Four-letter Course Codes-Undergraduate

The following is a listing of all undergraduate course codes. Click on the four-letter code to review the undergraduate courses within that discipline.

Graduate courses are found within the Graduate Catalog, Clinton School of Public Service Website, and the Law School Website.

ACCT – Accounting

ACCT 2310 Principles of Accounting I
Prerequisite: MGMT 1310 or CPSC 1370 or equivalent, and MATH 1302. Introduction to the field of accounting, fundamentals of financial accounting, recording, summarizing, and reporting cycle. Principles of asset valuation and income measurement; accounting systems and internal controls. Three credit hours. (ACTS Course Number ACCT 2003)

ACCT 2330 Principles of Accounting II
Prerequisite: ACCT 2310; MATH 1302; and MGMT 1310 or CPSC 1370 or equivalent. Note: A grade of C or higher is required in ACCT 2310 and ACCT 2330 to register in any higher level Accounting course. Continuation of ACCT 2310. Reporting for external investors. Management accounting and decision making. Three credit hours. (ACTS Course Number ACCT 2013)

ACCT 3311 Intermediate Financial Accounting I
Prerequisites: ACCT 2310 and ACCT 2330, each with a grade of C or greater; MATH 1302; and MGMT 1310 or CPSC 1370 or equivalent. Conceptual and historical framework underlying contemporary accounting and financial reporting; form and content of financial statements; revenue recognition; present value mathematics in accounting; measuring and reporting for cash and receivables; inventories; property, plant, and equipment. Three credit hours.

ACCT 3312 Intermediate Financial Accounting II
Prerequisite: ACCT 2310, ACCT 2330, and ACCT 3311, each with a grade of C or greater. Continuation of financial accounting. Measuring and reporting, current liabilities and contingencies, long-term liabilities, stockholders equity, income taxes, pensions, leases, cash flows, and special revenue recognition situations. Three credit hours.

ACCT 3321 Federal Taxation I
Prerequisite: ACCT 2310 and ACCT 2330 with C or greater or consent of the instructor. Introduction to federal income taxation, with emphasis on personal business and investment income and deductions, property transactions, and other topics related to taxation of individuals. Three credit hours.

ACCT 3330 Intermediate Cost and Managerial Accounting I
Prerequisites: ACCT 2310, ACCT 2330, and ECON 3355, each with a grade of C or greater; MATH 1302; MGMT 1310 or CPSC 1370. Conceptual framework for managerial accounting, measurement and reporting of cost information, including historical and standard cost systems, cost behavior analysis, budgeting, variance analysis, responsibility accounting, performance measurement, and management control systems. Three credit hours.

ACCT 3341 Accounting Information Systems
Prerequisite: ACCT 2310, ACCT 2330, and ACCT 3311, each with a grade of C or greater. Review of the evolution of accounting systems from manual systems to advanced automated systems, with emphasis on processing requirements and the EDP tools used in the automation of information systems; study of the internal control needs of accounting systems, both manual and EDP; microcomputer-based projects. Three credit hours.

ACCT 3361 Accounting for Governments, Not-for-Profits, and Other Financial Issues
Prerequisite: ACCT 3311 with C or greater. Fund accounting for governmental and not-for-profit entities. Financial and budgetary control, the budgetary process in government, special accounting, and reporting problems of the public and not-for-profit sector. Three credit hours.

ACCT 3391 Cooperative Education in Accounting
Prerequisites: ACCT 2310, ACCT 2330, and ACCT 3311, each with a grade of C or greater, but concurrent enrollment in ACCT 3311 permitted; major in Accounting; junior standing; GPA of 3.0 or higher in all work completed; consent of Department Chair prior to registration. Provides experience in an organizational setting designed to integrate accounting theory and practice. A written project, designed in consultation with the faculty member, and a minimum of 200 hours working for a participating employer during a semester are required. The exact activities and responsibilities related to the work experience must be specified in written agreements between the student, faculty member, employer, and the Office of Cooperative Education. Course is offered on a credit/no credit basis only, with credit being equivalent to C or greater performance. Three credit hours.

ACCT 4199, 4299, 4399 Independent Study
Prerequisites: Senior standing, consent of instructor. Independent investigation under faculty supervision of topics not offered in regular courses. Two or three credit hours.

ACCT 4311 Accounting Issues
Prerequisites: ACCT 2310, ACCT 2330, ACCT 3311, ACCT 3312, ACCT 3321, ACCT 3330, ACCT 3341, ACCT 3361, ACCT 4314, and ACCT 4351, each with a grade of C or greater. However, concurrent enrollment in ACCT 3321, ACCT 3361, ACCT 4314, and ACCT 4351 permitted. This is the capstone course for the undergraduate accounting major. Topics to be covered include career planning, professional certifications, ethical standards for accountants and emerging issues for the accounting profession. Accounting program assessment is done in this course.

ACCT 4314 Advanced Financial Accounting
Prerequisite: ACCT 3312 with C or greater. Accounting for temporary and long-term investments, business combinations, consolidated financial reporting, and international operations. Three credit hours.

ACCT 4316 International Accounting
Prerequisite: ACCT 2310, ACCT 2330, ACCT 3311, ACCT 3312, and ACCT 4314, each with a grade of C or greater. This course examines international financial reporting developments, procedures, and standards (IFRS) with an emphasis on the convergence of US GAAP and International Financial Reporting Standards. Attention is also given to the financial reporting requirements of multinational enterprises operating in a global environment. Three credit hours.

ACCT 4322 Federal Taxation II
Prerequisite: ACCT 3321 with C or greater. Federal income tax topics related to partnerships and partners, corporations and shareholders, trusts and estates, research methods in tax practice, survey of the unified estate and gift tax law. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as ACCT 5322. Three credit hours.

ACCT 4323 Research in Federal Taxation
Prerequisite: ACCT 3321 with C or greater. Methods and tools of tax research as applied to both closed fact and controllable fact cases. Methods for locating and assessing relevant authority on specific tax questions is emphasized. Three credit hours.

ACCT 4351 Auditing Theory and Practice I
Prerequisites: ACCT 2310, ACCT 2330, ACCT 3311, ACCT 3312, ACCT 3330, and ACCT 3341, each with C or greater. Nature, history, and social role of auditing. Fundamentals of contemporary auditing theory and practice with emphasis on collection and evaluation of audit evidence and the audit report. Introduction to operations auditing, statistical sampling, and auditing EDP systems. Three credit hours.

ACCT 4366 Federal Corporate Taxation
Prerequisite: ACCT 3321 – ACCT 2310, ACCT 2330, ACCT 3311, ACCT 3312, ACCT 3330, ACCT 3341, and ACCT 4323, each with a grade of C or greater. However, concurrent enrollment in ACCT 4323 is permitted. Study of federal income taxation provisions affecting the formation, operation, liquidation, acquisition, and reorganization of Sub-chapter C corporations. There will be an emphasis on research and tax planning.

ACCT 4381 Legal, Ethical, and Regulatory Environment for Accountants
Prerequisite: MKTG 2380 – Legal Environment of Business (or equivalent) with C or greater. A comprehensive overview of business law and ethics topics, such as the Uniform Commercial Code, accountant’s liability, government regulation of business, agency, contracts, debtor-creditor relationships, real property, insurance, and other topics covered in the CPA exam. Dual listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as ACCT 5381. Three credit hours.

ACCT 4392 Internship
Prerequisites: at least 90 semester hours earned with a minimum overall grade point average of 3.00; B or higher grade in all upper-level accounting courses completed to include a minimum of twelve semester hours; consent of instructor and department chairperson. Practical experience in an organizational setting designed to integrate accounting theory and applications. A written report is required. Course is offered on a CR/NC basis only, with credit being equivalent to C or greater performance. Three credit hours.

ADED – Adult Education

ADED 4301 Psychology of Adult Learning
Prerequisite: course work in adult education. Examination of the research related to adult learning and development as it can be applied to the practice of adult education. Adult learning theories of the cognitivists, behaviorists, and humanists; stages and basic theories of development. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as ADED 5301. Three credit hours.

ADED 4303 Teaching Adults
Prerequisite: course work in adult education. Examination of the teaching/learning process from planning to presentation. Micro-teaching involving the integration of adult learning principles will be conducted. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as ADED 5303. Three credit hours.

ADED 4304 Methods and Materials in Adult Education
Prerequisite: course work in adult education. An overview of the methods used to create an adult learning environment and techniques that are considered most effective. A process used for evaluating adult education materials will also be considered. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as ADED 5304. Three credit hours.

ADVT – Advertising

ADVT 3300 Advertising: an IMC Approach
Prerequisite: MKTG 3350. Fundamentals of local, national, and international advertising are covered, including social, ethical, and legal/regulatory aspects. Major members of the industry are discussed including advertisers, agencies, and the media. The advertising process is detailed, including research, strategic marketing planning, copyrighting, art direction, and media planning and selection. Three credit hours.

ADVT 3310 Advertising IMC Development
Prerequisite: ADVT 3300. Fundamentals of advertising from the advertiser’s perspective as an integrated element of the promotion mix are covered, including the administration of advertising campaigns, budgets, media planning, and advertising research. Three credit hours.

ADVT 3340 Public Relations
Prerequisite: ADVT 3300. History and development of public relations as an influential part of the management function is discussed, including the public relations process of fact finding, opinion research, planning, communicating, and evaluating. Decision making and application of management policy as it relates to the organization’s various publics is covered. Three credit hours.

ADVT 4320 Advertising IMC Implementation
Prerequisite: ADVT 3300. Writing advertising copy and creating visual graphics are covered, along with production techniques used in newspaper, magazine, radio, television, outdoor, direct mail, and other media. Different creative philosophies are studied, and creative consistency with the marketing strategy based on research is stressed. Three credit hours.

ADVT 4290, 4390 Independent Study
Prerequisites: prior consent of instructor, marketing or advertising/public relations major or minor with a minimum 3.00 GPA. Two or three credit hours.

ANTH – Anthropology

ANTH 1415 Physical Anthropology
A hands-on examination of the study of past and present human and nonhuman primates as biological organisms. Topics include human genetics, variation and osteology, nonhuman primate taxonomy and behavior, forensic anthropology and the human fossil record. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week. Four credit hours.

ANTH 2301 World Cultures
See INTS 2301.

ANTH 2316 Cultural Anthropology
Prerequisite: RHET 1311 recommended. Examines the concept of culture, cultural processes, and anthropological theories. Topics include subsistence strategies, politics, religion, gender, ethnicity, economics, marriage, stratification, and socialization. Case studies from both small-scale and large-scale societies. Required for majors. Three credit hours. (ACTS Course Number ANTH 2013)

ANTH 3312 North American Indians
Prerequisite: ANTH 2316. A study of Indian cultures from the Arctic to northern Mexico from immediately after European contact to the present. Three credit hours.

ANTH 3313 Archaeology
What do we know about past human cultures from the remains they left behind? This course is an introduction to the methods and goals of archaeological discovery. How and why do archaeologists choose research questions and what techniques do they use to answer them? What is archaeology’s role in addressing cultural heritage issues and other contemporary social concerns? The course will develop problem-solving skills, ethics, and a greater understanding of the diversity of human ways of life. Lecture, discussion, and activities. Three credit hours.

ANTH 3318 Sexuality, Society, and Culture
This course provides a social scientific examination of the nature of sexuality cross-culturally as well as in Western society. Examines sexuality in a broader socio-cultural context and cultural construction used from prehistoric to post- modern eras as a form of reproduction and a means for deep expression of intimacy with others and as a device for the domination and exploitation of people of various social categories. Three credit hours.

ANTH 3319 Cultures of the Middle East
The anthropological study of Middle Eastern culture and society; covers the political conflicts and cultural adaptations in the region. The course also focuses on ethnic differentiation, and the influence of Islam upon all the cultures and peoples of the Middle East. Three credit hours.

ANTH 3320 Buried Cities, Ancient Lives
Asking the question “How did we get here?”, this course offers a long-term perspective on human diversity and the forces of cultural change by examining the archaeological record. Why, how, and where did early cities and states arise? What did ancient cultures contribute to today’s world? Investigation of the daily lives of past peoples, technological innovations, ancient religions, and the emergence of complex economic, agricultural, and political systems. Lecture and discussion. Three credit hours.

ANTH 3378 Medical Anthropology
Prerequisite: ANTH 1415 or 2316. Comparison of non-Western and Western medical systems, definitions of health and disease, kinds of treatment, and varieties of cures; examination of the problem of how to adapt Western medicine to the needs of diverse cultural and ethnic groups. Three credit hours.

ANTH 3381 Social Statistics (See SOCI 3381)
Recommended: MATH 1301 or equivalent. Basic statistical techniques and their corresponding theoretical premises, which are often used in statistical reasoning in sociology. Qualitative variables, characteristics of attributes, measures of their variation, correlation, and tests of significance are stressed. Three credit hours.

ANTH 3383 Human Paleontology
Prerequisite: grade of C or better in ANTH 1415. Study of the fossil evidence for human evolution and the scientific principles that apply to that study; interpretation of morphological patterns in a functional and adaptive framework; interaction of cultural and biological aspects of hominid development. Three credit hours.

ANTH 3388 Relatives and Relations: Anthropology of Kinship, Marriage, and Family
Prerequisite: ANTH 2316. Systematic treatment of marriage, descent, and alliances on a cross-cultural basis. Examination of social behavior and terminologies related to kinship systems drawn from traditional and modern societies. Three credit hours.

ANTH 4310 Urban Anthropology
Prerequisite: ANTH 2316. A survey of urbanization throughout the world, with emphasis on urban adaptation of rural migrants and the phenomenon of urbanization in emerging nations. Three credit hours.

ANTH 4312 Eating Cultures
Are we what we eat? Where does our food come from? This course is a broad exploration of human foodways from local to global scales. Students will learn to critically consider issues including social and cultural food diversity, early foodways, traditional diets, nutritional anthropology, small scale vs. industrial food production, the relationship of food to the environment, hunger and obesity, local food movements, and food as a means of social negotiation and communication. Special emphasis on food issues in the US and Arkansas today. Three credit hours.

ANTH 4313 Race and Human Variation
Prerequisites: ANTH 1415 and ANTH 2316 or permission of the instructor. This course explores the role of genetics, evolution, and adaptation in producing modern human biological variation. It will also focus on how this variation is/was interpreted around the world in general and in modern and historic North America in particular. We will explore the fallacy of biological race and the simultaneous importance of the cultural concept of race. Three credit hours.

ANTH 4316 Linguistic Anthropology
Introduction to the subfield of linguistic anthropology. Examines the impact of linguistic structure on culture, socioeconomic factors in linguistic variation, intercultural and intracultural verbal and nonverbal communication. Also examines the theories and methods of descriptive anthropological linguistics applied to non Indo-European languages and introduces the student to structural linguistic analysis. Required for majors. Three credit hours.

ANTH 4320 Sociocultural Change
Prerequisite: ANTH 2316. Sociocultural change resulting from contact of acculturation, question of acceptance and rejection, pressures toward change, the role of the individual, appraisal of anthropological information and theory in a changing world. Three credit hours.

ANTH 4321 Religion, Society, and Culture
Introduction to the role of shamans, witches, diviners, cultic and magic belief systems, function of myth, ritual, religious symbolism, meaning of spirit possession, revitalization, and ancestor worship in tribal, peasant, and modern societies. Three credit hours.

HIST/ANTH 4324 The City
This interdisciplinary course focuses on “The City,” looking at the city through the lenses of anthropology, history, urban planning, geography, and the history of architecture. We will focus on the city in the imagination (the idea of the city), the city in space (urban designs and plans), and the city in time (the development of cities over the years). While readings and examples will range throughout history and across the globe, each of the three parts of the course will include an assignment looking specifically at our own urban laboratory: Little Rock.

ANTH 4325 Egyptology
This course will survey the archaeology of Egyptian civilization, from the earliest settlement of the Nile River Valley through the conquest of Alexander the Great and his successors. The course will also consider the origins of the field of Egyptology as well as a number of key archaeological sites representing the lives of the elite as well as the ordinary citizens of the Nile River Valley. Three credit hours.

ANTH 4327 Anthropology Field Experience
Practical experience consisting of at least 90 hours of supervised work in a private or public organization. The objective is for students to apply theoretical orientations and anthropological skills in a work situation. Three credit hours.

ANTH 4340 Applied Anthropology
Prerequisite: 15 hours of anthropology or consent of instructor. Selected topics concerning the contribution of anthropology to social services and social planning, especially in the fields of education, health care, law enforcement, and economic development. Three credit hours.

ANTH 4355 Forensic Anthropology
Prerequisite: ANTH 1415 or consent of instructor. Forensic anthropology applied to knowledge of human variation to legal matters. The primary emphasis in this course will be human skeletal variation. The theoretical basis of sex determination, age estimation and ethnic origin classification based upon skeletal characteristics will be examined. Other issues such as fire death scene investigation, interval since death, and forensic archaeology also will be addressed. This course will be offered once a year. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as ANTH 5355. Three credit hours.

ANTH 4155 Forensic Anthropology Laboratory
Corequisite: ANTH 4355 or prerequisite: ANTH 4355. Emphasizes hands-on experience in using anthropometric, morphological and statistical techniques employed in age and stature estimation as well as sex and race determination. Laboratory exercises also include forensic archaeology, treatment and proper handling of forensic anthropology evidence, and how to write a forensic anthropology report. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as ANTH 5155. One credit hour.

ANTH 4180, 4280, 4380 Independent Study
Prerequisites: ANTH 1415 or 2316, junior or senior standing, consent of chairperson. One, two, or three credit hours.

ANTH 4382 Anthropological Theory
Prerequisite: ANTH 1415 or 2316. Examines the range of theories used to describe and explain variability in sociocultural phenomena. Explores the organization of particular theories as well as issues that separate divergent theories. Major theoretical orientations to be explored include evolutionism, Marxism, Freudianism, structuralism, structural-functionalism, ethnoscience, diffusionism, historical particularism, cultural ecology, sociobiology, and cultural materialism. Required for majors. Three credit hours.

ANTH 4390 Teaching Internship
Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Working with individual instructors, upper- level majors assist lower-level students by holding study sessions twice a week for those enrolled in ANTH 1300, 1315, or 2316 and performing other tasks determined through consultation with the instructor. Three credit hours.

ANTH 4395 Senior Seminar in Holism
Prerequisite: completion of major core. Senior capstone course. Students read and discuss current work bridging the subfields of anthropology and write essays on their understandings of selected goals for the major. Three credit hours.

ANTH 4398 Special Topics
Selected topics in anthropology. Three credit hours.

ANTH 4399 Anthropology Cooperative Learning Internship
Prerequisite: declared major, 60 hours of course work completed, consent of the department chairperson and director of cooperative education. Placement in an applied work experience in either physical or cultural anthropology or archaeology. Students will work under the direction of specialists in these areas or specialists in related areas. Credit will be awarded based on at least 200 hours of work during the semester and fulfillment of the contractual obligations agreed to by both UALR and the public/private agency where placement occurs. Three credit hours.

ANTH 4467 Primatology
Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in ANTH 1415. This course will explore the social systems, behavior, and ecology of nonhuman primates through the examination of behavioral and biological diversity within the primate order from an evolutionary perspective. Course material will draw heavily on field studies of primates and emphasize their behavior in natural environmental and social settings. The lab portion of the class will complement lecture and reading material with practical experience in scientific research and writing. In addition to lecture, we will also meet regularly at the Little Rock Zoo to practice observational field methods used by primatologists. Four credit hours.

ANTH 4485 Ethnographic Methods
Prerequisite: ANTH 2316. Instruction and supervised practice in data gathering methods and analyses in native or ethnic settings. Lectures and discussions twice weekly. The fourth hour is reserved for field study. Data gathering methods, analysis in native or ethnic settings. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as ANTH 5485. Four credit hours.

ANTH 4487 Archaeological Investigation
Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in ANTH 3313 or consent of instructor. Hands-on experience in archaeological methods. Focus on how and why to conduct archaeological research and public archaeology. Emphasis on field and laboratory activities, methodologies, and research design that respects and involves living human communities. May be repeated once for additional credit. Four credit hours.

ANTH 4600 Archaeological Field Research
Introduction to methods and theory of archaeological research, Arkansas prehistory, and public archaeology through excavation, laboratory experience, and lectures. Meets daily, off campus. Six credit hours.

ARAD – Applied Design

ARAD 3310 Introduction to Furniture Design
A beginning course in the fundamentals of furniture design and construction. Students will design multiple furniture items and develop working drawings and scale models; learn basic material selection; and employ appropriate wood joinery and finishing. The course will require the use of hand and power tools while constructing a basic freestanding bench and table. Three credit hours.

ARAD 3320 Introduction to Jewelry and Metalsmithing
This course is an introduction to principle techniques involved in jewelry making and metalsmithing. Basic fabrication, forging, forming, connections (hot and cold), surface treatments, and finishing methods will be covered. An emphasis will be placed on the students’ mastery of problem solving, layout and design, and attention to craftsmanship in the execution of their projects. Visual presentations covering practicing smiths and historic trends will accompany the course curriculum to expose students to past and contemporary methods and ideologies in the field of jewelry and metalsmithing. Through discussions and critiques students will expand their ability to effectively speak about their work and constructively evaluate the work of their peers. The skills acquired in this course will provide the foundation for subsequent ideas and techniques related to the field of metalsmithing and jewelry. Three credit hours.

ARAD 3330 Introduction to Fiber Design
A beginning course in the fundamentals of fiber design. This course explores traditional and contemporary techniques and processes on fabric and other fiber surfaces and will introduce students to basic surface design techniques as well as basic loom and off loom weaving. Students will design and construct several samples and objects utilizing the materials and methods demonstrated throughout the course. Three credit hours.

