crime in metropolitan areas, including the mobility and interaction of residents; urban design in preventing crime; and the relationship between social, physical, and economic networks and crime.

Students selecting this specialization will take the all of the courses from the Criminology Core and then take 6 hours in their specialization area. All students will take the teaching practicum.. Students must take 6 hours from the following courses:

CRJU 7322 Foundations of Policing
CRJU 7340 Correctional Administration
CRJU 8331 Urban Spatial Structures
CRJU 8332 Theories of Neighborhoods and Crime
CRJU 8373 Critical Issues in Criminology
CRJU 8383, Research Practicum (12 hours):
Practicum

Research Practicum is the point in the program where students begin to put their coursework and skills in criminal justice, research design, and statistical analysis into practice.
Dissertation:
CRJU 8393, Dissertation (12 hours):

Upon reaching candidacy status, students may enroll in dissertation hours and begin work on the dissertation. The dissertation will be guided by the student’s dissertation committee. The dissertation committee will be composed of a chair, two members of the doctoral staff, and an outside reader. The outside reader may be a faculty member with graduate faculty status from UALR, or may be a faculty member from another institution. The outside reader will serve in an advisory capacity only and will not vote on the prospectus or final defense of the dissertation. Successful completion of the dissertation will require an oral proposal defense, where the student will defend his or her topic and methods, and a final defense, where the student will defend his or her finding and conclusions. Policies and procedures for passing, failing, and repeating the dissertation defense will be in compliance with the UALR Graduate School.

Comprehensive Examinations and Dissertation

All Ph.D. students are required to take comprehensive examinations. The comprehensive examinations are designed to test the ability of the student to undertake independent research in a particular area and publish the results.

Examining Committee

Each year, an examining committee will be established for the incoming cohort of Ph.D. Students. This committee will be recommended by the doctoral coordinator. The examining committee will be the body that reviews the comprehensive exams for all students in that cohort. This body will serve until all members of that cohort have completed the examination process, recognizing that members of the cohort will complete the process at differing times.
Students will complete one publishable quality paper for presentation to the examining committee. This paper must be completed independently and cannot have significant faculty input. Some of the work may be completed as part of course work; but the majority of the comprehensive exam must be original work, self directed by the student.

At a minimum, the comprehensive exam must contain an Introduction, Problem Statement, Research Question, Methods, Finding, and Conclusions. The methods and analysis must be quantitative, qualitative, or mixed methods and must present results sufficient to warrant publication in a journal. It must be written in Chicago Citation Style and be polished without significant grammatical errors.

Students will deliver comps to the graduate coordinator who will submit them to the committee for blind review. Once the paper has been passed by the committee, the student is then free, and encouraged, to work with a faculty member to get the work published. Results of the examining committee will be one of the following:

      a. pass,

 

      b. revise and resubmit, or

 

    c. fail

If a student receives a revise and resubmit, that student will have a timeline determined by the examining committee to get the paper returned for reconsideration. If the paper is not returned within that period of time, the outcome will be changed to a fail and the student will be dismissed from the program. Students are allowed a maximum of 2 revise and resubmit decisions. If the paper is not acceptable on the third version of the comprehensive exam, the outcome will be changed to a fail and the student will be dismissed from the program. Any student who receives the decision of “fail” will be dismissed from the program.

Upon successful completion of the comprehensive examinations, the student will be advanced to candidacy. Each student will also complete a dissertation of sufficient scholarly nature to contribute to the field of criminology/criminal justice. The dissertation will be guided by the student’s dissertation committee.

Dissertation Committee

Before choosing a topic for dissertation, students must choose a dissertation committee. The Chair of the committee must be a member of doctoral faculty in the Department of Criminal Justice as defined in the governance document. At a minimum, committee members must hold a Ph.D. in the field, teach doctoral classes at UALR, hold graduate faculty status as defined by the UALR Graduate School, and be research active as defined in the governance document.

Dissertation committee members must participate in the lecture series, be available during the summer, and be active in conducting and publishing research in the discipline. In addition to the Chair, the committee must be comprised of at least one statistician or methodologist. One member should be a content specialist. The outside reader may be a faculty member with graduate faculty status from UALR, or may be a faculty member from another institution. The outside reader will serve in an advisory capacity only and will not vote on the prospectus or final defense of the dissertation.
Successful completion of the dissertation will require an oral proposal defense, where the student will defend his or her topic and methods, and a final defense, where the student will defend his or her findings and conclusions. Defenses are advertised and open to the entire UALR community. Policies and procedures for passing, failing, and repeating the dissertation defense will be in compliance with the UALR Graduate School.

If a student fails comprehensive exams, he or she will be allowed one retake. Failure on the retake will result in dismissal from the program; but students may petition for one additional attempt. No attempts beyond the third will be allowed.