ARAD 3340 Introduction to Blacksmithing
Prerequisites: ARST 2315 and ARST 3360. This course will focus on basic blacksmithing techniques such as how to light a coal fire, connecting multiple pieces of stock using traditional blacksmithing processes, basic skills and a working knowledge of how to operate properly all equipment in the studio. Three credit hours.

ARAD 3350 Introduction to Ceramics
This is an introductory ceramics course which will include the history, development, and aesthetics of ceramic vessels and sculpture. Students will learn basic technical aspects of building with clay, working with glazes, and the firing of ceramic objects. Emphasis will be placed on problem solving and the development of ideas. Creative process, critical thinking, and the development of design skills are also important elements of this course.

ARAD 4310 Case Furniture Design
Prerequisite: ARST 2315, ARAD 3310. An advanced course in furniture design and construction. Students will be introduced to basic wood box and cabinet design and construction. Students will design multiple furniture items and develop working drawings and scale models, practice appropriate material selection; and employ complex wood joinery and finishing. The course will require the use of hand and power tools while constructing a free standing shelving unit and a wall mounted or free standing cabinet with doors and drawers. Three credit hours.

ARAD 4311 Complex Furniture Design
Prerequisite:ARST 2315, ARAD 3310. An advanced course in complex furniture design and construction. Students will be introduced to ergonomic considerations in the design and construction of a chair. Students will develop working drawings and a scale model; practice appropriate material selection; and employ complex wood joinery and appropriate finishing. The course will require the use of hand and power tools while constructing a chair of unique or historical design integrating at least one material in addition to wood. Three credit hours.

ARAD 4312 Plywood & Composites
Prerequisite: ARAD 4310. An advanced course in Furniture Design where students will be introduced to working with non-solid wood materials in sheet-goods format such as plywood, MDF and other composites as well as the different techniques involved in veneering. Different bending techniques with appropriate molds and a vacuum bag will be covered as well. Students will design and construct several furniture objects by developing working drawings and a scale model; practice appropriate material selection; and employ complex and appropriate joinery and finishing. The course will require the use of hand and power tools while constructing a piece of furniture utilizing sheet goods and/or veneer. Three credit hours.

ARAD 4313 Lighting & Small Objects
Prerequisite: ARAD 4311. An advanced course in Furniture Design that will introduce students to the basics of lighting and small functional object design and construction. Students will design and construct several functional pieces, by developing working drawings and a scale models; practice appropriate material selection; and employ complex and appropriate joinery and finishing. Three credit hours.

ARAD 4314 Alternative Furniture Media
Prerequisite: ARAD 4311. An advanced course in furniture design and construction that will introduce non-wood materials associated with furniture making. Examples are: metal, fiberglass, mold-making and casting non-metals such as concrete, plaster and plastics as well as other alternative and experimental materials. Students will design and construct several furniture pieces by developing working drawings and a scale model; practice appropriate material selection; and employ complex and appropriate joinery and finishing. The pieces will utilize one or several of the techniques and materials covered in the course. Experimentation and material research is expected. Three credit hours.

ARAD 4320 Surface Methods in Metals
Prerequisite: ARAD 3303. This course is a continuation of techniques studied in ARAD 3320. Additional surface development techniques will be introduced and greater focus will be placed on a combination of surface treatments and stone setting methods. The resulting pieces will be directed to thoughtfully consider a relationship to the body. The new embellishment techniques will help students to continue to advance their technical skills and build a stronger sensitivity to the integration of innovative approaches and disparate materials in a cohesive manner for objects of adornment. Three credit hours.

ARAD 4321 Metal Hollowware & Color
Prerequisite: ARAD 4320.This course will build upon the technical and conceptual foundation created in ARAD 4320. Within this course students will be introduced to various sheet forming techniques and finishing processes in the production of small-scale formed elements for jewelry, vessel forms, and small-scale sculptural objects derived from forming processes. Forming techniques covered in this class will consider direct methods of shaping flat sheet and techniques forming various seamed pieces. Investigation into the coloring techniques including patination and enameling will be considered as methods of embellishment for the forms created by the students. Continued critical discussion and increased technical rigor of this course will help students to gain a more comprehensive ability to conceive their ideas and effectively execute them. Three credit hours

ARAD 4322 Small Metal Casting
Prerequisite: ARAD 4320. Casting will be explored as a method for developing three-dimensional forms in metal derived from constructed and found models. Students will investigate direct and machine enabled methods of mold making and casting. Additional processes surrounding mass production of components will be considered in this course. Alternative methods and materials for casting will also be introduced in this course. An emphasis will be place on combining previously learned techniques with newly acquired techniques in a method that is visually cohesive and technically proficient. Three credit hours.

ARAD 4323 Metal Mechanisms
Prerequisite: ARAD 4321. This course will include a more extensive exploration of complex fabrication methods and development of mechanisms to be integrated into jewelry and metal objects derived from fabrication, forming, and casting techniques. Students will explore methods of hollow construction, mechanisms, and complex surface embellishments. Technical proficiency will be reinforced, as the projects in this course require more precise design and complex construction. A conceptual basis for the assignments in this course will require students to gain an awareness of thoughtfully integrating form, function and aesthetics as they give their ideas physical form. Three credit hours.

ARAD 4324 Complex Metal Vessels
Prerequisite: ARAD 4321. Students in this intensive course will design and execute a large-scale functional vessel or series of vessels. The course will reinforce technical competency and an exploration of personal design skills in the creation of preliminary forms and finished piece for this course. An emphasis will be placed on research of historic and contemporary examples, design, appropriate technical methods, and selection and integration of materials. Students will be responsible for a comprehensive and sophisticated integration of previously acquired techniques to conceive and execute the final pieces. Three credit hours.

ARAD 4340 Intermediate Blacksmithing
Prerequisites ARAD 3340. This course will further explore the many possibilities of what blacksmithing can be in contemporary forge work. An emphasis will be placed on the traditional use of techniques whenever possible. Various hot methods: fabrication processes, welding and limited use of machining methods will be explored. Three credit hours.

ARAD 4350 Wheel Throwing
Prerequisite: ARAD 3350. This course will focus on use of the potter’s wheel, a thorough survey of wheel throwing processes through a traditional and functional emphasis. Students will also explore making additions such as handles and spouts; creative process, critical thinking, and the development of design skills are also important elements of this course. Learning how to load and fire kilns and competency in basic glaze and clay formulation and application are also emphasized.

ARAD 4351 Advanced Handbuilding
Prerequisite: ARAD 3350. This course is a comprehensive exploration of hand-building techniques for the creation of both utilitarian vessels and nonfunctional ceramic sculpture. There will be further emphasis on exploring ceramic studio tools and techniques, and a continued exploration of clay and glaze formulation and application. The course will also address both traditional and alternative firing processes.

ARAD 4352 Production Ceramics
Prerequisite: ARAD 4350. This course focuses on the exploration of creating ceramic objects through a variety of advanced forming and finishing techniques to assist with a production oriented studio methodology. By utilizing a variety of traditional and contemporary processes, students will build a greater proficiency in technique, clay and glaze technology, and firing.

ARAD 4353 Kiln Construction
Prerequisite: ARAD 4350 or ARAD4351 or consent of the instructor. A thorough study of the history of kiln building over time and cultures. The course will include the designing of a kiln for specific ceramic processes, which the students will build before the conclusion of the course. Students will also make enough work to conduct several firings.

ARAD 4354 Ceramics Sculpture
Prerequisite: ARAD 4351. Emphasis on clay as an expressive medium, stressing sculptural rather than functional concepts. Continued experience with glaze and clay formulation and application; students will also explore traditional and alternative methods of kiln firing.

ARAD 4355 Mold Making
Prerequisite: ARAD 3350 or consent of the instructor. A comprehensive course on mold making for the casting of 3-dimensional forms, focusing primarily on ceramic processes. Students will explore both historic and contemporary techniques for the creation of molds, both clay (bisque-fired) press-molds, and plaster molds that will be used for both press-molding and slip-casting.

ARAD 4398, 4698 Applied Design Internship
Prerequisite: Departmental approval. This experience will provide students with a supervised, practical experience to put into practice the skills learned in the academic setting. It will develop aspects of the art profession appropriately learned in real work situations. It will provide an opportunity for art students to work under the supervision of a professional artist. Three or six credit hours.

ARAD 4115, 4215, 4315 Advanced Problems in Design
Experimental materials and techniques in applied design, including the correlation of visual design elements with those of various multidimensional work not usually covered by normal course offerings. Course content, subtitle, and organization vary. One, two, or three credit hours.

ARED – Art Education

ARED 3245 Art for Elementary Teachers
An investigation of elementary-level art education focusing on materials and methods for teaching art history, art criticism, and studio production to children. Attention is given to the relationship of the visual arts to general education, developmental growth of children in art, curriculum planning, and current issues in art education. This course is offered for preprofessional teachers in the College of Education’s Early Childhood Education program. Two credit hours.

ARED 3316 Teaching Art in the Secondary School
Methods and materials for teaching art in the secondary school. (See “Secondary Teacher Licensure”) Three credit hours.

ARED 4310 Special Topics in Art Education
Special topics for the study of Art Education as it may relate to social, political, legal or other topical interests especially areas not covered by normal course offerings. Course content, subtitle, and organization vary. Three credit hours.

ARED 4325 Foundations in Art Education
A survey of the history of art education with an emphasis on the changing philosophies, theories of learning, and the subsequent goals and objectives made apparent in curriculum development. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as ARED 5325. Three credit hours.

ARED 4326 Art and Cognitive Development
An investigation of the relationship of the visual arts to the developmental growth of children. Attention is given to current cognitive theory, motivational theory and curriculum issues in addressing all populations in art education, including special education and gifted and talented students. Three credit hours.

ARED 4327 Art Theory and Criticism
The course prepares art education majors to discuss and analyze visual images found within the art world. Students will learn techniques and approaches for teaching aesthetics, art criticism and art history that can be implemented in curriculum for various grade levels. Three credit hours.

ARED 4328 Curriculum and Assessment in Art Education
Prerequisites: ARED 4325, ARED 4326, ARED 4327. An investigation of contemporary art education curriculum and assessment models. The course prepares art education majors to develop curriculum and assessments that incorporate state and national art content standards for K-12 students. Three credit hours.

ARED 4194, 4294, 4394 Independent Study
Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Research on a subject selected in consultation with the instructor. Admission to this course must be approved by the art education advisor before registration. May be taken for one, two, or three credit hours.

ARED 4129 Art Education Seminar
Prerequisites: ARED 4325, ARED 4326, ARED 4328. This course focuses on helping students reflect and evaluate their art pedagogical practice. One credit hour.

ARHA – Art History and Appreciation

Prerequisites for all advanced courses in the history of art: ARHA 2310 for ancient and medieval; ARHA 2311 for all other courses; or consent of instructor. ARHA 2310 must precede ARHA 2311. Upper-level courses are offered no more frequently than once every two years; they are offered on an irregular basis during summer terms.

Each art history credit hour requires three clock hours of work each week. One hour is scheduled in class and the additional two hours are scheduled outside class.
The undraped human figure appears as a significant subject throughout much of art history and is evident within the art history curriculum.

ARHA 2305 Introduction to Visual Art
Recommended prerequisite: RHET 1311. Introduction to the creative process and history of art, vocabulary and descriptive terms used in the visual arts, and how to write about them. Attendance at arts events is required. Students will learn through writing, reading, discussing, listening, and participating in critical thinking and problem-solving activities. Fulfills core requirement in aesthetics along with student’s choice of either MUHL 2305 and THEA 2305. Three credit hours.(ACTS Course Number ARTA 1003)

ARHA 2310 Survey of the History of Art I
Survey of the art history from prehistoric times to the Renaissance. Three credit hours.(ACTS Course Number ARTA 2003)

ARHA 2311 Survey of the History of Art II
Prerequisite: ARHA 2310 or consent of instructor. Survey of the history of art from the Renaissance through the contemporary period. Three credit hours.(ACTS Course Number ARTA 2103)

ARHA 2312 Survey of Non-Western Art
Prerequisite: ARHA 2310 or consent of instructor. Introduction to art outside the Western European tradition which focuses on the major artistic traditions of India, China, Japan, Africa, Oceania, and the Americas. Emphasis is placed on recognition of major works of art and artistic style and what these reveal about the cultures that produced them. Three credit hours.

ARHA 3301 American Art
Prerequisite: ARHA 2311 or consent of instructor. American art from the colonial period to early twentieth century. Three credit hours.

ARHA 3302 History of Photography and Related Visual Arts
Prerequisite: ARHA 2311 or consent of instructor. Major figures in the history of art who used the camera as their medium, beginning with the nineteenth-century figures such as Daguerre and Fox-Talbot and continuing to the present. Emphasis on the analysis of photographs, motion pictures, and video works in terms of style, iconography, social history, and connoisseurship. Three credit hours.

ARHA 3304 Medieval Art
Prerequisite: ARHA 2310 or consent of instructor. Early Christian, Byzantine, Carolingian, Ottonian, Romanesque, and Gothic art. Three credit hours.

ARHA 3309 History of Design
Prerequisite: ARHA 2311 or consent of the instructor. This course will present major artists and movements in the history of textiles, ceramics, metals, wood, and graphic design, with emphasis on the modern period. Three credit hours.

ARHA 3390 Neighborhood Studies
No prerequisite. Little Rock like other cities, is made up of multiple neighborhoods, each with unique culture and history. This course emphasizes community engagement through active study of UALR’s University District/Promise Neighborhood communities, using the disciplinary tools of art, criminal justice, and history. After studying neighborhoods through the lenses of these disciplines, students will engage in service learning with Promise Neighborhood Advisory Board members to address neighborhood issues. Cross-listed with CRJU 3390, HIST 3390, GEOG 3390. Three credit hours.

ARHA 4300 Studies in the History of Art
Prerequisite: ARHA 2311 or consent of instructor. A seminar for advanced students involving research on topics in art history, criticism, and aesthetics selected for study by students in consultation with art history faculty. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as ARHA 5300. Three credit hours.

ARHA 4301 Art and Architecture Study Tour
Prerequisite: ARHA 2311 or consent of instructor. Travel study tour involving directed reading and research on objects to be seen during the tour. Three credit hours.

ARHA 4302 Art Museum Studies
Prerequisite: 6 hours of upper-level art history courses or permission of instructor. An introduction to art museum operation, topics covered will include the acquisition, management, and care of works of art, exhibition planning and installation, administration functions, educational and community roles of museums, finance and fundraising. The goals of the course are to familiarize students with the day-to-day work of an art museum and to engage them in critical thinking about the broader context in which it operates. Three credit hours.

ARHA 4304 Ancient Art
Prerequisite: ARHA 2310 or consent of instructor. A study of the history of ancient art and architecture with emphasis on the Greek and Roman periods. Three credit hours.

ARHA 4305 Italian Renaissance Art
Prerequisite: ARHA 2311 or consent of instructor. Painting, sculpture, and architecture in Italy from c. 1300 to c. 1600. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as ARHA 5305. Three credit hours.

ARHA 4306 Renaissance Art in Northern Europe
Prerequisite: ARHA 2311 or consent of instructor. Painting, sculpture, architecture, and graphic arts in northern Europe (especially the Low Countries, France, and England), from the end of the Gothic period through the Reformation. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as ARHA 5306. Three credit hours.

ARHA 4307 Eighteenth and Nineteenth-Century Art in Europe
Prerequisite: ARHA 2311 or consent of instructor. Painting, sculpture, and architecture in Europe during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as ARHA 5307. Three credit hours.

ARHA 4308 Twentieth-Century Painting, Sculpture, and Graphic Arts Since 1945
Prerequisite: ARHA 2311 or consent of instructor. Painting, sculpture, and graphic arts from 1945 to the present. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as ARHA 5308. Three credit hours.

ARHA 4309 History of Arkansas Architecture
Prerequisite: ARHA 2311 or consent of instructor. The development of architecture in Arkansas from its origins to the present. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as ARHA 5309. Three credit hours.

ARHA 4315 Modern Architecture
Prerequisite: ARHA 2305. A study of the major architectural developments in European and American architecture from 1900 to the present. The focus will be upon European architecture from 1900 to 1930, and upon architecture in the U.S. from 1930 to 1970. Consideration will be given to both technological innovations and to issues current in architectural design, such as preservation and adaptive reuse of historic buildings. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as ARHA 5315. Three credit hours.

ARHA 4384 Baroque Art
Prerequisite: ARHA 2311 or consent of instructor. Painting, sculpture, and architecture in northern Europe (the Netherlands, France), Spain, and Italy from 1600 to c. 1725. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as ARHA 5384. Three credit hours.

ARHA 4385 Seminar in Italian Renaissance and Baroque Art
Prerequisite: ARHA 2311 or consent of instructor. Directed research for advanced students on various problems of Italian Renaissance or Baroque art from c. 1300 to 1725. Taught by the seminar method. Three credit hours.

ARHA 4386 Problems in Northern European Renaissance and Baroque Art
Prerequisite: ARHA 2311 or consent of instructor. Directed research for advanced students on various problems of northern European art. Taught by the seminar method. Three credit hours.

ARHA 4387 Late Nineteenth- and Early Twentieth-Century Art in Europe
Prerequisite: ARHA 2311 or consent of instructor. Painting, sculpture, graphic arts, and architecture from the postimpressionist period until WW II. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as ARHA 5387. Three credit hours.

ARHA 4388 Problems in Modern Art
Prerequisite: ARHA 2311 or consent of instructor. Discussion of selected problems in painting, sculpture, or architecture of the eighteenth, nineteenth, or twentieth centuries. Taught by the seminar method. Three credit hours.

ARHA 4397 Capstone in Art History
Pre-requisite: 21 hours in art history, including ARHA 4300. Offered Fall and Spring. Required for art history majors. An independent research project under faculty guidance. The project must be presented in writing and orally. Normally taken in a student’s last semester. Three credit hours.

ARHA 4110, 4210, 4310 Special Topics in Art History
Special topics for the study of individual artists, or particular periods, geographic areas, or media in the history of art, especially areas not covered by normal course offerings. Course content, subtitle, and organization vary. One, two, or three credit hours.

ARHA 4191, 4291, 4391 Independent Study
Prerequisite: consent of Department of Art faculty. Open only to superior students who seek to do special research on a topic selected in consultation with the instructor. One, two, or three credit hours.

ARST – Studio Art

Each studio art credit hour requires four clock hours of work each week. Two of these hours are scheduled and the additional hours occur outside of scheduled class time in the open studio workspace. Each studio is scheduled to be open for these additional hours.

The undraped human figure is a significant subject within the studio art curriculum.

ARST 1201 FYE: Visual Arts (2 hours)
No Prerequisite. Students will be introduced to a wide range of facilities, faculty and programs in the Department of Art. Students will be engaged in a range of assignments that will prepare students for coursework they will encounter in their art studies. Assignments and activities will include research problems, presentations, class readings, gallery visits and critical dialogs. Students will build foundational understanding of concepts and ideas that will encourage confidence and critical awareness in the visual arts. (2 credit hours)

ARST 1310 Basic Drawing
A beginning course in drawing with attention to the formal elements (Elements of Art and Principles of Design). Emphasis is placed on drawing realistically using line and/or value. Topics to be covered are; the use of line, creation of volume through the use of value, expressive mark-making, composition, and perspective. Three credit hours.

ARST 1315 Two-Dimensional Design
Introduction to concepts of design in visual art. Emphasis on two-dimensional forms. Recommended for non-art majors who want to take some studio art courses. Three credit hours.

ARST 2310 Figure Drawing
Prerequisite: ARST 1310. Introduction to figure drawing; emphasis on anatomy, composition, and orientation to media. The undraped human figure is the primary subject. Three credit hours.

ARST 2315 Three-Dimensional Design
Prerequisite: ARST 1315. Concepts of three-dimensional design. Emphasis on both form and content. Three credit hours.

ARST 2318 Computer Applications in Art
Problems in design utilizing computer technologies for the visual artist with an emphasis on proficiency in computer applications, design and computer-aided imagery. Three credit hours.

ARST 3310 Drawing: Creative Invention
Prerequisite: ARST 2310. An advanced course with emphasis on invention and personal creative investigation. Three credit hours.

ARST 3312 Contemporary Crafts
An introductory course introducing students to the four areas of Contemporary Craft: wood, metal, ceramics and fiber through demos and assignments. The course will focus on developing proper technique associated with each material, developing a personal design aesthetic through the making of one-of-a-kind objects as well as the development of a high level of craftsmanship. This course will require some use of hand and power tools while students develop items from each area. Three credit hours.

ARST 3320 Painting Fundamentals 1
Prerequisites: ARST 1310, 1315, or consent of instructor. An introduction to oil painting by working primarily from still life and landscape with emphasis on both representational and expressive approaches. Three credit hours.

ARST 3321 Painting Fundamentals 2
Prerequisite: ARST 3320, or consent of instructor. Continuation of previous study with emphasis on more complex and varied assignments. Three credit hours.

ARST 3330 Printmaking Basics
Prerequisites: ARST 1310 and ARST 1315. Introduction to basic woodcut, linoleum cut, etching, and lithography. Three credit hours.

ARST 3331 Lithography Techniques
Prerequisites: ARST 3330. A complete study in lithography using a variety of drawing media and methods to include Bavarian Limestone and aluminum plate processes. Three credit hours.

ARST 3340 Introduction to Graphic Design
Prerequisites: ARST 1310, 1315, 2318; or consent of instructor. Instruction in the aesthetic, creative, and technical aspects of graphic design. Focus is given to the application of the elements of art and the principles of design to graphic design solutions, as well as effective use of typography. Three credit hours.

ARST 3341 Typography
Prerequisite: ARST 3340 or consent of instructor. An exploration of the art and practice of type as a tool for visual communication; this course covers the history of typography, type anatomy, terminology, and technical handling. Critical thinking and problem solving skills will be encouraged with the practical application of design principles. Three credit hours.

ARST 3360 Introduction to Sculpture
Basic additive, subtractive and reproductive processes in problems using figurative clay modeling, stone carving, mold making, plaster casting, concrete casting and metal casting. Three credit hours.

ARST 3361 Figurative Clay Sculpture
Prerequisite: ARST 2310. Exploration of the human head and figure using basic additive and subtractive techniques. Students will sculpt from draped and undraped models in terra cotta clay to be fired. Three credit hours.

ARST 3370 Introduction to Photography
An introduction to the basic technical skills for black and white digital photography. The course also emphasizes the visual organization of an effective photograph. Prerequisite for all other photography courses. No previous experience is necessary, but students must provide their own single-lens-reflex digital camera. Three credit hours.

ARST 3371 Intermediate Photography
Prerequisite: ARST 3370. Exploration of current modes of photographic expression with an emphasis on content. Students continue to develop both their black and white technical skills and their ability to visually organize a photograph. Prerequisite to all advanced photography offerings. Three credit hours.

ARST 3380 Introduction to Illustration
Prerequisites: ARST 1310, 1315 and 2310. Instruction in the use of traditional media and visualization techniques for illustrative purposes. Projects encourage visual thinking skills using black and white and color media including wet and dry process with an emphasis placed on achieving technical proficiency. A variety of media and surfaces will be explored. Three credit hours.

ARST 3381 Book Illustration
Prerequisite: ARST 3380 or consent of instructor. Instruction in the production of artwork for the book publishing industry. Discussion topics and projects develop students’ skills in interpreting stories and manuscripts with unique visual imagery. Three credit hours.

ARST 3385 Vector Graphics for Illustrators and Designers
Prerequisite: ARST 1310, 1315 and 2318 or consent of the instructor. A study of computer illustration software covering the most popular vector illustration programs in use today. Emphasis on aesthetic judgment and technical proficiency in developing works of art for illustration and design portfolio. Three credit hours.

ARST 3386 Digital Imaging for Illustrators and Designers
Prerequisite: ARST 1310, 1315 and 2318 or consent of the instructor. Studio illustration and design techniques in Adobe Photoshop. Emphasis is placed on aesthetic judgment, technical proficiency and production techniques. Three credit hours.

ARST 4310 Drawing: Concept Development
Prerequisite: ARST 3310 or consent of instructor. Exploration of perceptual and conceptual issues in drawing, including study of contemporary artists and trends to stimulate self-directed projects. Three credit hours.

ARST 4311 Drawing: Contemporary Trends
Prerequisite: ARST 4310 or consent of instructor. A continuation of issues introduced in ARST 4310. Students will continue to expand their work in the context of current issues, aesthetic trends, and the current cultural milieu. Three credit hours.

ARST 4312 Drawing: Personal Content
Prerequisite: ARST 4311 or consent of instructor. The focus of this course is the continuance of previous research and self-directed study in drawing and preparation of works for the senior exhibition. Three credit hours. This course may be repeated once for an additional three credit hours.

ARST 4115, 4215, 4315 Advanced Problems in Design
Experimental materials and techniques in two- and three-dimensional design, including the correlation of visual design elements with those of various multidimensional work not usually covered by normal course offerings. Course content, subtitle, and organization vary. One, two, or three credit hours.

ARST 4320 Painting: Personal Content I
Prerequisite: ARST 3321, or consent of instructor. An introduction to self-directed study with emphasis on various painting concepts while focusing on the establishment of a personal direction in painting. Three credit hours.

ARST 4321 Painting: Personal Content 2
Prerequisite: ARST 4320, or consent of instructor. Continuation of previous research and self-directed study in painting emphasizing a more advanced level. Three credit hours.

ARST 4323 Painting: Personal Content 3
Prerequisite: ARST 4321, or consent of instructor. Continuation of previous research and self-directed study in preparation for the BFA Project and the Senior Exhibition. Three credit hours.

ARST 4324 Painting Portfolio
Prerequisite: ARST 4323, or consent of instructor. Emphasis on the continuing creation of a body of work in preparation for advancement to the next academic level; graduate school, career, etc. Three credit hours.

ARST 4330 Color Intaglio-Etching Basics
Prerequisites: ARST 3330. Exploration of intaglio-etching basic color separation processes and multiple-plate printing techniques. Three credit hours.

ARST 4331 Advanced Color Intaglio-Etching
Prerequisite: ARST 4330. Instruction in advanced color etching-intaglio techniques to include traditional and current trends in printmaking. Three credit hours.

ARST 4332 Mixed Media Color Printmaking
Prerequisite: ARST 4331. Instruction in advanced color techniques to reflect current trends and innovative approaches to printmaking. Three credit hours.

ARST 4340 Print Design
Prerequisite: ARST 3341 or consent of instructor. Instruction in varied aspects of graphic design theory, with emphasis on visual communication, client restrictions, and deadlines. Students also explore the production aspects of graphic design and technical proficiency in creating print-ready digital mechanicals. Three credit hours.

ARST 4341 Package Design
Prerequisite: ARST 3341 or consent of instructor. Advanced graphic design practice with exploration of 3-D forms and surface graphics. Students encounter design problems outside the scope of traditional print layouts by designing containers, point-of-purchase, and prototypes. Three credit hours.

ARST 4342 Graphic Design Methodologies
Prerequisite: ARST 4341 or consent of instructor. A study of advanced graphic design theory challenging students to address alternative design problems through conceptual and technical innovation. Exploration of traditional and new media techniques with print layout, multiple component design, advanced typography, motion graphics through both individual and collaborative projects.

ARST 4348 Production Design for the Internet
Prerequisite: ARST 3356 or consent of the instructor. A study of computer software as tools for the graphic designer in the web design industry. Students complete a series of projects illustrating the different design and production capabilities of individual software programs and their interrelationships. Students produce a variety of projects, from small scale graphics to complete web sites. Three credit hours.

ARST 4360 Metal Casting Techniques
Prerequisite: ARST 3360. Design and assembly of small and large-scale functional objects and sculpture to cast in metal. Class focuses on complete process from inception of design to finished cast product. Different casting, pattern making, spruing, and patina finishing techniques are explored. Three credit hours.

ARST 4361 Stone Carving Techniques
Prerequisite ARST 3360. Explore the basics of stone carving through making a clay model, then transcribing that model into stone using hand tools, electrical power tools, air tools and finishes to realize a concept. Three credit hours.

ARST 4362 Concrete Casting and Building
Prerequisite ARST 3360. Explore basic techniques of building armatures for concrete fabrication; methods and materials for concrete casting; researching additives for structural strength; coloring agents for surface and body coloration with stains and paints; basic fabrication techniques for model building; and design approaches for assembly of small and large scale functional objects and sculpture. Three credit hours.

ARST 4363 Metal Welding and Fabrication
Prerequisite: ARST 3360. Explore basic techniques of welding using oxy-acetylene, electric arc, TIG, MIG; cutting methods using plasma torch and oxy-acetylene; basic fabrication techniques for model building; and design approaches for assembly of small and large scale functional objects and sculpture. Three credit hours.

ARST 4370 Professional Photo Techniques
Prerequisites: ARST 3370, ARST 3371. Overview of portrait and commercial photography with an emphasis on studio lighting techniques. Three credit hours.

ARST 4371 Alternative Photo Methods
Prerequisites: ARST 3370, ARST 3371. Exploration of alternative methods of photographic image making. Assignments challenge each student to question traditional techniques and materials. Three credit hours.

ARST 4372 Digital Color Photography
Prerequisites: ARST 3370, ARST 3371. Introduction to digital color photography with an emphasis on the technical skills required. Students explore the theory and expressive uses of color as it pertains to photography. Three credit hours.

ARST 4373 Advanced Problems in Photography
Prerequisites: ARST 4370, ARST 4371, ARST 4372 or permission of the instructor based upon demonstrated equivalent experience. The further exploration of concepts introduced in other photography courses. Individual assignments based on each student’s previous experience and interest. May be repeated for additional credit. Three credit hours.

ARST 4374 Large-Format Photography
Prerequisites: ARST 3370, ARST 3371. Introduction to large-format photographic techniques and aesthetics. Camera and accessories are provided by the department. Three credit hours.

ARST 4380 Concept Illustration
Prerequisite: ARST 3381 or consent of instructor.
Instruction in the production of conceptual artwork for the movie and videogame industry. Discussions and projects include preliminary work, visualization methods and the creation of artwork in both traditional and digital media. Three credit hours.

ARST 4381 Editorial Illustration
Prerequisite: ARST 3380 or consent of instructor. Instruction in the production of conceptually based artwork for editorial publication. Discussion topics include visual problem solving with individual and expressive imagery. Hands-on projects allow for a variety of approaches to the creation of finished artwork. Three credit hours.

ARST 4192, 4292, 4392 Independent Study
Open only to the advanced student who seeks to do special research on a subject selected in consultation with the instructor. Admission to this course must be approved by the art department before registration. One, two, or three hours credit.

ARST 4394 BFA Seminar
Prerequisites: Completion of 3000 level coursework in emphasis area and acceptance to BFA Program. First term of advanced research, concept development and art production in the student’s concentration area. Students develop independent projects supervised by thesis advisor and meet with BFA peers at regular intervals for critique and discussion. Specific course requirements are contracted with the BFA thesis adviser. Cannot be taken concurrently with BFA Thesis Project 2. Three credit hours.

ARST 4395 BFA Thesis Project
Prerequisites: Completion of 3000 level coursework in emphasis area, acceptance to BFA Program and completion of ARST 4394. Final term of advanced research, concept development and art production in the student’s concentration area. Students continue to meet with Faculty and BFA peers at regular intervals for critique and discussion. Specific course requirements are contracted with the BFA thesis adviser. Final requirements include a portfolio of work, artist’s statement and an exhibition of the thesis project work in a format appropriate to the subject area. Cannot be taken concurrently with BFA Thesis Project 1. Three credit hours.

ARST 4397 Capstone: Studio Art
This course provides the capstone experience for senior art studio majors. Course includes career analysis, gallery portfolio presentation, photographing art, packing and shipping art, a mock interview or a project proposal presentation and the development of a resume, an artist statement and a gallery talk. Three credit hours.

ASCI – Applied Science

ASCI 4310 Introduction to Signal Processing Cross-Listed (SYEN 4310)
Prerequisite: MATH 3322 or equivalent. Introduction to the fundamental concepts and mathematics in signal processing. Use of the fundamental transform techniques (Laplace transform, discrete Fourier transform, z-transform). Discrete time representation of signals, linear time invariant systems. Correlation, coherence, power spectral density, and time delays. Bode plots, poles and zeros, state space. Standard system models (ARMA, ARMAX). FIR and IIR filters. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as ASCI 5310. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

ASCI 4355 Elastic Wave Theory (Cross-listed with SYEN 4371)
Prerequisite: MATH 3322. Analysis of stress and infinitesimal strain. Perfect elasticity. Equation of motion in term of displacement. Vibration and waves. Theories of body and surface waves. Ray theory and energy partition. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as ASCI 5355. Three credit hours.

ASCI 4360 Potential Theory
Solution to Laplace equation using different boundary and initial conditions. One-, two-, and three-dimensional equations will be analyzed. Various coordinate systems (rectangular, cylindrical, and spherical) will be used in the solution of Laplace equation. Bessel function and orthogonality of Bessel function. Legendre function, Associate Legendre function, and orthogonality of Legendre function. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as ASCI 5360. Three credit hours.

ASTR – Astronomy

ASTR 1100 Observational Astronomy
An introduction to telescopes, the apparent movements of the sun, and constellations. Special facilities include the 12-inch computer-controlled telescope with electronic camera and the Planetarium. The course includes lectures, discussions, demonstrations, and laboratory experiments. Offered nights only. One credit hour.

ASTR 1101 Introduction to Astronomy Laboratory
Prerequisite or corequisite: ASTR 1301 or 1311. A laboratory course designed to accompany ASTR 1301. A variety of activities in data acquisition and analysis which tie concepts discussed in the classroom to real-world experiences. Open laboratory, the planetarium, and observatory activities. One credit hour. (ACTS Course Number PHYS 1204)

ASTR 1301 Introduction to Astronomy
Study of the process of science by which knowledge about our place in the cosmos is obtained. Examples of possible observations and the inferences drawn from them. Emphasis on how we obtain our knowledge and the certainty of various parts of it. A core curriculum course. Three credit hours. (ACTS Course Number PHYS 1204)

ASTR 2300 Intermediate Astronomy
MATH 0301 required. ASTR 1301 recommended. An Allegra-based astronomy course, with an emphasis on applying the tools of physics to understand the processes inherent in galaxies, cosmology and the structure and evolution of stars. Three hours lecture per week. Spring only.

ASTR 3301 Astronomical Techniques
Prerequisite: PHYS 2322. ASTR 2300 recommended but not required. A thorough introduction to the techniques of observational astronomy, starting with the basics of positional astronomy and systems of time. Includes discussions on the basics of light and effects of the atmosphere on astronomical observations, optical telescopes, detectors (including CCDs), photometry, astrometry, spectroscopy, and statistical methods. Three credit hours.

ASTR 3401 Scientific Computing and Image Processing in Astronomy
Students work in a scientific computing environment using the UNIX/Linux operating system. Professional image processing software is used to analyze astronomical images from real data. Extensive use is made of internet resources. An integrated self-paced course equivalent to three lecture hours and two laboratory hours per week. Four credit hours.

ASTR 4301 Astrophysics
PHYS 2322 required. ASTR 2300 recommended, but not required. An upper level course in astrophysics, with an emphasis on applying the tools of mechanics, electromagnetism, thermodynamics, and quantum theory to understand the processes inherent in galaxies, cosmology and the structure and evolution of stars. This course is dual listed in the graduate catalog as ASTR 5301. Three hours lecture per week. Three credit hours. Spring only.

AUSP – Audiology/Speech Pathology

AUSP 2360 Introduction to Speech and Hearing Disorders
A description and discussion of speech, language, and hearing disorders; therapy surveys and assessment techniques. Three credit hours.

AUSP 3350 Phonetics
In-depth study of principles of phonetics and their application to speech. Three credit hours.

AUSP 3360 Language and Speech Acquisition
Prerequisite: consent of instructor. The study of normal verbal speech and language acquisition. Three credit hours.

AUSP 3361 Speech Anatomy and Physiology
Anatomy and physiology of the speech and hearing mechanism and associated structures. Three credit hours.

AUSP 3362 Hearing Science
Prerequisite: AUSP 2360 or consent of instructor. An introduction to the study of hearing. Emphasis will be given to the elements of sound, auditory physiology, psychoacoustical methods, and theories of hearing. Three credit hours.

AUSP 3363 Disorders in Articulation
Prerequisites: AUSP 2360 and 3350 or consent of instructor. Theory, evaluation, and therapeutic procedures with functional and organic articulatory and phonological disorders. Three credit hours.

AUSP 3364 Speech Science
Prerequisite: AUSP 3350. Speech as an acoustic phenomenon; special reference to voice, rate, articulation; survey of experimental literature; theoretical, practical consideration of mechanical, electrical instruments used in diagnostic, therapeutic, experimental aspects of speech pathology, audiology. Three credit hours.

AUSP 3365 Clinical Management
Prerequisite: AUSP 2360. For majors only. Clinical procedures for working in various practicum settings, using diagnostic and therapeutic techniques, writing behavioral objectives, procedures for report writing, and practical experience with clinician-made and commercial materials. First in the series of practicum courses. Three credit hours.

AUSP 4162 Practicum I
Prerequisites: AUSP 3365, consent of instructor. For majors only. Supervised clinical practice in the areas of speech and/or language disorders. Requires at least 15 client clock hours. Must be taken first in clinical practicum series. One credit hour.

AUSP 4163 Practicum II
Prerequisites: AUSP 3365, 4162, consent of instructor. For majors only. Only two practicums may be taken on the undergraduate level. One credit hour.

AUSP 4164 Practicum III
Prerequisites: AUSP 3365, consent of instructor. For majors only. Supervised clinical activity in specialized areas. Requires 60 client clock hours. Only two practicums may be taken on the undergraduate level. One credit hour.

AUSP 4363 Voice and Stuttering Disorders
Prerequisites: AUSP 2360, 3361, 3350, or consent of instructor. Etiology, evaluative, and therapeutic procedures for persons with voice disorders and with various types of verbal disfluency behaviors. Three credit hours.

AUSP 4364 Differential Diagnosis of Speech and Language Disorders
Prerequisites: AUSP 2360, 3360, 3363, or consent of instructor. Interview and test procedures used in evaluating speech and language disorders. Emphasis on use and interpretation of standardized test measures. Three credit hours.

AUSP 4366 Language Disorders
Prerequisite: AUSP 3360 or consent of instructor. Language disorders in adults and children including types of language disorders, etiology, neurological and theoretical correlates, diagnostic procedures and test interpretation, and treatment protocols. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as AUSP 5366. Three credit hours.

AUSP 4368 Audiology
Prerequisite: AUSP 3362. Principles of auditory reception; the hearing mechanism; problems involved in measuring, evaluating, and conserving hearing. Clinical observation. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as AUSP 5368. Three credit hours.

AUSP 4369 Audiologic Rehabilitation
Prerequisite: AUSP 2360, 4368, or consent of instructor. Principles of audiologic habilitation/rehabilitation with infants, children, and adults with hearing loss. Discussion of communication and education options for children with hearing loss, counseling techniques, communication strategies, and the use of amplification and other assistive technologies. Three credit hours.

AUSP 4101, 4201, 4301 Independent Study
Students will read and research in a selected area of communicative disorders. Projects and papers must be approved by the instructor before registration. One, two, or three credit hours.

BINF – Bioinformatics

BINF 3345 Introduction to Bioinformatics
Prerequisites: MATH 1302, BIOL 1400 or 1401, and IFSC 1202 (or equivalent programming course). This course introduces the student to bioinformatics: the application of information science to studies in the life sciences. Using a project based approach, students will be exposed to programming, database, and analysis concepts and tools applicable to the life, medical, and health sciences along with an interdisciplinary approach to understanding the evolving field of biomedical informatics. Two hours of lecture and one hour of laboratory per week. Three credit hours.

BINF 4445 Bioinformatics Theory and Applications
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor or the following: BIOL 3300, IFSC 3320, IFSC 2300, and STAT 3352 or equivalents. BINF 2345 is recommended. An overview of concepts central to the study and application of bioinformatics drawing upon the fields of biostatistics, computer and information science, and the life sciences. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as BINF 5445. Three hours of lecture and two hours laboratory per week. Four credit hours.

BINS – Business Information Systems

BINS 1310 Fundamentals of Information Technology
An introduction to computer information system concepts and the components and capabilities of a computer system. Emphasis on the development of spreadsheet and word processing competencies. Three credit hours.

BINS 2320 Business Communication Skills
Basic principles of effective language usage in written business communication. Three credit hours. (ACTS Course Number BUS 2013)

BINS 3305 Business Information Systems
Prerequisite: 70% score on Information Technology Qualifying Exam or MGMT 1310 or equivalent. This course provides an introduction to the impact of information systems on the management of organizations with emphasis on information systems as a tool for management of organizations. Students learn to use software (including integrated database tools) to facilitate managerial decision making, planning, and control. Three credit hours.

BINS 3307 Systems Development Methodologies
Methods, tools, and techniques of system development. The system development life cycle will be studied using traditional and non-traditional methods. Development tools will be explored as well as key development techniques for system analysis and design. Three credit hours.

BINS 3352 Data Analysis/Visualization
Prerequisiste: 70% score on Information Technology Qualifying Exam. Development of analytical, data visualization and reporting, and collaboration skills necessary for success in a data driven business environment. Focus on cutting-edge technologies in a business context. Three credit hours.

BINS 3380 Business Communication
Prerequisites: RHET 1312 and SPCH 1300. Theories of communication applied to internal and external business communication, including composition of letters, memos, and reports. Emphasis on interpersonal communication theory and oral communication skills for business. Three credit hours.

BINS 4310 Network Technologies
Prerequisite: Junior standing or consent of the instructor. A study of the role of telecommunications in information resource management, with emphasis on business applications in a network environment. Principles of network design and installation, system component selection, administration, security, and control. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as BINS 5310. Three credit hours.

BINS 4311 Security Issues and Advanced Topics in Network Technologies
Prerequisite: MGMT 4310 or consent of the instructor. Advanced study of the role of telecommunications and computer networks in information resource management, with emphasis on security in network environments. Develops technical and critical thinking skills in a hands-on environment. Three credit hours.

BINS 4312 Object-Oriented Programming
Beginning object-oriented programming course. Focuses on business problem solving and solution development. Three credit hours.

BINS 4314 Advanced Programming
Prerequisite: C or better in BINS (or MGMT) 4312 or equivalent. An advanced object-oriented programming course which focuses on development techniques for business applications with emphasis on secure access of cloud storage from mobile devices.

BINS 4331 Management of Information Resources
Prerequisite: BINS 3305 or consent of the instructor. A study of a manager’s role and decisions regarding information systems strategy, the management of information, technology operations, and information systems projects within the organization. Three credit hours.

BINS 4350 Business Database Management Systems
Addresses the concepts and principles underlying the design and application of relational database management systems. The course provides an in-depth study of the key concepts of relational database systems. Projects, which typically are implemented using current commercial database management systems software, are used to reinforce most of the concepts. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as BINS 5350. Three credit hours.

BINS 4351 Data Analysis and Reporting
Prerequisite: C or better in BINS (or MGMT) 4350 or equivalent or consent of the instructor. Students will gain practical experience is using advanced database techniques and data visualization, data warehousing, reporting, and other Business Intelligence (BI) tools. Contemporary BI tools and techniques will be used to create intelligent solutions to realistic business problems. This course is dual listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as BINS 5351. Three credit hours.

BINS 4355 Information Systems Development Project
Prerequisite: BINS 3307, BINS 4312, and BINS 4350. Emphasis on development of an information system project using structured analysis methodology and tools developed in previous MIS courses. The class forms project teams; accepts developmental assignments; and follows the systems development life cycle process to design a new system. Students are required to produce a working system. Three credit hours.