Courses in Criminal Justice

CRJU 5300 Crime and Behavior
Contemporary criminological theories of factors contributing to crime and social disorder.

CRJU 5301 Judicial Process and Behavior
Literature on topics such as judicial selection, impact of court decisions, court procedure, factors affecting decision-making behavior of judges.

CRJU 5302 Law and Society
Role of law in modern society; emphasis on legal theories shaping U.S. legal system, theories of justice, legal reasoning, and application of these theories to real-world problems as introduction to the role of law in helping settle social conflicts.

CRJU 5380 Comparative Criminal Justice Systems
Law enforcement, judicial, correctional systems of other nations; emphasis on comparison with U.S.

CRJU 7300 Criminological Theory
Original works of criminological theorists from biological, psychological, sociological, and political perspectives; empirical, methodological adequacy of theories and literature; current application as viable explanation of criminal behavior.

CRJU 7301 Pro-seminar
A critical examination of the theoretical, methodological, and policy issues in criminal justice and criminology. Explores organized knowledge about enduring theoretical and policy questions concerning crime and justice; examines the theoretical foundations of crime control, the relationship between criminal justice agencies, and the relationship between the criminal justice system and its social, political, and economic environments. Also provides students with an overview of criminal justice in higher education and requirements of a graduate education.

CRJU 7303 Criminal Justice Systems
This course will discuss the major functional components of the criminal justice system from the historical, philosophical and system perspectives. It will analyze the interrelationships among components, and identify the impact of social and political forces on roles and functions of criminal justice agencies.

CRJU 7304 Criminal Justice Policy
This course is designed to prepare students to understand and influence policy issues in criminal justice. The course will build upon the CJ systems course to provide a base of knowledge in policy analysis, policy research, and working within the system for policy change. This course will be specific to criminal justice policy issues, and will prepare students to complete their public policy thesis.

CRJU 7305 Seminar in Criminal Law
Major concepts of criminal law; includes various states’ approaches to definitions of crimes, criminal responsibility, criminal defenses.

CRJU 7320 Applied Research and Analysis
Examines the major concepts, techniques, and application of statistical methods in criminal justice. Topics include understanding when statistical techniques are appropriate, interpretation of results, organization and presentation of numerical information, and introduction to descriptive statistics.

CRJU 7321 Criminal Justice Organizations and Management
An overview of major theories of criminal justice organizations and management. The course will center on police and correctional organizations but may be applied to any criminal justice organization. Among the topics studies are leadership, personnel, organizational and political environments, and organizational development.

CRJU 7322 Foundations of Policing
Specific aspects of American police agencies’ organizational patterns, administrative problems, community issues, internal role systems.

CRJU 7323 Ethics in Criminal Justice
Overview of ethical theory, doctrines, and controversies in the field of criminal justice. Emphasis is placed on the dilemmas faced by criminal justice practitioners and supervisors seeking to make appropriate ethical judgments and decisions that are in keeping with the goals of justice.

CRJU 7324 Human Resource Management
A number of recent developments, including demographic changes in the labor force increased global competition, experiments with new organizational arrangements, and public policy attention to work force issues have made human resource management increasingly important for law enforcement and correctional managers. This course will cover a broad range of topics associated with HR management specific to the domain of law enforcement and corrections from differing perspectives. Topics covered will include recruiting/selection of employees; training, motivation, and evaluation; retention; discipline and termination; EEO; policy development, and implementation; legal issues and civil liability.

CRJU 7325 Cyber Crime and Information Systems Security
Provides a foundation for the use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) in analyzing data and making policy decisions. Topics include the use of GIS as a visual representation of demographic and infrastructure data, using GIS to summarize information, and use of GIS computer software.

CRJU 7326 Public Budgeting
Budgeting touches every aspect of the public sector, demanding that anyone concerned with policy making and implementation understand how the process works. This class covers the terminology, components, practices, documents and methods of public budgeting and finance at all levels of government and in the non-profit world. Among other things, students will gain an understanding of the budget process, prepare basic budgets, practice using budge documents to do analysis, learn how to evaluate an organization’s finances using financial reports, and write a financial analysis.

CRJU 7331 Community-Based Corrections
Traditional correctional functions; emphasis on development of community diversion and residential programs, involvement of correctional programs in the community.

CRJU 7340 Correctional Administration
Problems with control and treatment of offenders in institutional correctional settings.

CRJU 7341 Teaching Practicum
Prepares students to teach criminology/criminal justice courses. Covers aspects of presentation, pedagogical issues, giving and grading tests, and handling problem students. Also addressed will be expectations and activities involved in being a faculty member.

CRJU 7360 Deviant Behavior
See Psychology 7360.

CRJU 7361 Social Psychology
See Psychology 7361.