BINS 4360 Bus Analytics Project Development
Prerequisite: C or better in BINS 4351, FINC 4355, MKTG 4310, and SPCH 3320. Students will investigate the integration of business analytics systems across different industries with a focus on strategic value creation. From a project management perspective, student teams will track analytics systems from the needs analysis stage to project delivery. Related security and ethics issues will be analyzed.

BIOL – Biology

BIOL 1102 Introductory Biology Laboratory
A laboratory course in introductory biology covering the general concepts of microscope use, cell organization, physical and chemical bases of life, energy processing, cell reproduction, plant tissue structures, animal structures, organismic reproduction and development, genetics, and evolution. Offered only to students who have transfer credit for three credit hours of introductory biology lecture or the equivalent. Two hours laboratory per week. One credit hour.

BIOL 1111 Introduction to Human Anatomy and Physiology I Laboratory
Prerequisite: Only for students that have taken A&P I lecture or equivalent elsewhere or completed an online A&P I lecture equivalent. A laboratory course designed to be taught inside the current BIOL 1411 course and offered only to students that have 3 hours of Biology Department approved transfer credit for A&P I lecture or equivalent. After an introduction, the following topics will be discussed: basic chemistry, cell biology, histology, integumentary system, skeletal system, nervous system, and sensory system. This course cannot be used for credit toward a biology major or minor. Two hours laboratory per week. One credit hour.

BIOL 1112 Introduction to Human Anatomy and Physiology II Laboratory
Prerequisite: Only for students that have taken A&P II lecture or equivalent elsewhere or completed an online A&P II lecture equivalent. A laboratory course designed to be taught inside the current BIOL 1412 course and offered only to students that have 3 hours of Biology Department approved transfer credit for A&P II lecture or equivalent. After an introduction, the following topics will be discussed: muscular, digestive, respiratory, circulatory, lymphatic, urinary, reproductive, and endocrine organ systems. This course cannot be used for credit toward a biology major or minor. Two hours laboratory per week. One credit hour.

BIOL 1305 Science Skills
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. This course will help biology, chemistry, and earth science students reach their educational objectives. Interactive instructional methods promote the development of skills that lead to success in college and a successful career in science. Students I) identify and use appropriate campus resources, 2) master common computer programs, 3) learn graphing and statistical methods, 4) develop better strategies to manage money, time, and stress wisely, and 5) explore the research conducted by UALR science faculty. Grading is based on projects, attendance, and participation. This course cannot be used for credit toward a biology, chemistry, or earth science major or minor. Three credit hours.

BIOL 1400 Evolutionary and Environmental Biology
Evolutionary, ecological, and environmental interrelationships among organisms. Basic biological principles and modern technology form the basis for inquiry and debate. The impact of society upon global biodiversity is examined from competing viewpoints. The role of science in shaping society and the influence of society upon science are evaluated. Students learn through reading, writing, computer simulations, videos, field exercises, and through participation in critical thinking and problem-solving activities. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week. Four credit hours.

BIOL 1401 Science of Biology
The process of science, including observation, evaluation, and predictions, will be applied to the understanding of biological principles. Illustration of the methods of science in the study of major biological concepts, including the cell theory, energy transformation, inheritance, and the theory of evolution. Selected biological systems will be surveyed to compare life forms and to examine related human issues. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week. Four credit hours. (ACTS Course Number BIOL 1014)

BIOL 1411 Introduction to Human Anatomy and Physiology I
The first semester of a two-semester course emphasizing the anatomy and physiology of the human organism. After an introduction, the following topics will be discussed: basic chemistry, cell biology, histology, integumentary system, skeletal system, nervous system, and sensory system. This course cannot be used for credit toward a biology major or minor. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week. Four credit hours. (ACTS Course Number BIOL 2404)

BIOL 1412 Introduction to Human Anatomy and Physiology II
Prerequisite: Biology 1411 or consent of instructor. The second semester of a two-semester course emphasizing the anatomy and physiology of the human organism. The muscular, digestive, respiratory, circulatory, lymphatic, urinary, reproductive, and endocrine organ systems will be covered during this term. This course cannot be used for credit toward a biology major or minor. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory. Four credit hours. (ACTS Course Number BIOL 2414)

BIOL 1413 Human Biology
A study of the structure and function of the human body, including the basic anatomy and physiology of the various body systems. Special attention will be given to methods of promoting and ensuring the well-being of the human organism. Designed for general students who want practical information about their bodies. This course is not intended for students majoring in nursing nor can it be used for credit toward a biology major or minor. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week. Four credit hours.

BIOL 2301 Environment and Man
A study of the relationship between humans and the natural environment. Characteristic animal and plant life in broad areas of nature and the influence individuals exert on these organisms; population and environmental problems humans have created, with the possible implications for the future and corrections which must be faced. Three hours lecture. Credit not applicable toward a biology major. Three credit hours.

BIOL 2400 Human Microbiology
A study of microbiological principles and those microorganisms relating to humans and their environment. This course is designed for associate degree health related programs and is not recommended to meet the requirements for a baccalaureate degree in health related professions. This course can not be used for credit toward a biology major or minor. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week. Four credit hours.

BIOL 2401 Microbiology
Prerequisites: BIOL 1400 or 1401, or 1411 and 1412, AND CHEM 1400 or 1402, or their equivalents. The morphology, physiology, and classification of microorganisms; the relationship of microorganisms to biotechnology, medicine, and nursing. Two hours lecture, four hours laboratory per week. Four credit hours. (ACTS Course Number BIOL 2004)

BIOL 2402 Botany
Prerequisite: BIOL 1400 or 1401 or equivalent. The structure and function of plants at the molecular, cellular, and organismal levels; survey of major plant groups. Two hours lecture, four hours laboratory per week. Four credit hours. (ACTS Course Number BIOL 1034)

BIOL 2403 Zoology
Prerequisite: BIOL 1400 or 1401 or equivalent. A survey of the animal kingdom from microscopic forms to mammals. Acquaints the student with the nature of animals. A study of general principles including taxonomy, organ systems, similarities of structure, function, and behavior of animals. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week. Four credit hours. (ACTS Course Number BIOL 1054)

BIOL 3100 Genetics Laboratory
Prerequisite or corequisite: BIOL 3300. Selected experiments in genetics to emphasize techniques, analysis, and interpretation of the principles of inheritance in plants and animals. Two hours laboratory per week. One credit hour.

BIOL 3103 Principles of Ecology Lab
Prerequisite or corequisite: BIOL 3303. Basic methods and materials of ecological research. Two hours laboratory. One credit hour.

BIOL 3300 Genetics
Prerequisites: 12 hours of biology to include BIOL 1400 or 1401 or equivalent, four hours of chemistry; microbiology is recommended. Basic principles and theories of inheritance with applications to plant, animal, and human heredity. Emphasis on roles of DNA and RNA and the genetics of microorganisms. Three hours lecture per week. Three credit hours.

BIOL 3303 Principles of Ecology
Prerequisites: BIOL 1400 or 1401, 2402 or 2403, or their equivalents. Recommended co-requisite: BIOL 3103. Principles of Ecology Lab. An introduction to living organisms and relationships to their environment including the structure and interactions of populations, communities, ecosystems, and the biosphere. Three hours lecture per week. Three credit hours.

BIOL 3313 Human Genetics
Prerequisites: BIOL 1400 and 1401 or BIOL 1411 and 1412 or the consent of the instructor. The basic concepts and mechanisms of human genetics in relationship to human uniqueness; impact on advances in healthcare, biotechnology; public policy, and the law. Study of genetics technology for detecting, treating, and preventing genetic disorders. This course cannot be used for credit toward a biology major or minor. Three hours lecture per week. Three credit hours.

BIOL 3391 Cooperative Education in Biology
Prerequisites: junior standing, acceptance as a biology major, minimum GPA of 2.50, and consent of the department chairperson. Cooperative education seeks to integrate academic and professional work experience. Students will be placed in a work setting consistent with their biological career objectives. This course requires a minimum of 200 semester work hours. No more than six hours independent study, undergraduate research, and/or cooperative education may be counted for biology elective credit (See “Independent Research and Study” on page 35). Three credit hours.

BIOL 3400 Developmental Biology
Prerequisites: BIOL 1400 or 1401, 2403 or their equivalents. The development of organisms including the topics of gametogenesis, fertilization, cleavage, morphogenesis, organogenesis, cell differentiation, and regeneration. These topics will be approached from both the structural point of view of classical embryology and the more recent molecular mechanistic viewpoint. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week. Four credit hours.

BIOL 3402 Mammalian Anatomy
Prerequisite: BIOL 2403. A study of the gross anatomy of mammalian organ systems with emphasis being placed on the human organism. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week. Four credit hours.

BIOL 3404 Comparative Vertebrate Morphology
Prerequisites: BIOL1400 or 1401, 2403, or their equivalents. The comparative anatomy of selected vertebrate animals; homologous structures in various animal groups. Two hours lecture, four hours laboratory per week. Four credit hours.

BIOL 3405 Invertebrate Zoology
Prerequisites: BIOL 1400 or 1401, 2403, or their equivalents. Comparative anatomy, physiology, embryology, adaptive radiation, and evolutionary relationships of invertebrate groups. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week. Four credit hours.

BIOL 3407 Plant Morphology
Prerequisites: BIOL 1400 or 1401, 2402, or their equivalents. A lecture-laboratory course covering the fundamental morphological characteristics of plants. The life histories and habits of the major plant groups are covered. Two hours lecture, four hours laboratory per week. Four credit hours.

BIOL 3408 Vertebrate Histology
Prerequisites: BIOL 1400 or 1401, 2403, or BIOL 1411 and 1412, or their equivalents. A study of the cell and fundamental tissues; the microscopic structure of the organ systems of representative vertebrates, and emphasis on the relationship between microscopic structure and function. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week. Four credit hours.

BIOL 3409 Vertebrate Zoology
Prerequisites: BIOL 1400 or 1401, 2403, or their equivalents. A general study of vertebrates, including adaptations, reproduction, behavior, distribution, ecology, and taxonomy. Emphasis on Arkansas species and field studies. Two hours lecture, four hours laboratory per week. Four credit hours.

BIOL 3411 Dendrology
Prerequisites: BIOL 1400 or 1401, 2402, or their equivalents. Detailed coverage of tree and other woody plant identification, recognition, classification, silvics, range, economic use, and wildlife value of native and introduced North American species. Two hours lecture, four hours laboratory per week. Four credit hours.

BIOL 3199, 3299, 3399, 3499 Special Topics
Prerequisites: variable, depending on instructor and course content. Each special topics course must first be approved by the biology department, which will also decide if biology credit will be granted. The topics will represent specialized areas of study in the biological sciences. Credit will vary and will depend on the amount of time necessary to cover the topic. One to four hours lecture. One, two, three, or four credit hours.

BIOL 4190 Biology Seminar
Prerequisites: senior standing and completion of or concurrent enrollment in biology core courses. Preparation and presentation of papers including analysis and implications of investigations in the biological sciences. Required of all majors. One hour per week. One credit hour.

BIOL 4201 AIDS
Prerequisites: BIOL 1400 or 1401, junior class standing, or consent of the instructor. Graduate standing required if student enrolled in BIOL 5201. A study of the disease AIDS. This will include cell biology, the disease process, and the social, economic, legal, and political aspects related to the disease and society. This course cannot be used for credit toward a biology major or minor. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as BIOL 5201. Two hours lecture per week. Two credit hours.

BIOL 4100, 4200, 4300 Independent Study
Prerequisites: senior standing, at least 20 hours in biology, and consent of the instructor. For students who wish to conduct library studies, curate museum collections, help faculty with a variety of special projects, or perform other activities. The student is expected to spend two to four hours per week on the project for each hour of credit earned. The exact hourly commitment per week will depend on the nature of the project and will be agreed on in advance by the student and instructor. No more than six hours independent study, cooperative education, and/or undergraduate research may be counted for biology elective credit (See “Independent Research and Study”). One, two, or three credit hours.

BIOL 4305 Animal Behavior
Prerequisites: BIOL 1400 or 1401, 2403. Graduate standing required to enroll in 5305. Description of the known behavior of various vertebrate and invertebrate phyla with emphasis on adaptive significance. Special attention to mating, defensive, nutritive, and social behavior. The ontogeny of behavioral patterns will be presented where known. Behavior will be related to the ecology of various animal populations. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as BIOL 5305. Three hours lecture per week. Three credit hours.

BIOL 4308 Wildlife Management
Prerequisites: BIOL 1400 or 1401, 2403, or their equivalents. Wildlife conservation and management. Ecology, program development, and management of wildlife in relation to the objectives of consumptive and nonconsumptive interest groups. Three hours lecture per week. Three credit hours.

BIOL 4309 Wildlife Management Techniques
Prerequisites: BIOL 1400 or 1401, 2403. Techniques and equipment used to obtain biological information needed to manage wildlife on a scientific basis. Fundamental procedures of planning and conducting wildlife investigations. One hour lecture, six hours laboratory per week. Three credit hours.

BIOL 4310 Evolution
Prerequisites: BIOL 1400 or 1401 and junior standing. Graduate standing required if student enrolled in 5310. Basic principles of evolutionary biology are covered, including: Darwinian Theory, principles of inheritance, micro-evolution and speciation processes. The evolution of humans is also discussed. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as BIOL 5310. Three hours lecture per week. Three credit hours.

BIOL 4311 Neurobiology
Prerequisites: 16 hours in biology or consent of instructor; CHEM 1401 or 1403 strongly encouraged. This course examines the functioning of the nervous system, with emphasis on vertebrates—in particular, humans. The course covers the structure and function of neurons as the fundamental unit of the nervous system, functional neuroanatomy, and the basic principles of nervous system development. Three hours lecture per week. Three credit hours.

BIOL 4312 Population and Community Ecology
Prerequisites: BIOL 3303 and at least junior standing. Graduate standing required if student enrolled in BIOL 5312. Basic principles of population ecology will be discussed, including niche concept, demography, population growth and regulation, life history patterns, sociality, competition, predation, mutualisms, and control of community structure. Dual Listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as BIOL 5312. Three hours lecture per week. Three credit hours.

BIOL 4314 Soil Biology
Prerequisites: BIOL 1400 or BIOL 1401, BIOL 2401, and BIOL 2403; Successful completion of BIOL 3303 is strongly recommended. If taken for graduate credit, the prerequisites also include a BS in biology or permission of the instructor. Concepts of soils are presented with emphasis on biological processes and soil/ecosystem relationships. Hands-on laboratory exercises and field exercises will supplement course lectures. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as BIOL 5314. Three hours lecture per week. Three credit hours.

BIOL 4315 Toxicology
Prerequisites: BIOL 1401, BIOL 2401, and BIOL 2403 ; Successful completion of BIOL 3402 or BIOL 4413 is strongly recommended. If taken for graduate credit, the prerequisites also include a BS in biology or permission of the instructor. Principles of toxicology are presented with an emphasis on toxicokinetics and toxicity mechanisms. Laboratory testing, risk analysis, and study design requirements are applied to various settings. Lectures will be supplemented with case studies. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as BIOL 5315. Three hours lecture per week. Three credit hours.

BIOL 4189, 4289, 4389 Undergraduate Research
Prerequisites: junior standing, at least 20 hours in biology, consent of the instructor. Students will design and conduct an independent scientific investigation. A paper reporting on the project in journal format is required for completion of the course. The student is expected to spend two to four hours per week on the project for each hour of credit earned. The exact hourly commitment per week will depend on the nature of the project and will be agreed upon in advance by the student and instructor. No more than six hours independent study, cooperative education, and/or undergraduate research may be counted for biology elective credit (See “Independent Research and Study”). One, two, or three credit hours.

BIOL 4391 Cooperative Education in Biology
Prerequisites: senior standing, acceptance as a biology major, minimum GPA of 2.50, completion of BIOL 3391, and consent of the department chairperson. Cooperative education seeks to integrate academic and professional work experience. Students will be placed in a work setting consistent with their biological career objectives. This course requires a minimum of 200 semester work hours. No more than six hours independent study, undergraduate research, and/or cooperative education may be counted for biology elective credit (See “Independent Research and Study”). Three credit hours.

BIOL 4401 Cell Biology
Prerequisites: BIOL 1400 or 1401, 12 additional hours in biology, CHEM 1401 or 1403; microbiology is strongly encouraged. A study of the organization of cells as related to the structure and function of biological molecules. Emphasis is placed on eukaryotic cells. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as BIOL 5401. Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory per week. Four credit hours.

BIOL 4402 Limnology
Prerequisites: BIOL 1400 or 1401, 2402, 2403, 3303, CHEM 1403, or equivalents. A study of physical and chemical characteristics of water, morphometry and physiography of lake and stream basins and an introduction to the ecology and taxonomy of aquatic communities. Laboratory: Instruction in methods of physical, chemical, and biological sampling and analysis. Field work will include study of various types of aquatic habitats and sampling methods involved. Some extended Saturday field trips will be required. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as BIOL 5402. Two lectures, one four-hour laboratory per week. Four credit hours.

BIOL 4403 Comparative Physiology
Prerequisites: BIOL 1400 or 1401, 2403, CHEM 1403, or the equivalents. Organ function in a wide range of organisms, including vertebrates and invertebrates. A comprehensive survey of functional relationships in more than one group of animals. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as BIOL 5403. Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory per week. Four credit hours.

BIOL 4404 Mammalogy
Prerequisites: BIOL 1400 or 1401, 2403, 3404 or 3409, or their equivalents, or consent of instructor. Classification, distribution, ecology, and natural history of mammals. Emphasis on Arkansas species. Field studies, preparation of study specimens. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as BIOL 5404. Two hours lecture, four hours laboratory per week. Four credit hours.

BIOL 4405 Ichthyology
Prerequisites: BIOL 1400 or 1401, 3404 or 3409. Classification, phylogeny, morphology, physiology, and ecology of fishes concentrating on North American and Arkansas freshwater fishes. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as BIOL 5405. Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory. Four credit hours.

BIOL 4406 Pathogenic Microbiology
Prerequisites: BIOL 1400 or 1401, 2401, or their equivalents. Survey of pathogenic microbiology, immunology, and virology with emphasis on fundamental principles of each science and their application to the diagnosis and control of human diseases. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as BIOL 5406. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week. Four credit hours.

BIOL 4407 Herpetology
Prerequisites: BIOL 1400 or 1401, 3403, 3404 or 3409, or their equivalents, or consent of instructor. Classification, anatomy, distribution, ecology, and natural history of amphibians and reptiles. Field techniques, student projects, laboratory work, and curatorial training will emphasize species found in Arkansas. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as BIOL 5407. Two hours lecture, four hours laboratory per week. Four credit hours.

BIOL 4408 Advanced Field Biology
Prerequisites: BIOL 1400 or 1401, 2402, 2403, 3303, 3409, or their equivalents. An analysis of major ecological habitats. Comparison of these areas with respect to their physiographic floral and faunal components. Emphasis on vertebrates. Students will spend an extended time in the field. Enrollment is by application only, and a separate field fee is charged. Ninety hours of lecture/laboratory/field trip activity. Four credit hours.

BIOL 4409 Plant Taxonomy
Prerequisites: BIOL 1400 or 1401, 2402 or their equivalents. A study of the principles of plant identification, classification, systematics, and nomenclature. Major families of flowering plants with emphasis on the floristics of the immediate area. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as BIOL 5409. Two hours lecture, four hours laboratory. Four credit hours.

BIOL 4410 Fisheries
Prerequisites: BIOL 1400 or 1401, 2403, 3303 or 3409, or their equivalents, or consent of instructor. A survey of fish management and fish culture principles and techniques including population assessment, habitat improvement, pond culture, commercial fish farming, and an introduction to fish diseases. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as BIOL 5410. Three hours of lecture, three hours laboratory per week. Four credit hours.

BIOL 4411 Ornithology
Prerequisites: 16 hours in biology to include BIOL 2403. This course is designed to introduce students to selected aspects of avian biology. Emphasis is placed on ecology, evolutionary biology, natural history, and classification of birds. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week. Weekend field trips. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as BIOL 5411. Four credit hours.

BIOL 4412 Plant Ecology
Prerequisites: BIOL 1400 or 1401, 2402 or 2403, 3303, or their equivalents. Study of plant species ecology (life history and reproductive biology) and vegetation ecology (abundance, structure, dispersion, patterns, and dynamics), with emphasis on quantitative methodology and management principles. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as BIOL 5412. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week. Four credit hours.

BIOL 4413 Immunology
Prerequisites: BIOL 1400 or 1401, 2401, CHEM 1402, 1403. Immunobiology and immunochemistry of humoral and cellular mechanisms of immunity. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as BIOL 5413. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week. Four credit hours.

BIOL 4414 Biological Methods and Instrumentation
Prerequisites: junior standing (60 hours to include 20 hours of biology including 2401, 3300), eight hours of chemistry. A hands-on study of modern biological experimentation. Designed to allow students to perform experiments using radioisotopes, electrophoresis, centrifugation, chromatography, RIA, ELISA, respirometry, enzyme assays and spectrophometric analysis, with an emphasis on computer analysis of data. Each student will complete an individual research project. Two hours lecture, four hours laboratory. Four credit hours.

BIOL 4415 Biometry
Prerequisites: 12 hours of biology, environmental health science, or earth science (in combination or singularly); MATH 1302 or higher numbered mathematics course; three hours of statistics; or consent of instructor. Graduate standing required if student enrolled in 5415. A computer based course in experimental design, data analysis, and interpretation. The objective of the course is to teach the application of statistical procedures relevant to the academic emphasis of students, not statistics per se. Designed to be especially beneficial to those students planning to seek an advanced degree upon completion of their baccalaureate or to go into quality control or research positions. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as BIOL 5415. Two hours lecture and four hours laboratory. Four credit hours.

BIOL 4416 Microscopy
Prerequisites: 15 hours of biology. Graduate standing if student enrolled in 5416. A laboratory course in the fundamental theory and practical application of light and electron microscopy including specimen preparation, photomicrography, and digital computer image processing and enhancement. Topics include brightfield, darkfield, phase, differential interference, contrast, polarized and epi fluorescent light microscopy, and scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Strong emphasis is placed on experimental design and use of the microscope as an experimental tool. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as BIOL 5416. Two hours lecture, four hours laboratory per week. Four credit hours.

BIOL 4417 Molecular Biology
Prerequisites: 19 hours in biology including both BIOL 2401 and 3300; CHEM 1401 or 1403. Successful completion of either BIOL 3400 or 4401 is strongly encouraged. If taken for graduate credit, the prerequisites also include a BS in biology or permission of the instructor. A study of molecular biology theory and practice. Emphasis is on the study of model systems to understand the current approaches and laboratory techniques necessary to answer basic questions in current molecular biology. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as BIOL 5417. Two hours of lecture and four hours of laboratory per week. Four credit hours.

BIOL 4418 Biotechnology
Prerequisites: 19 hours of biology including 2401 and 3300; CHEM 1401 or 1403. BIOL 3400 and 4401 are strongly recommended. BIOL 4417 is also recommended or may be taken concurrently. A study of the applied science of biotechnology designed to introduce students to the elements of a biotechnological career. Topics range from traditional biotechnology such as animal and plant tissue culture to contemporary molecular biotechnology and the use of recombinant DNA technology and genetic engineering in research and industry. Emphasis will be placed on current biomedical, pharmaceutical, and agri/industrial applications. Graduate students must complete and defend a term paper. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as BIOL 5418. Two hours lecture, four hours laboratory per week. Four credit hours.

BIOL 4419 Plant Physiology
Prerequisites: BIOL 1400 or 1401, 2402, CHEM 2450, or their equivalents, or consent of instructor. Study of water relations, nutrition, and metabolism including photosynthesis, growth, and development. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as BIOL 5419. Two hours lecture, four hours laboratory per week. Four credit hours.

BIOL 4420 General Biochemistry
See CHEM 4420.

BIOL 4421 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS)
Prerequisites: ERSC 2320 or ENHS 4415 or BIOL 4309, or consent of instructor. This course introduces Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and the use of spatial data for problem-solving in science. The lecture portion of the course focuses on the data models used to represent spatial features and on the processes involved in creating, acquiring, analyzing, and displaying georeferenced information. The laboratory portion of the course employs a project-based methodology including applications from geology, biology, environmental science, and political science to foster basic GIS software proficiency. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as BIOL 5421. Two hours lecture per week, four laboratory hours. Four credit hours.

BIOL 4422 Mammalian Physiology
Prerequisites: BIOL 1400 or 1401, 2403, Chemistry 1403, and BIOL 2401 or their equivalents. General physiological principles and a treatment of functions and interrelations of mammalian systems. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as BIOL 5422. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory. Four credit hours.

BIOL 4423 Plant Anatomy
Prerequisites: BIOL 1400 or 1401, 2402, or their equivalents. Detailed coverage of the microscopic anatomy of all the organs of seed plants and a critical evaluation of the major tissue types found within these plant organs. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as BIOL 5423. Two hours lecture, four hours laboratory. Four credit hours.

BIOL 4424 Entomology
Prerequisites: BIOL 1400 or 1401, 2403, or their equivalents. A study of insects including their anatomy, physiology, behavior, development, diversity, classification, and economic importance. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as BIOL 5424. Two hours lecture, four hours laboratory. Four credit hours.

BIOL 4425 Forensic DNA
Prerequisites: 12 Hours of Biology to include BIOL 1400 or 1401, four hours of chemistry and Microbiology 2401 or consent of the instructor. Genetics is also highly recommended. A comprehensive review of biological principles applied to forensic DNA science, including sample recovery and handling, analytical techniques, and profile matching/exclusion. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as BIOL 5425. Two hours lecture; four hours laboratory per week. Four credit hours.

BIOL 4426 Plant and Human Nutrition
Prerequisites: BIOL 1401, BIOL 2402 and BIOL 2403. Plant nutrition refers to needs and uses of the basic chemical elements in the plants, which are essential for plant growth and development. Thus, plant nutrition is an area of fundamental importance for both basic sciences ( Plant physiology, Plant cell and molecular biology, Plant development) and applied sciences (Agronomy, Crop physiology, Horticulture, Human nutrition and health). Human nutrition refers to the needs and uses of the basic chemical elements and compounds in the human body, which are essential for human development and healthy life. This course will focus on (1) Plant nutrients; (2) The uptake and transport of mineral nutrients in plants; (3) Functions of mineral nutrients in the growth and development of plants; (4) Nutrient deficiency and toxicity; (5) Uptake, transport and functions of mineral nutrients in human body; (6) Plant nutrients and their relationships to the human health; (7) Functional foods; and (80 Green Medicine. This course is designed for students who want to pursue a degree or update their knowledge in areas of plants sciences, agriculture, food science and human nutrition. Dual-listed in UALR Graduate Catalog as BIOL 5426. Two hours lecture, and four hours laboratory and case study per week. Four credit hours.

BIOL 4427/5427 Tissue Engineering
Prerequisites: Microbiology (2401) and one of the following: Immunology (4413), or Cell Biology (4401), or Molecular Biology (4417), or Biotechnology (4419). Tissue engineering (TE) is defined as the development and manipulation of laboratory-grown molecules, cells, tissues, or organs to replace and/or support the function of injured body parts. TE applies the principles and methods of biology, stem cell biology, immunology, life sciences, physical sciences, engineering, cell and drug delivery, nanobiotechnology, bioinformatics to understand physiological systems and to modify and create cells and tissues for therapeutic applications. TE is highly interdisciplinary. TE has resulted in both clinically used and experimental therapies for structure tissue repair (e.g. skin, bone, cartilage, tendon, muscle, and blood vessel), for enhancing metabolic function (e.g. liver) for improved drug delivery (localized delivery of a drug), and as a vehicle for cell-based gene therapy. Two hours lectures and two hours laboratory per week. Four credit hours.

BIOL 4428/5428 Techniques in Molecular Biology
Prerequisites: BIOL 3300 or its equivalent. BIOL 4417 or BIOL
4401 is strongly encouraged. A course designed to give students technical skills and understanding of basic principles in molecular biology and biotechnology. It emphasizes experimental techniques necessary for studying biological systems at the molecular level. Techniques covered include recombinant DNA and protein techniques, forward and reverse genetics methods in studying gene functions, including virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) and online database mining. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as BIOL 5428. Two hours lecture and four hours laboratory per week. Four credit hours.

BIOL 4199-4499 Special Topics in Biology
Prerequisites: 20 hours in biology, consent of instructor; other prerequisites may be required depending on the topic. Specialized study in the biological sciences. Credit varies and depends on the depth of the course content. Each topic is appropriate for both advanced undergraduate and graduate students. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog at the 5000-level. One to four hours lecture per week combined with up to four hours laboratory. One, two, three, or four credit hours.

Courses in Gulf Coast Research Laboratory (BIOL)

BIOL 3450 Introduction to Marine Zoology
Prerequisite: eight hours of biological science. A general introduction to the marine environment with emphasis on local fauna. Introduction to the marine environment and some of its physical, chemical, geological, and ecological characteristics that affect marine life. Emphasis on local fauna and estuarine species. Four credit hours.

BIOL 3550 Oceanography II: Marine Biology
Prerequisite: eight credit hours of biological science. An overview of biological oceanography with emphasis on organisms, habitats, and fisheries of the Mississippi Sound and the Gulf of Mexico. Five credit hours.

BIOL 4151, 4251, 4351 Special Problems in Marine Science
Prerequisites: to be set by problem director. Special problems are research oriented, and grades are based on reports submitted by students. Students who want to take a special problems course must submit a brief proposal of planned study to the GCRL registrar. Special problems proposal forms are available from the GCRL registrar. This proposal must be approved by the student’s UALR advisor and the GCRL staff member directing the study. One, two, or three credit hours.

BIOL 4352 Coastal Vegetation
Prerequisite: 10 hours of biology including general botany. A broad study of the general and specific aspects of coastal vegetation, with emphasis on local examples such as tidal marshes, swamps, savannahs, woodlands, strand and island (insular) vegetation, and certain unique and peculiar areas. Vegetation composition, variation, succession, climax, and distribution, including survey and descriptive methods. Aerial techniques, ground truth, plant identification, delineation of vegetation types, and mapping. Three credit hours.

BIOL 4450 Marine Botany
Prerequisite: 10 credit hours of biology, including botany. A survey, based on local examples, of the principal groups of marine algae and marine flowering plants, treating structure, reproduction, distribution, identification, and ecology. Four credit hours.

BIOL 4451 Comparative Histology of Marine Organisms
Prerequisites: general histology, consent of instructor. A detailed study of the histological organization of representative marine organisms. Fixation, processing, and study of tissues using light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. The relationship between structural changes and physiological changes during life cycle of organism. Histopathology with respect to tissue responses to infection and damage by toxic agents. Four credit hours.

BIOL 4452 Marine Fisheries Management
Prerequisite: 16 hours of biological science or consent of instructor. Practical marine fishery management problems. Trends in human population numbers, aggregations, and life styles with associated environmental impacts and resource allocation implications, which pose complex problems for fishery management scientists and administrators. International and local legal, political, social, and economic factors, as well as biological potential, must be considered in making rational decisions toward achieving optimum yield from marine fishery resources. The history of management scheme successes and failures, sources of information, and the current status of fishing technology, mariculture, management methods, legal problems, and educational needs will be explored. Four credit hours.

BIOL 4453 Behavior and Neurobiology of Marine Animals
Prerequisite: 16 credit hours of zoology or consent of instructor. Survey of behavior, neuroanatomy, and neurophysiology of marine animals with emphasis on the neural mechanisms underlying the behavior of selected invertebrates, fishes, birds, and mammals. Introduction to the experimental study of the behavior of marine animals in the field and laboratory. When possible, students will carry out independent studies on local species. Neural mechanisms underlying behavior; the anatomy and physiology of the nervous systems of marine invertebrates and vertebrates. Four credit hours.

BIOL 4454 Fauna and Faunistic Ecology of Tidal Marshes
Prerequisite: 16 credit hours of biological science or consent of instructor. Survey and discussion of the taxonomy, distribution, trophic relationships, reproductive strategies, and adaptation of tidal marsh animals with emphasis on those occurring in northern Gulf marshes. Four credit hours.

BIOL 4455 Early Life History of Marine Fishes
Prerequisites: ichthyology, fisheries, biology, ecology, or consent of instructor. Reproductive strategies and early developmental processes of marine fishes. Includes discussion of temporal and spatial distribution patterns, population dynamics, and ecological interactions of fish eggs and larvae; role of early stages of fishes in fisheries oceanography, marine ecology, and systematics; methods of sampling and identifying fish eggs and larvae; data quantification and analysis; rearing experiments; techniques for studying larval fish dynamics. Four credit hours.

BIOL 4456 Salt Marsh Plant Ecology
Prerequisites: general botany, plant taxonomy, plant physiology, general ecology, or consent of instructor. Botanical aspects of local marshes. Plant identification, composition, structure, distribution, and development of coastal marshes. Biological and physical interrelationships. Primary productivity and relation of marshes to estuaries and associated fauna. Four credit hours.

BIOL 4550 Marine Microbiology
Prerequisites: general microbiology, consent of instructor. Introduction to marine microorganisms and pertinent literature sources. The role of microorganisms in the ecology of oceans and estuaries is stressed. Use of laboratory sampling equipment, methods of processing samples, and laboratory techniques useful in studying marine microorganisms. Five credit hours.

BIOL 4551 Marine Ecology
Prerequisite: 16 credit hours of biological science including general zoology, general botany, and invertebrate zoology. A consideration of the relationship of marine organisms to their environment. The effects of temperature, salinity, light, nutrient concentration, currents, food, predation, and competition on the abundance and distribution of marine organisms are considered. Five credit hours.

BIOL 4650 Marine Invertebrate Zoology
Prerequisites: 16 credit hours of zoology, including an introductory course in invertebrate zoology. A concentrated study of the important free-living marine and estuarine invertebrates of the Mississippi Sound and adjacent continental shelf of the northeastern Gulf of Mexico, with emphasis on the structure, classification, phylogenetic relationships, larval development, and functional processes. Six credit hours.

BIOL 4651 Marine Vertebrate Zoology and Ichthyology
Prerequisites: 16 credit hours of zoology including comparative morphology or consent of instructor. A general study of the marine chordata, with emphasis on fish including lower groups, mammals, and birds. Groups of vertebrates occurring in the area associated with marine environments, with taxonomic characteristics used in their classification and identification, and with functional adaptations of the organisms. Greatest emphasis is placed on local fishes. For obvious reasons, no conscious attempt is made to duplicate material which could be offered with ease to the student at his or her home institution. Every effort is made to take advantage of the unique teaching situation that the area provides. Six credit hours.

BIOL 4652 Parasites of Marine Animals
Prerequisites: general parasitology or consent of instructor. A study of the parasites of marine and estuarine animals with emphasis on morphology, taxonomy, life histories, and host-parasite relationships. Six credit hours.

BIOL 4653 Aquaculture
Prerequisites: 16 credit hours of biology, including invertebrate zoology, natural history of vertebrates, or ichthyology. A review of the technology, principles, and problems relating to the science of aquaculture, with emphasis on the culture of marine species. Six credit hours.

UAMS Molecular Biotechnology Courses (BIOM)

BIOM 3210 Laboratory Principles and Techniques
Prerequisite: admission to the professional program in medical technology or molecular biotechnology. Introduction to principles and techniques used in clinical and research laboratories. Emphasis on laboratory mathematics, safe practices, and basic instrumentation. Two hours lecture per week.

BIOM 3211 Introduction to Research
Prerequisite: admission to the professional program in medical technology or molecular biotechnology. How to design, conduct, and interpret life science research including planning biomedical research, the principles of statistical design, sample size estimation, and designs in life science research. Also includes the correspondence between objectives, design and analysis. Two lecture hours per week.

BIOM 4106 Technology Transfer
Prerequisites: admission to the professional program in molecular biotechnology and UALR BIOL 4417 and BIOL 4418. Overview of the conversion from research to manufacturing, including regulatory environment in which the production occurs. One hour lecture.

BIOM 4305 Cell Culture Principles and Techniques
Prerequisites: admission to the professional program in molecular biotechnology and UALR BIOL 4417 and BIOL 4418. Introduction to principles and techniques of cell culture. Explores protocols for the culture, cloning, and selection of cells. Includes basic cell biology, growth characteristics and requirements, cell passing, and quantitation. Two hours lecture, three hours laboratory per week.

BIOM 4507 Biotechnology Laboratory Internship
Prerequisites: admission to the professional program in molecular biotechnology and UALR BIOL 4417 and 4418. Supervised experience in a biotechnology research laboratory. Emphasis on manual and automated techniques and development of professional behavior. Includes research principles and techniques, laboratory organization, and materials management. Twenty clinic hours per week.

BSAD – Business First-Year Experience

BSAD 1300 Introduction to Business
No Prerequisites. BSAD 1300 is an introduction to business as a profession. It is designed to be team-taught by faculty from different areas of business to provide an overview of management in organizations, leadership, human resources, financial management, accounting, production, and marketing, as well as the global dimensions of business and their social responsibilities. The course includes industry visits and invited talks by business experts. The overarching goal of the course is to introduce the student to the various dimensions of business and to help them to identify areas of study that are of particular personal interest. Two hours lecture, one hour lab, three credit hours.

CHEM – Chemistry

CHEM 1100 Special Topics in the Laboratory for Transfer Students
Prerequisite: Grade of C or greater from another university in a class with lecture equivalent to CHEM 1400, CHEM 1401, CHEM 1402, or CHEM 1403. Intended for transient and transfer students who passed a lecture class without the accompanying laboratory. One three-hour laboratory session per week. One credit hour.

CHEM 1300 Preparation for General Chemistry
Prerequisite: MATH 1302. The class prepares students to take the placement examination required to enroll in CHEM 1402. The class is for students who need to sharpen mathematical, problem-solving, and critical thinking skills while developing chemical knowledge. There will be frequent and comprehensive assessments of learning. The class cannot be combined with CHEM 1100 to satisfy four hours of the laboratory science requirement in the core curriculum. Three hour-long lectures per week. Three credit hours.

CHEM 1305 Science Skills
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. This course will help biology, chemistry, and earth science students reach their educational objectives. Interactive instructional methods promote the development of skills that lead to success in college and a successful career in science. Students I) identify and use appropriate campus resources, 2) master common computer programs, 3) learn graphing and statistical methods, 4) develop better strategies to manage money, time, and stress wisely, and 5) explore the research conducted by UALR science faculty. Grading is based on projects, attendance, and participation. This course cannot be used for credit toward a biology, chemistry, or earth science major or minor. Three credit hours.

CHEM 1400 Fundamental Chemistry I
Prerequisite: MATH 1302 with a grade of C or greater. The first in a two-course sequence designed to introduce students in the health related professions (nursing, dental hygiene, physical therapy, respiratory therapy
) to nomenclature, stoichiometry, measurement, periodicity, molecular structure, states of matter, energy, nuclear chemistry and redox and acid/base equilibria. Completing the two-course sequence qualifies students to enroll in CHEM 2450 but no other chemistry classes. This class meets ACTS criteria. Three hour long lectures and one three-hour long laboratory session per week. Four credit hours. (ACTS Course Number CHEM 1214)

CHEM 1401 Fundamental Chemistry II
Prerequisite: CHEM 1400 with a grade of C or greater. The class continues to build upon the knowledge foundation in chemistry and introduces organic nomenclature, functional group reactions, properties of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, nucleic acids, and enzymes and principles of metabolism. Completing the course qualifies students to enroll in CHEM 2450 but no other chemistry classes. This class meets ACTS criteria. Three hour long lectures and one three-hour laboratory session per week. Four credit hours. (ACTS Course Number CHEM 1224)

CHEM 1402 General Chemistry I
Prerequisite: MATH 1302 or higher level class, with a grade of C or greater. Students must also attain the minimum score on a placement examination to qualify for enrollment in CHEM 1402. Students who do not attain the minimum score may enroll in CHEM 1300. Finishing CHEM 1300 does not substitute for meeting the minimum score on the placement examination. The class builds upon a knowledge foundation in chemistry and offers inquiry into topics of scientific measurement, chemical nomenclature, expressing qualitative and quantitative statements about chemical reactions, qualitative atomic theory, electronic and molecular structure models, chemical periodicity, thermo-chemistry, gases, kinetic molecular theory, and nuclear chemistry. The class is designed for chemistry majors and others needing rigorous instruction. It meets ACTS criteria. Three hour-long lectures and one three-hour laboratory session per week. Four credit hours. (ACTS Course Number CHEM 1414)

CHEM 1403 General Chemistry II
Prerequisite: CHEM 1402 with a grade of C or greater. The class continues to build upon the knowledge foundation in chemistry and offers inquiry into topics of chemical equilibrium including acids and bases and sparingly soluble salts, thermodynamics, kinetics, electrochemistry, and coordination compounds. It meets ACTS criteria. Three hour-long lectures and one three-hour laboratory session per week. Four credit hours. (ACTS Course Number CHEM 1424)

CHEM 1406 General Chemistry for Engineers
This course is designed for Engineering Students. This one semester chemistry course will give engineering students key concepts and principles in chemistry needed for their basic background knowledge. This course is presented using engineering relevant examples and stresses applications in engineering and technology.

Note: Course Requirements. Consent of Instructor is required. This course has a prerequisite of 70 or higher score on a department placement test. Students who do not attain the minimum score may enroll in CHEM 1300. MATH 1311 Applied Calculus I, or MATH 1342 Business Calculus, or MATH 1451 Calculus I are prerequisite concurrent. Students completing 1406 and changing majors to chemistry may substitute CHEM 1406 for CHEM 1402. Students may not receive credit for both 1402 and 1403 by completing 1406. Three hour-lectures and one-three hour laboratory session per week. Four credit hours.

CHEM 1409 Chemistry and Society
The class develops a base of chemical knowledge for students to consider the impact chemistry has on the world while meeting the goals of the University’s core curriculum competencies in critical thinking, ethical and moral consciousness, historical consciousness, mathematics, and philosophy and methods of science. Material will address topics starting with the atomic and molecular foundations of chemistry to applying principles of scientific modeling to topics such as the environment, medicine and public policy. The class satisfies four hours of the University’s laboratory science curriculum requirement and meets ACTS criteria. Three hour-long lectures and one three-hour laboratory session per week. Four credit hours. (ACTS Course Number CHEM 1004)

CHEM 2310 Analytical Chemistry I
Prerequisite: CHEM 1403 with a grade of C or greater. The class investigates aqueous equilibrium systems including acid/base, complex species, solubility, and oxidation/reduction, statistical analysis of chemical data, classic titrimetric and gravimetric analysis, and laboratory report writing. Two hour-long lectures and one three-hour laboratory session per week. Three credit hours.

CHEM 2311 Analytical Chemistry II
Prerequisite: CHEM 2310 with a grade of C or greater. The class studies modern instrumental analysis and separation of chemical systems, to include electrochemical, spectroscopic and chromatographic methods. Two hours-long lectures and one three-hour laboratory session per week. Three credit hours.

CHEM 2450 Organic Survey
Prerequisite: CHEM 1401 or CHEM 1403 with a grade of C or greater. The class is appropriate for students needing a one-semester overview of organic chemistry. Topics include nomenclature, classification, synthetic pathways, and spectroscopy. Three hour-long lectures and one three hour laboratory session per week. Four credit hours.