CRJU 7370 Juvenile Delinquency Problems
Topics related to juvenile delinquency and prevention in the juvenile justice system.

CRJU 7390 Independent Study
Prerequisites: graduate standing, consent of program coordinator. Intensive research under faculty supervision or practical experience in a selected criminal justice agency. Requires completion of a research paper.

CRJU 7391 Social Statistics
Logic, uses of statistical analysis in social science research; focus on statistical design of research projects, analysis of computer-generated output, statistical procedures and results; critique of statistical adequacy of related literature.

CRJU 7392 Research Methods in Criminal Justice and Criminology
Methods and techniques of research in the behavioral sciences. Includes an in-depth analysis of the conceptualization of research and the design of appropriate research strategies. Topics covered include experimental design, questionnaire construction, observational techniques, and qualitative research designs.

CRJU 7393 Seminar on Special Topics in Criminal Justice
Crucial criminal justice topic determined by student interest, available faculty resources; emphasis on exhaustive analysis of literature in the subject area.

CRJU 8193 Dissertation
Requires consent of advisor. Students will work with advisory committee to complete dissertation.

CRJU 8301 Portfolio Preparation
The portfolio will consist of a comprehensive literature review on a topic of interest to the student which is to be selected in consultation with a graduate review committee. The portfolio will include a critique of the relevant literature, including any conflicts that exist in previous research, and direction for future research on the topic. The portfolio must be approved by the student’s graduate review committee. Students are expected to provide an oral presentation on the portfolio to the committee.

CRJU 8302 Policy Portfolio Preparation
This course will facilitate completion of the policy portfolio needed for graduation from the policy track of the MACJ program. Topics covered in this course include review of the literature, to include cases and laws; gathering policies, mandates, and legislation on the topic; research concerning policies of agencies, and qualitative / quantitative research methodologies. the product of the course will be a complete policy portfolio.

CRJU 8303 Thesis
Independent investigation demonstrating knowledge and methods of scholarship and culminating in a written thesis with oral defense. Variable credit of one to three hours.

CRJU 8310 Doctoral Proseminar
Provides a foundation for the study of crime and justice and an introduction to the role of Ph.D.s in criminology/criminal justice. Topics include current trends in higher education, employment and career planning, and the role of academics in reducing crime. The course will also serve as an introduction to the doctoral program and writing refresher for incoming doctoral students.

CRJU 8311 Survey of Theories of Justice
Addresses the theoretical foundation of the justice system in the U.S. Topics include theories related to policing, law, corrections, and juvenile justice. This course provides a foundation for the advanced studies of topics in other courses in the doctoral program.

CRJU 8312 Secondary Data Set Management
Provides an understanding of secondary data sets and how they can be used in analyses and program evaluation. Topics include data cleaning for accuracy and efficiency, recording variables, and preparing data sets for analysis with SPSS.

CRJU 8313 Advanced Criminological Theory
Current works in criminological theory. Addresses updates of classical criminological theories as well as theories and research within the previous ten years.

CRJU 8314 Mixed Methodology
The course provides instruction in advanced methodologies of criminal justice and criminological research. Students will be exposed to a variety of qualitative techniques in addition to quantitative techniques of research methods. CRJU 7392 should be completed prior to taking this class. Enrollment in this course is restricted to students enrolled in the Ph.D. in Criminal Justice. Students from outside the CRJU Ph.D. program who wish to enroll must have permission of the Criminal Justice graduate coordinator and the professor of records.

CRJU 8315 Multivariate Statistics
This course provides instruction in advanced multivariate statistical application. CRJU 7391 should be completed prior to taking this class.

CRJU 8331 Urban Spatial Structures
Provides an understanding of American cities, how they have changed over time, and how the spacio-temporal characteristics influence criminal behavior.

CRJU 8332 Theories of Neighborhoods and Crime
The goal of the course is to provide a comprehensive theoretical background upon which to conduct research on neighborhoods and crime.

CRJU 8333, Theory and Practice of Spatial Analysis
Advanced analysis of data related to crime in the urban environment. Topics include using Spatial Analyst, CrimeStat III, and other spatial statistics. Theories of neighborhoods and crime will be tested using data on crime and social dynamics.

CRJU 8373 Critical Issues in Criminology
This course is designed to provide in-depth readings on topical subjects that are pertinent to student’s concentration area. Students will be provided with a readings list and will be required to demonstrate analysis of information from that list in the form of papers, presentations, and special topic discussions.

CRJU 8383 Research Practicum
Course goals are to: 1) give students experience in writing grant proposals and obtain funding, 2) give students experience in designing research and putting research in practice, 3) give students practical experience in conducting research, and 4) build on student knowledge in analysis and research in preparation for completing their dissertation.

CRJU 8393 Dissertation
Requires consent of advisor. Students work with advisory committee to complete dissertation.

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