CHEM 3150 Organic Chemistry Laboratory I
Prerequisite or corequisite: CHEM 3350 with a grade of C or greater. Organic compounds will be prepared and identified. Techniques include determining melting and boiling points, simple fractional and steam distillation, re-crystallization, and extraction. One three hour-long laboratory per week. One credit hour.

CHEM 3151 Organic Chemistry Laboratory II
Prerequisites or corequisites: CHEM 3351 and CHEM 3150 with grades of C or greater. This class continues to build the knowledge base of organic chemistry laboratory skills by introducing more advanced synthetic methodologies and characterization techniques including IR, NMR, MS and GC. BS chemistry majors should not enroll in this laboratory but in CHEM 3250. One three hour-long laboratory per week. One credit hour.

CHEM 3170 Physical Chemistry Laboratory I
Prerequisites or corequisites: PHYS 2122, CHEM 3370 with a grade of C or greater. An introduction to multivariate statistical methods and error analysis. Experiments include synthesis of compounds, measurement of physical and electrochemical properties, determination of heats of reaction and reaction rates, and superconductivity studies. Laboratory three hours per week. One credit hour.

CHEM 3171 Physical Chemistry Laboratory II
Prerequisites: CHEM 2311, 3170, 3370 with a grade of C or greater. Prerequisites or corequisites: CHEM 3371. Synthesis of inorganic compounds together with measurement of quantum mechanical spectroscopic properties, magnetic susceptibility, and properties of macromolecules. Laboratory three hours. One credit hour.

CHEM 3250 Qualitative Organic Analysis Laboratory
Prerequisite: CHEM 3350 and CHEM 3150 with grades of C or greater; Prerequisites or corequisites: CHEM 3351 with a grade of C or greater. The class continues to build the knowledge base of organic chemistry laboratory techniques by requiring complex analytical problem solving ability along with advanced laboratory skills. Students receive unknown organic compounds and identify them by preparing and characterizing derivatives using IR, NMR, MS, and CG. BS chemistry majors should take this laboratory instead of CHEM 3151. Two three hour-long laboratories per week. Two credit hours.

CHEM 3340 Introduction to Inorganic Chemistry
Prerequisite: CHEM 2450 or 3350 with a grade of C or greater. A study of inorganic chemistry with emphasis on chemical bonding theories (both covalent and ionic molecules), periodic properties with isolation and synthesis associated with few main group elements, acid/base concepts, introduction to transition metals, coordination complexes (name, structures, isomers, chelate effects). Required for BA and BS majors. Lecture three hours per week. Three credit hours.

CHEM 3350 General Organic Chemistry I
Prerequisite: CHEM 1403 with a grade of C or greater. The first in a two-course sequence designed to introduce science students to organic compounds. Topics include nomenclature, alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, halides, alcohols, ethers, functional groups, stereochemistry, acid-base concepts, organometallics, multiple-step synthesis, and reaction mechanisms, Three hour-long lectures. Three credit hours.

CHEM 3351 General Organic Chemistry II
Prerequisite: CHEM 3350 with a grade of C or greater. The class continues to build the knowledge base of organic chemistry by adding conjugated systems, aromatic compounds, carbonyl compounds, carboxylic acids and derivatives, amines, phenols, aryl halides, spectroscopy and data interpretation. Three hour-long lectures. Three credit hours.

CHEM 3370 Physical Chemistry: Thermodynamics and Kinetics
Prerequisites: CHEM 2311 with a grade of C or greater. Prerequisites or corequisites: MATH 1452, PHYS 2322. An introduction to theoretical chemistry to include the study of gases and condensed phases, phase changes, solutions, chemical reactions, and reaction rates. Lecture three hours per week. Three credit hours.

CHEM 3371 Physical Chemistry: Quantum and Statistical Mechanics
Prerequisites: CHEM 2311 with a grade of C or greater. Prerequisites or corequisites: MATH 2453, PHYS 2322. An introduction to theoretical chemistry to include the study of quantum and statistical mechanics of atomic and molecular systems. Lecture three hours per week. Three credit hours.

CHEM 3572 Physical Chemistry for the Life Sciences
Prerequisites: CHEM 2311, MATH 1451, PHYS 1322 and 1122 with a grade of C or greater. An introduction to theoretical chemistry, with emphasis on the application of physical laws to biochemical systems, such as purified proteins and nucleic acids. Topics include spectroscopic techniques, thermodynamics, and kinetics. Lecture three hours, recitation one hour, and laboratory three hours per week. Five credit hours.

CHEM 4190 Chemistry Seminar
Presentation of papers, discussion, analysis, and implications of experimental investigations in the natural sciences. Seminar serves as the capstone course for assessment. Required of senior chemistry majors in their final semester before graduation. One hour per week. One credit hour.

CHEM 4251 Organic Preparation
Prerequisite: CHEM 3151 or 3250 with a grade of C or greater. Advanced experiments in organic chemistry employing special apparatus and techniques. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as CHEM 5251. Two three-hour laboratories per week. Two credit hours.

CHEM 4330 History of Chemistry
Prerequisite: CHEM 3350 with a grade of C or greater. This course is a survey of the growth and development of chemistry. Lectures will stress connections of modern chemistry to past chemists/scientists and how ideas are passed from generation to generation. The personality and human side of the scientists will be emphasized along with the interactions between science and society. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as CHEM 5330. Students who have completed CHEM 4330 may not enroll in CHEM 5330. Three credit hours.

CHEM 4340 Inorganic Chemistry
Prerequisites: CHEM 3340, 3371 with a grade of C or greater (the latter may be taken as a corequisite). A theoretical treatment of inorganic chemistry to include atomic structure, valence bond, molecular orbital and ligand field theories; the crystalline state; thermodynamic and kinetic aspects of transition metal chemistry. Laboratory will reinforce concepts developed in lecture. Required for the BS major. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as CHEM 5340. Lecture two hours and laboratory three hours per week. Three credit hours.

CHEM 4342 Environmental Chemistry
Prerequisites: CHEM 3350 and CHEM 2310 with a grade of C or greater. A survey of environmental chemistry. Topics covered will include: Composition of the atmosphere and behavior; energy and climate; principles of photochemistry and atmospheric chemistry; petroleum and coal chemistry and associated environmental problems; chemistries of soaps and surfactants; haloorganics and pesticides, water and air pollution (tropospheric and stratospheric) and connections to climate change; elemental and molecular environmental chemistry in geological media; water cycle and water treatment; principles of nuclear chemistry and radiochemistry; nuclear environmental chemistry; and evaluation of energy sources that are sustainable. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as CHEM 5342. Students who have completed CHEM 4342 may not enroll in CHEM 5342. Lecture three hours a week. Three credit hours.

CHEM 4350 Intermediate Organic Chemistry
Prerequisite: CHEM 3351 with a grade of C or greater. An elective course designed for students with special interests in organic chemistry who wish exposure to additional concepts beyond those covered in CHEM 3350, 3351. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as CHEM 5350. Lecture three hours per week. Three credit hours.

CHEM 4360 Medicinal Chemistry
Prerequisites: CHEM 3351; and CHEM 3150 and CHEM 3151, or CHEM 3250; all with grades of C or greater. This course will serve as an introduction to the chemistry and theory of drug action that includes general drug design, drug-receptor interactions, drug design through enzyme inhibition, pharmacokinetics, and drug metabolism. Additionally the mechanism of specific drug classes will be examined. This course cannot be used as a substitute for the biochemistry requirement of the ACS certified degree. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as CHEM 5360. Lecture three hours per week. Three credit hours.

CHEM 4380 Introduction to Polymer Chemistry
Prerequisite: CHEM 3351, 3151 or 3250 with a grade of C or greater Other courses recommended but not required are CHEM 3370, 3371, 3170, 3171, and 3572. Theoretical and practical aspects of polymer chemistry will be coordinated. Topics include history, types of polymerizations, kinetics, molecular weight, physical properties including thermal and spectroscopic characterization, biopolymers and engineering resins. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as CHEM 5380. Lecture two hours, laboratory three hours. Three credit hours.

CHEM 4399 Special Topics in Chemistry
Prerequisite: consent of instructor. A course for students interested in acquiring additional knowledge in selected topics in chemistry. Possible subjects include: chemical carcinogenesis, environmental chemistry, solid state chemistry, radiochemistry, macromolecules, surface chemistry, quantum chemistry, or others. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as CHEM 5399. Lecture three hours per week. Three credit hours.

CHEM 4100, 4200, 4300, 4400 Independent Study
Prerequisites: junior or senior standing, consent of the chairperson. Designed for students who want to carry out special investigations, which could include chemical education research or directed study of a specialized chemical topic of interest to the student. Topic and method of procedure must have approval of the supervising faculty member. Frequent conferences with the instructor and a study of chemical literature with a final written report are required. The student is expected to spend four to six hours per week on the project for each hour of credit earned. The exact hourly commitment per week will depend on the nature of the project and will be agreed on in advance by the student and the instructor. One, two, three, or four credit hours.

CHEM 4411 Instrumental Analysis
Prerequisites: CHEM 2311, 3350; PHYS 2322, 2122 or 1322, 1122 with consent of instructor with a grade of C or greater. A study of the most common modern instrumental methods of analysis, to include topics in spectroscopy, electrochemistry, and chromatography. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as CHEM 5411. Lecture three hours, one four-hour laboratory per week. Four credit hours.

CHEM 4420 Biochemistry
Prerequisites: CHEM 2310, 3151, 3351 with a grade of C or greater. A basic course covering the chemistry and metabolism of proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, and nucleic acids, and the action of vitamins, hormones, and enzymes. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as CHEM 5420. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. Four credit hours.

CHEM 4321 Biochemistry II
Prerequisites: CHEM 4420 or 5420 with a grade of C or greater. Continuation of Biochemistry I, covering energy generation, metabolism of lipids and amino acids, integration of metabolism, DNA replication and repair, transcription, translation, and control of gene expression. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as CHEM 5321. Students who have completed CHEM 432 may not enroll in CHEM 5321. Lecture three hours per week. Three credit hours.

CHEM 4289, 4389, 4489 Undergraduate Research
Prerequisites: consent of department chairperson, junior or senior standing, compliance with approved guidelines (available from chairperson) and comments in the printed schedule. Trains the student to analyze, plan, and conduct experimental work on a chemical problem. Frequent conferences and a study of chemical literature with a final written report are required. The student is expected to spend four to six hours per week on the project for each hour of credit earned. The exact hourly commitment per week will depend on the nature of the project and will be agreed on in advance by the student and the instructor. Two, three, or four credit hours.

CHIN – Chinese

CHIN 1311 Elementary Mandarin Chinese I
A course for beginners with no knowledge of Mandarin Chinese. Instruction in correct pronunciation, aural comprehension, and simple speaking ability leading to active mastery of basic grammar and a limited reading ability. Chinese culture is also introduced. Three credit hours.

CHIN 1312 Elementary Mandarin Chinese II
Prerequisite: CHIN 1311 or equivalent. Continuation of CHIN 1311. Three credit hours.

CHIN 2311 Intermediate Mandarin Chinese
Prerequisite: CHIN 1312 or equivalent. A continuation of CHIN 1312, the intermediate course leads to greater facility in the spoken language and to more advanced reading skills. Three credit hours.

CLNG – Classical Language

CLNG 1301 Elementary Classical Language I
Offered in a designated classical language in response to student interest. Introduction to the grammar of a designated classical language. Elementary reading and translation in selected texts. Three credit hours.

CLNG 1302 Elementary Classical Language II
Prerequisite: CLNG 1301 in specified classical language or equivalent. Continuation of Classical Language 1301. Three credit hours.

CLNG 1311 Elementary Biblical Hebrew
Introduction to the grammar of biblical Hebrew. Elementary reading in selected biblical texts. Three credit hours.

CLNG 1312 Biblical Hebrew Reading
Prerequisite: CLNG 1311 or consent of instructor. Reading of selected biblical prose texts, leading toward development of rapid reading ability. Three credit hours.

CLNG 2301 Intermediate Classical Language I
Prerequisite: CLNG 1302 or equivalent. Readings from the works of classical authors providing an introduction to the literature of the ancient world. Three credit hours.

CLNG 2302 Intermediate Classical Language II
Prerequisite: CLNG 2301 or equivalent. Readings from the works of classical authors to prepare students for studies of prose and poetry written during the flowering of ancient civilizations. Three credit hours.

CLNG 3311 Advanced Biblical Hebrew
Prerequisite: CLNG 1312. Selected readings of poetic texts in the Hebrew Bible. Investigation of poetic syntax and meter. Three credit hours.

CNMG – Construction Management and Construction Engineering

In general, courses are offered only in the term that is indicated in the course description. However, courses may be offered in other terms if sufficient student demand exists and if qualified instructors are available.

CNMG 1101 First-Year Colloquium in Construction
An introduction to construction engineering and construction management, along with goal setting, time management, and the on- and off-campus resources needed for success at UALR. Hands-on activities and group projects explore various concepts in construction. Satisfies the UALR First Year Colloquium requirement. Two hours lab. One credit hour. Fall only.

CNMG 1201 The Construction Industry
Introduction to the construction industry and the career opportunities available within residential, building, heavy civil, and industrial construction. The different roles of the various participants are examined along with industry history and traditions. Proper dress and safety requirements for office and field site visits discussed. Includes guest speakers, field trips, and project site visits. One hour lecture, three hours lab. Two credit hours. Fall only.

CNMG 1305 Drawings and Specifications
Introduction to basic construction drawings and specification interpretation. Emphasis on construction drawings and blueprint reading, CSI specifications and master format, project manual, shop drawings, as-built drawings, and proper construction terminology. Two hours lecture, two hours lab. Three credit hours. Fall only.

CNMG 1313 Civil Engineering Materials with Lab
Prerequisites: CHEM 1402 or 1406, and MATH 1451, or consent of instructor. Properties of materials and materials science, including atomic structure and bonding, lattice structures and defects, grain structure, alloys, and phase diagrams. Construction engineering materials, including steel, aluminum, aggregates, portland cement, concrete, masonry, asphalt, wood, and composites. Two hours lecture, two hours lab. Three credit hours. Fall only.

CNMG 2303 Construction Practicum
Prerequisite concurrent: CNMG 1305 or consent of instructor. Construction methods and hands-on projects related to foundations, framing, doors, windows, finish carpentry, and masonry. Two hours lecture, two hours lab. Three credit hours. Spring only.

CNMG 2304 MEP Practicum
Prerequisite concurrent: CNMG 1305 or consent of instructor. Construction methods and hands-on projects related to interior and exterior finishes, thermal and moisture protection, plumbing, and electrical wiring. Two hours lecture, two hours lab. Three credit hours. Fall only.

CNMG 2313 Construction Materials and Methods
Prerequisite concurrent: CNMG 1305 or consent of instructor. Introduction to specifications, standards, codes, quality control, and quantity survey as they pertain to the execution of selected construction materials. Topics include site work, concrete, masonry, steel, rough and finish carpentry, thermal and moisture protection, doors and windows, finishes, and specialties. Two hours lecture, two hours lab. Three credit hours. Spring only.

CNMG 2314 Mechanical, Electrical, and Plumbing (MEP) Systems
Prerequisite concurrent: CNMG 1305 or consent of instructor. Introduction to functions of service systems within a modern structure. Includes heating, ventilating, air-conditioning (HVAC), plumbing, fire protection, electrical, and conveying systems. Two hours lecture, two hours lab. Three credit hours. Fall only.

CNMG 2316 Construction Surveying with Lab
Prerequisite: CNMG 1305 and MATH 1303 or 1401, or consent of instructor. Introduction to the principles of construction surveying, project layout, and field performance and surveying equipment management. Topics will include use and care of surveying instruments, directions, angles, surveying calculations, errors, and computations of areas and volumes. Two hours lecture, three hours lab. Three credit hours. Spring only.

CNMG 2318 Building Information Modeling
Prerequisite: CNMG 2313, or consent of instructor. The course will focus on utilizing basic functions of Building Information Modeling (BIM) for residential and commercial construction. During the course, students will examine geometry, spatial relationships, geographic information, quantities and properties of building components. Students will create virtual models of buildings that can be used for quantity take offs. Two hours lecture, two hours lab. Three credit hours. Spring only.

CNMG 2330 Introduction to Sustainability
This interdisciplinary course introduces students to the concept of sustainability and the greatest sustainability challenges of our time related to natural, social, built, and managed systems. Students will study each module in class, prepare a research presentation related to one topic module, and participate in a community engagement service learning project related to one module. The course will challenge students to take action toward increased personal sustainability and responsibility. Three hours lecture, Three credit hours. Cross-listed as MGMT 2330 and POLS 2330.

CNMG 2370 Engineering Statics
Prerequisite: PHYS 2321 or consent of instructor. Prerequisite concurrent: MATH 2453 or consent of instructor. Static equilibrium of particles, equivalent systems of forces, equilibrium of rigid bodies, centroids and centers of gravity, analysis of structures, dry friction, and moments of inertia. Two hours lecture. Two hours lab. Three credit hours. Cross listed as SYEN 2370. Fall only.

CNMG 2274 Thermal and Fluid Engineering
Prerequisites: CHEM 1406, MATH 1452, and PHYS 2321, or consent of instructor. An integrated introduction to thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, and heat transfer. Topics include thermodynamic properties, the laws of thermodynamics, cycles, and psychrometrics; conservation of mass, momentum, and energy in fluid flow; introduction to conduction, convection, and radiation heat transfer. One hour lecture. Three hours lab. Two credit hours. Fall only.

CNMG 2199, 2299, 2399 Special Topics in Construction
Prerequisites: consent of instructor based on relevance of subject matter to student career goals. Designed to meet special needs of students or industry to cover application of construction management or construction engineering to specific problems. Meets equivalent of one hour per week for each credit hour value. May be taken more than once for credit. One, two, or three credit hours. Offered on demand.

CNMG 3285 Civil Engineering Laboratory
Concurrent prerequisites: CNMG 3312 and 3374 or consent of instructor. Introduction to civil engineering software, for tasks such as computer-aided drafting, building information modeling, site planning, structural analysis, hydrologic analysis, hydraulic analysis, and highway design; lab or field testing of structural materials, components or systems, water, wastewater, etc. Students will learn to design and conduct experiments in accordance with testing standards, and to collect, analyze, and interpret data. One hour lecture, three hours lab. Two credit hours. Fall only.

CNMG 3302 Engineering Economy
Prerequisite: MATH 1311, 1342 or 1451, or consent of instructor. Introduction to engineering economic decisions for evaluating the worth of products, services, projects and systems; time value of money, economic equivalence concepts, comparison of investment alternatives, evaluating economic life and replacement analysis, inflation, depreciation and impact of taxes on engineering decisions, and economic risk analysis. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours. Cross listed as SYEN 3301. Spring only.

CNMG 3312 Engineering Structural Analysis
Prerequisites: MATH 2453 and CNMG 3376, or consent of instructor. Structural analysis of trusses, beams, frames, cables, and arches, including determinate and indeterminate structures; deflections of beams and frames; introduction to stiffness methods and matrix analysis of structures. Two hours lecture. Two hours lab. Three credit hours. Fall only.

CNMG 3321 Steel Construction
Prerequisite: CNMG 3333 or consent of instructor. Structural steel materials, shapes and uses; structural steel specifications and construction practices; structural steel fabrication and erection techniques, practices, and estimation; bolting, welding, and cutting of structural steel; construction techniques for stairs, bar joists and girders, tilt-ups, and steel deck; steel drawings, including set-up, design, detail, and erection drawings; estimating structural steel quantities and pricing. Two hours lecture. Two hours lab. Three credit hours. Fall only.

CNMG 3322 Concrete Construction
Prerequisite: CNMG 3333 or consent of instructor. Provides an in-depth examination of the principles and applications of concrete construction. Study of process of placing ready mix concrete from batching to curing along with the design, analysis, and economics of formwork. Reinforcing steel, the ACI field technician applications, and the ACI Flatwork Technician Certification are also covered. Two hours lecture, two hours lab. Three credit hours. Spring only.

CNMG 3327 Field Engineering and Construction Equipment
Prerequisite: CNMG 3333 or 3376, or consent of instructor. Principles of construction project field supervision and construction equipment. Leadership, motivation, communications, problem solving, decision making, production control, quality control, and computerized reporting. Earth moving fundamentals, equipment ownership and operating costs, and equipment selection and usage. Two hours lecture, two hours lab. Three credit hours. Spring only.

CNMG 3333 Statics/Strengths of Materials
Prerequisites: CNMG 2313, MATH 1303 or 1401, and PHYS 1321/1121, or consent of instructor. An analytical and practical approach to the principles and physical concepts of statics and strength of materials related to construction. Two hours lecture, two hours lab. Three credit hours. Spring only.

CNMG 3339 Estimating I
Prerequisites: MATH 1303 or 1401, and CNMG 2313 and 2314, or consent of the instructor. Theory and practice of construction project bidding and estimating. Topics include proposal solicitation and preparation, bidding strategy, estimate types and content, quantity survey, ethics, and an introduction to computer use in estimating. Two hours lecture, two hours lab. Three credit hours. Fall only.

CNMG 3347 Engineering Soil Mechanics with Lab
Prerequisites: CNMG 3333 or 3376, or consent of instructor. Introduction to soils and foundation engineering and construction soil mechanics technology. Students will study engineering properties of soils, soil field exploration procedures, soil test reports, soil compaction and stabilization construction methods, water movement in soils, moisture control and drainage procedures, in-situ stress distribution in shallow and deep soils, shear strength of clay, silt and sand soils and design of shallow building foundations. Students will perform ASTM soil testing to support the course content and generate laboratory technical reports for major laboratory tests performed during the course. Two hours lecture and two hours laboratory. Three credit hours. Spring only.

CNMG 3370 Statics and Dynamics
Prerequisites: PHYS 2321 or consent of instructor. Prerequisite concurrent: MATH 2453 or consent of instructor. Statics of particles, equivalent systems of forces, equilibrium of rigid bodies, centroids and centers of gravity, analysis of structures, friction, moments of inertia, kinematics and kinetics of particles, introduction to kinematics and kinetics of rigid bodies, forces and accelerations. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours. Cross listed as SYEN 3370. This course is no longer offered.

CNMG 3371 Engineering Dynamics
Prerequisite: CNMG 2370 or consent of instructor. Kinematics and kinetics of particles, systems of particles, and rigid bodies; energy and momentum methods; mechanical vibrations and resonance; introduction to structural dynamics due to time-varying loads, such as wind and seismic loading. Two hours lecture. Two hours lab. Three credit hours. Cross listed as SYEN 3371. Offered on demand.

CNMG 3372 Engineering Materials
Prerequisites: CHEM 1402 and MATH 1451, or consent of instructor. Atomic structure and bonding, crystal structures, crystal geometry, solidification, crystalline imperfections, diffusion in solids, mechanical properties of metals, polymeric materials, phase diagrams, engineering alloys, ceramics, composite materials, corrosion. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours. Cross listed as SYEN 3372. Fall only.

CNMG 3374 Hydraulic Engineering
Prerequisite: CHEM 1402 or 1406. Concurrent prerequisite: CNMG 3371, or consent of instructor. Properties of water; hydrostatics; water flow in pipes; pipelines and piping networks; water pumps; water flow in open channels. Two hours lecture, two hours lab. Three credit hours. Fall only.

CNMG 3376 Engineering Structural Mechanics
Prerequisites: CNMG 1213 and 2370, or consent of instructor. The study of deformation in structural materials: stresses and strains due to tension, compression, torsion, and bending; internal shear forces and bending moments; stress and strain transformations; design of beams and analysis of beam deflections; buckling of columns; introduction to the deformation of structures. Two hours lecture. Two hours lab. Three credit hours. Spring only.

CNMG 3378 Engineering Thermodynamics
Prerequisites: CHEM 1402, PHYS 2321, and MATH 1452, or consent of instructor. Properties of pure substances, thermodynamic processes, heat and work, the first law of thermodynamics, closed systems, enthalpy, open systems, the second law of thermodynamics, entropy, exergy, and an introduction to power and refrigeration cycles. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours. Cross listed as SYEN 3378. Fall only.

CNMG 3195 Community Service Projects
Prerequisites: Junior standing and consent of instructor. Students will complete at least 15 hours of community service with an approved nonprofit organization such as Children International. One credit hour. Offered on demand.

CNMG 4310 Construction Financial Management
Prerequisites: ACCT 2310 and CNMG 3339, or consent of the instructor. Concepts and principles of construction financial management: construction financial systems and transactions, financial statements, depreciation analysis. labor burden, overhead determination, bid profit margins, and profit center analysis. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours. Fall only.

CNMG 4311 Estimating II
Prerequisites: CNMG 3339 or consent of instructor. Advanced applications and concepts of construction project estimating. Topics include computer aided estimating, correcting estimating errors, labor and equipment productivity, risk adjustment to price, pricing by asset utilization, mark-up, and ethics. Students compete in mock bids on different types of construction projects. Two hours lecture, two hours lab. Three credit hours. Spring only.

CNMG 4313 Construction Management Fundamentals
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. This course provides an overview of construction management fundamentals such as delivery systems, estimating, scheduling and administration. It also covers construction practices such as safety, construction materials and methods, quality, and productivity. Topics include site work, concrete, masonry, steel, rough and finish carpentry, thermal and moisture protection, doors and windows, finishes, electrical and mechanical systems. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

CNMG 4218 Construction Modeling and Design
Prerequisites: CNMG 2218, 2314, and 3333 or 3370, or consent of instructor. Building information modeling (BIM) functions will be used for complex commercial construction; topographic information of sites, project datums, quantities and properties of building components, building sustainability analysis, documenting projects, and detailing of MEP or structural designs; Rendering of exterior and interior views. One hour lecture and three hours lab. Two credit hours. Fall only.

CNMG 4321 Reinforced Concrete Design
Prerequisite: CNMG 3312 or consent of instructor. Behavior and design of reinforced concrete elements, including beams, columns, slabs, footings, foundations, and retaining walls; introduction to prestressed concrete design. Two hours lecture. Two hours lab. Three credit hours. Spring only.

CNMG 4323 Construction Administration
Prerequisites: CNMG 1305 and junior standing, or consent of instructor. An introduction to construction project control and administration through computer applications. Topics include project team development, standard agreements, contract documents utilization, record keeping, submittals, subcontract management, purchasing, expediting, change orders, claims, progress payments, closeout, and internet-based project control. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours. Spring only.

CNMG 4322 Building Structure Design
Prerequisites: CNMG 3321 and 3322, or consent of instructor. Introduction to design and analysis of steel and concrete building structures. Student will study beams, columns, and tension components including fasteners and welds constructed from high strength structural steel following the AISC Manual, during the first half of the course. Reinforced concrete design and analysis procedures for rectangular beams and slabs for bending and shear loads and axially loaded round and square long columns will be studied during the second half of the course. The provisions of the ACI Code will be followed. Concrete prestressed beam technology will be included as well as steel rebar development. Two hours lecture and two hours problem lab. Three credit hours. Spring only.

CNMG 4329 Cost Planning & Scheduling
Prerequisite: CNMG 3339 or consent of instructor. An in-depth study of the process of creating and monitoring a construction project schedule. Creation of project schedules on a variety of scheduling software, with primary focus on Primavera. Two hours lecture, two hours lab. Three credit hours. Fall only.

CNMG 4334 Construction Contracts and Law
Prerequisites: senior standing and CNMG 4323, or consent of instructor. A study of construction contracts in relation to project delivery systems and the basic principles of construction law. Case studies are used to analyze selected areas that affect the construction process. Topics include standard agreements and conditions, negligence, risk, indemnities, modifications, mechanics lien, claims, dispute resolution, conflicts of interest, ethical consideration, and labor law. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours. Fall only.

CNMG 4342 Construction Safety
Prerequisites: junior standing or higher, or consent of instructor. A study of the principles of construction safety management and OSHA 29 CFR PART 1926. The OSHA Construction Industry Training Course 500 topics covered in depth. Students develop a company safety plan and hazardous communications program, perform safety analysis, conduct safety meetings, and write accident investigation reports. Students complete the topic requirements for the OSHA 10-hour and 30-hour Construction Safety and Health training card. Two hours lecture and two hours lab. Three credit hours. Spring only.

CNMG 4145 Professional Constructor Certification
Prerequisite: Senior standing or consent of instructor. Description of American Institute of Construction (AIC) certification programs and preparation for Constructor Qualifying Examinations leading to certifications as Associate Constructor (AC) and Certified Professional Constructor (CPC). Two hours lab. One credit hour. Spring only.

CNMG 4245 Construction Management Capstone
Prerequisites: Restricted to students in the final semester of the construction management or construction engineering program. A capstone course. Students develop and organize construction companies. Project contracts are awarded and contract administration is required. Two hours lecture. Two credit hours. Spring only.

CNMG 4351 Foundation Design
Prerequisite: CNMG 3347 or consent of instructor. A brief review of introductory soil mechanics followed by complete hands-on laboratory testing of sample soils for consolidation and tri-axial shear. The major portion of the course is composed of selected geotechnical aspects of foundation design, including both shallow and deep foundations. Topics include: ultimate bearing capacity, allowable bearing capacity, consolidation settlement of shallow foundations, pile foundations for bearing and friction piles, lateral earth pressure and retaining wall design, foundation design on difficult soils, and specialty soil improvement and ground modification. Two hours lecture. Two hours lab. Three credit hours. Spring only.

CNMG 4357 Water and Wastewater Engineering
Prerequisites: CNMG 3374, or consent of instructor. An introduction to drinking water treatment and distribution and wastewater collection and treatment. Topics include coagulation; flocculation; softening; ion exchange; membrane filtration; sedimentation; filtration; disinfection; wastewater microbiology; primary, secondary, and tertiary treatment of wastewater; and residuals management. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours. Spring only.

CNMG 4354 Highway Engineering
Prerequisites: STAT 3352, CNMG 23 16, and CNMG 334 7, or consent of instructor. An introduction to highway engineering and traffic analysis. Topics include geometric design of highways, pavement design, traffic flow, highway capacity, level-of-service analysis, traffic control devices and safety, travel demand and traffic forecasting. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours. Fall only.

CNMG 4361 Green Construction
Prerequisite: Junior standing or higher. Overview of design and construction delivery systems for high performance green buildings; relevant criteria and established guidelines; green standards; high performance green buildings and sustainability; vocabulary associated with sustainability and green buildings; physical limitations of materials. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours. Offered on demand.

CNMG 4371 Structural Steel Design
Prerequisite: CNMG 3312 or consent of instructor. Behavior and design of structural steel elements, including connectors, tension and compression members, columns, and braced and unbraced beams; members under combined forces; joints and connecting elements; connections. Two hours lecture. Two hours lab. Three credit hours. Spring only.

CNMG 4174 Fluid Mechanics Laboratory
Prerequisite concurrent: CNMG 4374. Analysis of experimental data, basic electrical measurements and sensing devices, pressure measurement, flow measurement, temperature measurement, data acquisition and processing, report writing and presentation, design of experiments. Two hours lab. One credit hour. Cross listed as SYEN 4174. Spring only.

CNMG 4176 Mechanics of Materials Laboratory
Prerequisite concurrent: CNMG 4376 or consent of instructor. Analysis of experimental data, basic electrical measurements and sensing devices, force measurement, torque measurement, strain measurement, motion measurement, vibration measurement, data acquisition and processing, report writing and presentation, design of experiments. Two hours lab. One credit hour. Cross listed as SYEN 4176. Spring only.

CNMG 4376 Mechanics of Materials
Prerequisites: CNMG 3370, and 1313 or 3372, or consent of instructor. Stress, strain, axial loading, torsion, pure bending, analysis and design of beams, shearing stresses in beams and thin-walled members, transformation of stress and strain, principal stresses, deflection of beams, columns, energy methods. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours. Cross listed as SYEN 4376. Spring only.

CNMG 4379 Heat Transfer
Prerequisites: CNMG 3374 or 4374, or consent of instructor. Prerequisite concurrent: MATH 3322, or consent of instructor. Steady and transient heat conduction; forced, natural, and multiphase convection; heat exchanger design and analysis; radiation heat transfer; mass transfer. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours. Cross listed as SYEN 4379. Fall only.

CNMG 4380 Heating, Ventilating, Air-Conditioning, and Refrigeration (HVACR) Engineering Fundamentals
Prerequisite: CNMG 2274 or SYEN/CNMG 3378, or consent of instructor. Fundamentals of heating, ventilating, air-conditioning, and refrigeration (HVACR) engineering; refrigeration cycles; psychrometrics; indoor air quality and ventilation; heating and cooling loads. Two hours lecture, two hours lab. Three credit hours. Cross-listed as SYEN 4380. Fall only.

CNMG 4381 Thermal Powerplant Engineering
Prerequisite: CNMG 2274 or SYEN/CNMG 3378, or consent of instructor. Thermodynamics of combustion and power cycles; internal combustion engines; steam turbine powerplants; gas turbine powerplants; combined cycle powerplants; introduction to alternative energy systems. Two hours lecture. Two hours lab. Three credit hours. Cross listed as SYEN 4381. Offered on demand.

CNMG 4185 Professional Engineering Seminar
Concurrent prerequisites: CNMG 3285, 4351, and 4371, registered to take the FE and AC exams, or consent of instructor. This course is a focused exploration of the Civil Engineering Body of Knowledge for the 21st Century, as developed by the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE). Students research the foundational, technical, and professional knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary for success in the engineering profession and present their results to peers, through oral and written presentations. Students also learn about the importance of engineering licensure and constructor certification, and begin preliminary work on the senior design project, which continues in CNMG 4285. Three hours lab. One credit hour. Fall only.

CNMG 4285 Civil and Construction Engineering Design Project
Prerequisite: Restricted to students in the final semester of the civil and construction engineering program. Prepare for engineering practice by designing a major civil/construction engineering project, based on knowledge and skills acquired in earlier course work and incorporating appropriate engineering standards and multiple realistic constraints (e.g., economic, ethical, and safety). One hour lecture, three hours lab. Two credit hours. Spring only.

CNMG 4389/5389 Professional Engineering Licensure
Prerequisite concurrent: Senior standing and registration for the Fundamentals of Engineering exam, or consent of instructor. Legal, regulatory, and ethical issues related to the practice of engineering; preparation for engineering licensure examinations. Two hours lecture. Three hours lab. Three credit hours. Cross listed as SYEN 4389/5389. Offered on demand.

CNMG 4391 Cooperative Education
Prerequisites: junior standing, declared major in construction management or construction engineering, and cumulative GPA of at least 2.50; approval of assignment by department chairperson. Requires at least 200 contact hours on the job. Three credit hours. Offered on demand.

CNMG 4395 Professional Development
Prerequisites: senior standing and consent of instructor. Partnerships between students and nonprofit community organizations will be established. Students use skills in construction management or construction engineering to assist with construction-related projects. Service hours will be established at the beginning of the course. Three credit hours. Offered on demand.

CNMG 4199, 4299, 4399 Special Topics in Construction
Prerequisites: consent of instructor based on relevance of subject matter to student career goals. Designed to meet special needs of students or industry to cover application of construction management or construction engineering to specific problems. Meets equivalent of one hour per week for each credit hour value. May be taken more than once for credit. One, two, or three credit hours. Offered on demand.

CNMG 4100, 4200, 4300 Independent Study
Prerequisite: junior standing. Topic and method of procedure must have approval of the supervising faculty member. Four to six hours per week of work on the project for each hour of credit earned. The exact hourly commitment per week and credit hour value depends on the nature of the project and is agreed on in advance by the student and the instructor. With approval, may be repeated for up to six hours of credit. One, two, or three credit hours. Offered on demand.

CPSC – Computer Science

CPSC 1105 First Year Experience for CPSC/IFSC Majors
A survey of the Computer and Information Science majors with coverage of Interpersonal and Team Communication skills, Time Management & Goal Setting, Techniques for Discovering, Organizing & Presenting Information, Self-Initiated Learning, and Overview of Campus-based resources. Activities include service learning projects, field trips, guest speakers, demonstrations, faculty presentations, and social networks. Two hour lab per week. One credit hours.

CPSC 1175 Introduction to Computer Science Laboratory
Prerequisite: MATH 1302 or equivalent. Corequisite: CPSC 1375. A laboratory course to accompany CPSC 1375. Introduction to editing, compiling, and executing programs on various platforms; UNIX operating system; number systems and number conversions; presentation software, and the internet resources. Successful completion of this course requires a grade of C or greater. Two hours laboratory per week. One credit hour.

CPSC 1310 Internet Technologies
See IFSC 1310. Internet Technologies.

CPSC 1370 Computer Literacy
The fundamental concepts of computing in a personal computer environment. Introduction to hardware and software and system configurations. The focus is on practical problem solving using popular PC application software for word processing, spreadsheets, and databases. This course may not be counted for credit toward a computer science major or minor. Three hours lecture per week. Three credit hours. (ACTS Course Number CPSI 1003)

CPSC 1372 RPG Programming
Prerequisite: CPSC 1375, MGMT 1310, or equivalent. Report Program Generator is a nonprocedural language for data processing. Input, output, arithmetic, comparison, control breaks, arrays, sequential files, direct-access files. This course may not be counted for credit toward a computer science major or minor. Three hours lecture per week. Three credit hours.

CPSC 1375 Programming I
Prerequisite: MATH 1302 or equivalent. Corequisite: CPSC 1175. Introduction to algorithm development and implementation using control structures, functions, arrays, pointers, and basic object-oriented concepts. Successful completion of this course requires a grade of C or greater. Three hours lecture per week. Three credit hours.

CPSC 2376 Programming II
Prerequisite: CPSC 1375. Advanced programming concepts including structures, abstract data types, details of object-oriented concepts including encapsulation and polymorphism in current object-oriented language. Successful completion of this course requires a grade of C or greater. Three hours lecture per week. Three credit hours.

CPSC 2377 Introduction to Game Programming
Prerequisites: CPSC 1375, IFSC 2300 SYEN 1302. Advanced programming concepts including structures, abstract data types, recursive techniques, game based hands-on experiences for students to learn and understand details of advanced object-oriented concepts in a current object-oriented language. Successful completion of this course requires a grade of C or greater. Three hours lecture per week. Three credit hours.

CPSC 2380 Data Structures and Algorithms
Prerequisite: CPSC 2376 or CPSC 2377. A systematic study of the main data structures of computer science: arrays, stacks, queues, linked lists, trees, graphs, hash tables. Implementation and analysis of the algorithms and programming techniques for searching sorting, inserting into, and deleting form these structures; efficiency considerations. Successful completion of this course requires a grade of C or greater. Three hours lecture per week. Three credit hours.

CPSC 2382 Introduction to Computer Systems and Assembly Language
Prerequisite: CPSC 1375 or equivalent. Introduction to machine architecture, detailed study of the PC instruction set and addressing modes. Assembling, linking, executing, and debugging of assembly language programs. Additional topics include keyboard and screen handling, string processing, interrupts, binary and decimal arithmetic. Three hours lecture per week. Three credit hours.

CPSC 2391 Cooperative Education
Prerequisites: major in computer science, CPSC 2376 or CPSC 2377, and consent of department chairperson. Designed to complement and extend the classroom learning experience through the application of theoretical concepts in a professional work environment. A minimum of 200 hours of work with a participating employer. The exact number of work hours, activities, and responsibilities are dependent on the nature of the work experience and must be specified in written agreements coordinated with the Office of Cooperative Education. Three credit hours.

CPSC 2399 Special Topics
Prerequisite: CPSC 1370, 1375, or equivalent or the consent of the instructor. Introduction to a programming language to be selected from the following list: Visual BASIC, C, ADA, Perl, XML, scripting languages, Internet programming. This course may be repeated with a different language. This course is not accepted for credit in the computer science major or minor. Three hours lecture per week. Three credit hours.

CPSC 3370 Net-centric Computing: Systems Concepts
Prerequisites: CPSC 2380 and CPSC 2382. Coverage of systems programming of net-centric computing systems. Hands-on experiences for students to learn how net-centric computing systems work and writing net-centric computing applications. Three hours lecture per week. Three credit hours.

CPSC 3371 Net-centric Computing: Language Concepts
Prerequisites: CPSC 2380 and CPSC 2382. Coverage of language design issues for net-centric computing systems. Hands-on experiences for students to learn and understand tradeoffs between applicative needs compared to language design and implementation issues. Three hours lecture per week. Three credit hours.

CPSC 3372 System Utilities
Prerequisite: CPSC 2376 or CPSC 2377. Job steps, file identification, program storage, data storage, cataloged procedures, libraries, utility programs. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

CPSC 3375 Database Concepts I
Prerequisites: CPSC 2380, MATH 2310. In-depth study of data models including E-R, EER, Relational, object relational, and other current models; Data language including relational algebra, relational calculus, SQL, and QBE; Database design including functional dependency and normalization; Database implementation using popular DBMSs; Application development using embedded SQL enhanced by web technology. Three hours lecture per week. Three credit hours.

CPSC 3380 Operating Systems
Prerequisites: CPSC 3370; MATH 1452 or equivalent. Buffering, physical input/output, and data management. Loaders, linkage editors, and relocation. Multiprogramming, scheduling resource allocation, and virtual memory. Three hours lecture per week. Three credit hours.

CPSC 3381 Enterprise COBOL Application Development
Prerequisites: CPSC 2376, CPSC 2377, or consent of the instructor. Accelerated programming in COBOL. Includes organization of COBOL programs, input, output, data manipulations, and tables, file organization, and file access methods. Subprogram, introduction to CICS programming. Three hours lecture per week. Three credit hours.

CPSC 3383 Language Structure
Prerequisites: CPSC 3371; MATH 2310. Concepts of syntax and semantics of grammars and languages. Study and comparison of the organization and major constructs of various programming language paradigms, with in-depth study of several specific languages. Implementation and compiler/interpreter-related issues. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

CPSC 3385 File Structures and Multimedia
Prerequisites: CPSC 2380 and MATH 1452 or equivalent. In-depth study of sequential, indexed, and direct file structure; buffering, indexing; file systems; markup file structures including XML. Modern file representation including image files and sound files; Multimedia technology including CD-ROM, DVDs, and tape storage. Three hours lecture per week. Three credit hours.

CPSC 3386 Information Storage and Retrieval
Prerequisites: CPSC 2380, MATH 2310, 1452 or equivalent. The analysis of information content by statistical, syntactic, and logical methods. Search and matching techniques. Automatic retrieval systems, question answering systems. Evaluation of retrieval effectiveness. Three hours lecture per week. Three credit hours.

CPSC 3387 Simulation Methods
Prerequisites: CPSC 2380, STAT 3352 or equivalent, MATH 1452. Introduction to the design and analysis of discrete probabilistic systems using simulation. Basic concepts in modeling and analysis for both continuous and discrete systems are covered. Combined simulation methods, including integrated qualitative/quantitative system modeling. Emphasizes model construction and simulation language. Three hours lecture per week. Three credit hours.

CPSC 3391 Cooperative Education
Prerequisites: major in computer science, completion of the computer science freshman and sophomore core, and consent of department chairperson. Further work experiences to complement and extend the classroom learning experience through the application of theoretical concepts in a professional work environment. A minimum of 200 hours work with a participating employer. The exact number of work hours, activities, and responsibilities are dependent on the nature of the work experience and must be specified in written agreements coordinated with the Office of Cooperative Education. Three credit hours.

CPSC 3482 Computer Organization I
Prerequisites: CPSC 2382 and MATH 2310 or equivalents. Computer history and technology. Computer subsystems and components. Instruction Set Architecture. Computer arithmetic, and codes. Hardwired versus microprogrammed control. Memory design. Bus systems and I/O devices. Computer performance. Architecture examples. Three hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week. Four credit hours.

CPSC 4360 Computer Security
Prerequisite: CPSC 3370 or consent of instructor. Junior standing or above. Increasing reliance on our computer-based infrastructure elements along with information-driven nature of today’s business require a solid and in depth understanding of security issues pertinent to the systems. The topics include threats, assumptions, assurance, confidentiality, integrity, availability, access control matrix and policies, security models, requirements imposed by policies, protection models, covert channels, formal methods for security, designing and evaluating systems, intrusion detection, auditing and other contemporary issues. Three hours lecture per week. Three credit hours.

CPSC 4366 Interactive Computer Graphics and Animation
Prerequisite: MATH 2310 and knowledge of C, C++, or Java programming. This course addresses topics such as introduction to computer graphics and all the details of design of modern graphics architectures. The topics covered include two and three dimensional modeling and transformation, lighting and shading, animation techniques, introduction to OpenGL. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as CPSC 5366. Three hours lecture per week. Three credit hours.

CPSC 4370 Theory of Computation
Prerequisites: CPSC 3371, MATH 2310. A study of the main areas of theoretical computer science and their hierarchical interconnections. Basic results relating to formal models of computation, with emphasis on grammars and languages, finite automata, Turning machines, and computational complexity. Three hours lecture per week. Three credit hours.

CPSC 4371 Computer Documentation
Prerequisite: Senior standing in computer science and consent of instructor. The design and development of computer system documentation with emphasis on user documentation. Practical experience in writing a user manual using structured design methodology. Discussion of online documentation, hypertext, and emerging documentation technologies. Three hours lecture per week. Three credit hours.

CPSC 4372 Object-oriented Programming
Prerequisites: working knowledge of a procedural programming language and UNIX operating system, or consent of the instructor. Concepts of object-oriented analysis, design, and implementation. Object-oriented programming in C++, Smalltalk, Java, and/or another current object-oriented programming language. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as CPSC 5372. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

CPSC 4373 Fundamentals of Software Engineering
Prerequisites: CPSC 3370, CPSC 3371, and MATH 1452. Requirements definition, analysis and modeling including use cases and use case paths, domain models, state transition diagrams; techniques to increase robustness and avoid disastrous defects; object-oriented architecture and design patterns and specifications in UML; performance impact of design choices; analysis of designs regarding maintainability and testability; security engineering; practical system test and glass-box testing fundamentals; verification of test coverage via decision tables and state transition table . Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as CPSC 5373. Three hours lecture per week. Three credit hours.

CPSC 4375 Fundamentals of Database Management Systems
Prerequisites: CPSC 3375 or equivalent. Advanced topics related to the design and efficient implementation of modern database management systems. Concurrency and transaction management, database security, query processing, query optimization, physical database storage, and indexing. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as CPSC 5375. Three hours lecture per week. Three credit hours.

CPSC 4376 Applied Cryptography
Prerequisites: CPSC 2380, MATH 2310, and STAT 3352 or equivalents. A survey and study of the major cryptographic techniques, algorithms, and implementations, with emphasis on applications to communications and network security. Intended as a practical introduction to the current state-of-the-art of cryptographic usage. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as CPSC 5376. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

CPSC 4381 Computer Architecture and Design
Prerequisite: CPSC 3482. Formal description of computer architecture and design, instruction set architectures, processor design of modern computers, pipeline and instruction level parallelism, memory system design, and input and output system design. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as CPSC 5381. Three hours lecture per week. Three credit hours.

CPSC 4382 Compiler Construction and Theory
Prerequisites: CPSC 3371. Fundamental principles of compiler design such as finite state machine and context-free grammar. Compilation techniques include compile and run-time symbol tables, lexical analysis, syntax analysis, semantic analysis, object code generation, error diagnostics, and optimization. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as CPSC 5382. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

CPSC 4383 Artificial Intelligence
Prerequisites: CPSC 3371; MATH 1452 and MATH 2310. Introduction to machine intelligence. Emphasis upon different paradigms for problem solving such as various state-space search strategies and other approaches. Exposure to one or more key areas such as robotics, logic programming, machine learning, expert systems, planning, neural networks, natural language processing, reasoning, under uncertainty, etc. Three hours lecture per week. Three credit hours.

CPSC 4384 Computer Networks
Prerequisites: CPSC 3370 and CPSC 3482. Introduction to design and analysis of computer networks. Computer communications architecture and protocols, local and wide area networks, IP networks, bridging and routing, Ethernet, wireless LANs, sockets programming, and distributed applications. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as CPSC 5384. Three credit hours.

CPSC 4387 Distributed Computing
Prerequisites: CPSC 3370. Network-based client/server computing. Topics include TCP/IP, object-oriented technology, distributed objects and their interfaces, JDBC, remote method invocation, CORBA, and web-based software system architecture. Three credit hours.

CPSC 4388 Smart Software Systems
Prerequisite: CPSC 3375, MATH 1452. Study of the concept, design, and implementation of rule-based systems, agent-based systems, reasoning, reasoning under uncertainty; belief systems, explanation systems; knowledge representation, knowledge acquisition, and knowledge discovery; and application of knowledge engineering in web technology. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as CPSC 5388. Three hours lecture per week. Three credit hours.

CPSC 4389 E-commerce: Analysis, Design, and Implementation
Prerequisites: CPSC 3371, 3375. E-commerce site analysis and design. Web-based system architecture, client/server computing, network protocols, software engineering for web based systems, computer networks, web-based databases, script languages (Java, VB), XML, ASP, SQL, and DSN. Three credit hours.

CPSC 4391 Cooperative Education
Prerequisites: major in computer science, CPSC 3391, and consent of department chairperson. Continuation of CPSC 3391. Work experiences to complement and extend the classroom learning experience through the application of theoretical concepts in a professional work environment. A minimum of 200 hours work with a participating employer. The exact number of work hours, activities, and responsibilities are dependent on the nature of the work experience and must be specified in written agreements coordinated with the Office of Cooperative Education. Three credit hours.

CPSC 4392 Capstone Project
Prerequisites: CPSC 3370, CPSC 3371, and CPSC 4373 or IFSC 3360. Capstone course in which student individually design a software system, document and present their conclusions. Students also develop a detailed undergraduate portfolio for a comprehensive review of their undergraduate work. Project work involves the development of design alternatives, development of an appropriate software architecture, and design and test the implemented system. The software design focuses on addressing overall design goals while understanding constraints of cost, etc. Deliverables and schedule are determined by the instructor. Three credit hours.

CPSC 4395, 4495, 4595 Internship
Prerequisites: senior standing in computer science, approval of assignment by advisor. Professional experience related to student’s discipline under supervision of advisor. Sixty hours work per credit hour. Three, four, or five credit hours.

CPSC 4399 Special Topics
Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Advanced topics in areas of current interest in computer science. Refer to the semester schedule for specific topics offered. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as CPSC 5399. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

CPSC 4100, 4200, 4300, 4400, 4500 Independent Study
Prerequisites: senior standing, at least 20 hours in computer science, consent of instructor. Designed for students who want to carry out special investigations. Topic and method of procedure must have approval of the supervising faculty member. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog at the 5000-level. Sixty hours work per credit hour. One, two, three, four, or five credit hours.

CRJU – Criminal Justice

CRJU 2300 Introduction to Criminal Justice
Basic understanding of legal and ethical foundations of criminal justice and the major components of the criminal justice system. Three credit hours. (ACTS Course Number CRJU 1023)

CRJU 3105, 3205, 3305 Seminar in Criminal Justice
Prerequisite: CRJU 2300. A study of special problems, issues, or trends relating to the criminal justice system. May be repeated with a change of subject and with permission of the department chairperson. One, two, or three credit hours.

CRJU 3301 Criminal Evidence
Prerequisite: CRJU 2300. An analysis of the legal problems associated with the investigation of crime; the acquisition, preservation, presentation of evidence; principles of proof in criminal proceedings. Three credit hours.

CRJU 3302 Legal Aspects of Law Enforcement
Prerequisite: CRJU 2300. A study of the leading constitutional cases in the area of criminal justice with particular emphasis on cases dealing with search and seizure, the privilege against self-incrimination, assistance of counsel, and fair trial guarantees. Three credit hours.

CRJU 3303 Survey of Corrections
Explores the operation of the correctional system within the context of society and within the criminal justice system, the integration of criminology, the courts and corrections, the relationship the correctional system has to society, its interaction with the other components within the criminal justice system, and its historical foundations. Three credit hours.

CRJU 3304 Police and Society
This course will examine the relationship between the police and the community from several different perspectives. We will start with an introduction to the history, practices and issues related to the law enforcement function in our society, followed by an overview of police functions and responsibilities at the local, state, and federal levels. Police operations will be examined relative to effectiveness in crime control, delivery of services, and maintenance of order. We will review contemporary policy issues, programs and strategies. Finally, we will examine existing programs, problems, and potential directions as well as successes and failures in policing. Primary emphasis will be placed on community policing and its impact on policing in the 21st century. Three credit hours.

CRJU 3306 Police Administration and Management
Basic understanding of the part police play within society and within the criminal justice system. Explores the relationship the police have to society, their interaction with the other components within the criminal justice system, and their historical foundations. Discusses management strategies that have been employed over the past century in policing emphasizing the daily administration of a police agency. Three credit hours.

CRJU 3307 Criminal Law
Prerequisite: CRJU 2300. An analysis of criminal acts, elements of specific crimes, and defenses permitted in the United States legal system. Three credit hours.

CRJU 3309 Cybercrime
Prerequisite: IFAS 2300 or consent of instructor. Designed to acquaint students with law enforcement’s response to crimes committed using computers, networks, and the internet. Three credit hours.

CRJU 3310 Race/Ethnicity and Criminal Justice
Prerequisite: CRJU 2300. An exploration of the differing experiences of racial/ethnic groups as they come into contact with crime and the criminal justice system. Three credit hours.

CRJU 3311 Gangs
Prerequisite: CRJU 2300. An examination of the historical, cross-cultural, and current state of gang involvement. Three credit hours.

CRJU 3312 Victimology
Prerequisite: CRJU 2300. A review of the distribution and causes of crime from the point of view of the victim, as well as detailing the interface between victims and the legal and social service communities. Three credit hours.

CRJU 3313 Crime and Science: An Introduction to Forensic Science
A general overview of the field of forensic science, the application of “science,” and the scientific method to the law. Topics such as criminalistics, including firearms and toolmarks, trace evidence, fingerprints, toxicology, and biological evidence, such as serology and DNA. Forensic pathology, forensic odontology, forensic anthropology, and forensic psychology will be introduced. An experience oriented component will be provided by currently active forensic specialists. Three credit hours.

CRJU 3314 Statistics in Criminal Justice
This course is an introduction to data analysis in criminology and criminal justice. The primary goal of the course is to introduce students to the statistics and the problems that are commonly encountered in crime research. Emphasis will be placed on the application of quantitative measures to the study of prevention, interdiction, and suppression of criminal behavior. Three credit hours.

CRJU 3315 Sex Crimes
This course will take an in-depth look at sex offenders and sex rimes. Students will explore possible causes of sex crimes, treatment options for sex offenders, victimization issues and types of sex offenders. Current research involving special topics as they re late to sex offenses will also be addressed in this course. Three credit hours.

CRJU 3337 Juvenile Delinquency
Juvenile delinquent behavior, problems, theory, cause, control and prevention. Cross listed with SOCI 3337. Three credit hours.

CRJU 3338 Criminological Theory
This course will provide the student with a comprehensive examination of criminological theory. The course surveys the major schools of thought related to crime causation and particular theories about crime and delinquency, places these theories in historical context, and reviews the primary assumptions of these theories and conclusions reached in criminological research. Three credit hours.

CRJU 3348 Internship I
Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Experience in law enforcement agencies, juvenile courts, probation and parole departments, other correctional institutions, delinquency control programs, and public or voluntary agencies. Three credit hours.

CRJU 3349 Internship II
A continuation of CRJU 3348. Three credit hours.

CRJU 3396 Psychology and the Criminal Process
An exploration of the contributions of psychology to the practice of law, law enforcement, and other related areas, illustrated in terms of testimony and court procedures, psychopathology, correctional services, the development of laws, and social psychology. Three credit hours.

CRJU 4199, 4299 Criminal Justice Workshop
Subjects vary. Sixteen hours of workshop time will equal one credit hour. One or two credit hours.

CRJU 4300 Crime and Behavior
Enables students to identify and understand the major schools of thought in criminology and to integrate them into a comprehensive application to the real world. Three credit hours.

CRJU 4301 Judicial System and Process
Prerequisites: CRJU 2300. A survey of state, local, and federal judicial systems and their interrelationships. Examines judicial structures, functions, and decision-making procedures. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as CRJU 5301. Three credit hours.

CRJU 4302 Law and Society
Prerequisites: CRJU 2300. An examination of the origins and history of law in society, including the evolving roles of judges, juries, defense attorneys, and prosecutors. Examines the evolution of civil and criminal law, the adversary system, and the concept of justice. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as CRJU 5302. Three credit hours.

CRJU 4303 Readings in Criminal Justice
Prerequisite: CRJU 2300. A survey of the current literature on crime and law enforcement, with emphasis on special research reports and periodical and journal articles in criminal justice, law sociology, and related fields. Three credit hours.

CRJU 4304 Research Methods
Instruction in reading and comprehension of reports and research within the criminal justice field, identifying the application of various research techniques and statistical methods, and producing a draft research proposal. Three credit hours.

CRJU 4305 Juvenile Law and Process
Prerequisite: CRJU 2300. An exploration of the philosophical basis, process, legal rights of juveniles, and roles of the major participants in the juvenile justice system. Three credit hours.

CRJU 4307 Drug Abuse
A study of frequently abused drugs, with emphasis on the personal, social, and legal consequences of drug abuse and on the treatment of drug addiction. Three credit hours.

CRJU 4309 Crime Prevention
This course provides an overview of the fundamental concept of crime prevention, beginning with a review of crime statistics and crime causation theories and their relevance in the prevention of crime. The course will review current crime prevention strategies as they relate to crime prevention efforts and explore physical environments that positively influence human behavior. Three credit hours.

CRJU 4310 Terrorism
This course provides an overview of terrorism as a political weapon, definitions of terrorism, an examination of the causes of terrorism, precepts of domestic and international terrorism, and the religious foundations of terrorism. The course will review current active terrorist groups, their organizational structures, philosophies and networks. Three credit hours.

CRJU 4311 Security Management
This course is an examination of the principles and issues of organizational security management. The course will examine the historical development of public and private security and its form and practice in modern society. Students will examine the fundamental challenges embodied in various aspects of security such as personnel, facility, and information security. Three credit hours.

CRJU 4312 Homeland Security
This course provides an introduction to the theory and practice of homeland security in both the public and private sector at the national, regional, state, and local level. Students will explore the practical, legal, policy, and theoretical aspects of counterterrorism and counterintelligence as they relate to defending the US against foreign and domestic attacks.

CRJU 4313 Information Security
This course is an examination of the administrative aspects of information security management and is designed to develop knowledge and skills for protection of information and information systems within organizations. Students will be exposed to a wide spectrum of security activities, methods, methodologies, and procedures. Three credit hours.

CRJU 4120, 4220, 4320 Independent Study
Prerequisites: 15 hours of CRJU courses, senior standing with 3.00 GPA, consent of instructor. Advanced study and research. One, two, or three credit hours.

CRJU 4332 Corrections Psychology
Prerequisite: CRJU 2300. A review of theoretical and applied issues in the practice of correctional psychology. Focus on relevant empirical studies and their application in a correctional context. Three credit hours.

CRJU 4333 Cooperative Education
Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Experience in law enforcement agencies, juvenile courts, probation and parole departments, other correctional institutions, delinquency control programs, and public or voluntary agencies. Three credit hours.

CRJU 4351 Constitutional Law II
Civil liberties, analysis of leading constitutional decisions focusing on human freedom and fundamental rights. Emphasis on religious liberty, freedom of expression, racial equality, privacy, criminal procedures and the dynamics of Supreme Court decision making. Cross listed with POLS 4351. Three credit hours.

CRJU 4380 Comparative Criminal Justice Systems
Prerequisite: CRJU 2300. An analysis of the law enforcement, judicial, and correctional systems of other nations, with emphasis on comparison with the United States system of criminal justice. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as CRJU 5380. Three credit hours.

DANC – Dance

DANC 2201 Modern Dance I
A course in the basic movement techniques of contemporary dance, with emphasis on breath, alignment, coordination, and endurance. This course is repeatable for credit. Two credit hours.

DANC 2241 Ballet I
The study of basic classical ballet technique and terminology. This study will place emphasis on barre and center work to gain alignment, strength, flexibility and coordination. This course is repeatable for credit. Two credit hours.

DANC 2261 Jazz Dance I
Basic style, technique, and rhythmic structures of jazz dance. This course is repeatable for credit. Two credit hours.

DANC 2271 Dance Improvisation
Guided exploration in the process of spontaneous movement discovery through solo and group movement experiences, leading to an expanded awareness of the individual’s infinite movement resources for performance and choreography. Repeatable for credit. Two credit hours.

DANC 2281 Tap Dance I
Basic tap dance techniques, including basic listening, rhythmic and coordination skills. This course is repeatable for credit. Two credit hours.

DANC 3240 Music for Dance
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Development of musical skills for dance. Study of musical elements related to dance; dance accompaniment techniques; music discovery and selection; recording/mixing techniques; and hands-on experience with percussion and other instruments. Two credit hours.

DANC 3261 Jazz Dance II
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Development of technical skills in jazz dance, including increased complexity of movement capabilities, with an emphasis on stylistic flexibility and performance qualities. This course is repeatable for credit. Two credit hours.

DANC 3270 Body Conditioning
A course in body conditioning, designed to give the dancer additional physical training that will complement regular dance technique courses. Specific method of body conditioning may vary by semester, and could include PilatesÂź, Yoga, GyrotonicÂź, or other methods of body conditioning. Repeatable for credit. Two credit hours.

DANC 3281 Tap Dance II
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Development of technical and performance skills in tap dance, including more advanced listening, rhythmic and coordination skills. Additional emphasis on audition strategies. Repeatable for credit. Two credit hours.

DANC 3301 Modern Dance II
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Development of technical skills in contemporary dance, including rhythmic perception and spatial awareness, with increased emphasis on musicality and performance qualities. Repeatable for credit. Three credit hours.

DANC 3311 Dance History I
Study of the history of dance from primitive culture through the early 1900s. The primary focus is the development of dance as an art form in Western cultures, with specific emphasis on the origins and evolution of ballet. Three credit hours.

DANC 3312 Dance History II
Study of the history of dance in the 20th and 21st Centuries. The primary focus is the development of dance as an art form in Western cultures, with specific emphasis on contemporary dance and the evolution and emergence of new dance forms. Three credit hours.

DANC 3320 Labanotation
System for recording movement. An aid in clarifying understanding of movement both as performer and as choreographer. Three credit hours.

DANC 3341 Ballet II
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Intermediate ballet technique course. Development of technical skills in ballet, including safe and efficient alignment and expanded movement vocabulary, with increased emphasis on musicality and performance qualities. Repeatable for credit. Three credit hours.

DANC 3360 Dance Pedagogy
Prerequisite: permission of instructor. An overview of the general theories and practices of teaching dance; study of various methodologies used to teach dance techniques and creative movement. Opportunities to develop and implement lesson plans for students in workshop settings. Development of comprehensive syllabi for dance in private studios and public schools. Three credit hours.

DANC 3371 Choreography I
Prerequisite: DANC 2271 and permission of instructor. Co-requisite: must be enrolled in one of the following courses: DANC 2201, DANC 3301, DANC 4301, DANC 2241, DANC 3341, or DANC 4341. Introduction to the basic elements of dance composition. Introduction to various methods of creating and manipulating original movement. Emphasis will be on short solo and group studies that explore space, time, energy, rhythm, shape, and dynamics. Three credit hours.

DANC 4100, 4200, 4300 Independent Study
Prerequisite: consent of dance faculty. An opportunity for advanced students to conduct an in-depth study in a specific area of interest or a special problem. One, two or three credit hours.

DANC 4140, 4240, 4340 Special Topics in Dance
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Special topics for the study of an area not offered in the regular dance curriculum. The content and course subtitle change each time offered. Refer to the semester class schedule for a descriptive title of the content. Repeatable for credit. One two, or three credit hours. Dual listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog at the 5000-level.

DANC 4191, Dance Performance
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Study of selection of works, areas of appropriate staging, musical selections, technical aspects, audition, rehearsal, and all aspects of performance of dance. Repeatable for credit. One credit hour.

DANC 4261 Jazz Dance III
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Further development of skill, style, and understanding of the jazz form of dance. Repeatable for credit. Two credit hours.

DANC 4301 Modern Dance III
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Further development of kinesthetic, expressive, and aesthetic principles in contemporary dance at an advanced level. Increased complexity of movement capabilities, rhythmic structure, and spatial designs. Exploration of body/mind connection. Additional emphasis on aesthetic and expressive qualities for performance. Repeatable for credit. Three credit hours.

DANC 4302 Modern Dance IV
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Refinement of contemporary dance technique and performance skills at the advanced/pre-professional level. Repeatable for credit. Three credit hours.

DANC 4330 Dance Science and Kinesiology
Prerequisites: ANTH 1415 or BIOL 1401. Permission of instructor required. Study of the science of human movement as it applies to dance technique and performance. Students will gain a working knowledge of skeletal and muscular anatomy, and the ability to analyze movement for increased efficiency and effectiveness in training and performance. This course also includes an introduction to somatics and conditioning principles; and an overview of basic diet, health care, and injury prevention for dancers. Three credit hours.

DANC 4341 Ballet III
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Further development of kinesthetic, expressive, and aesthetic principles of ballet at an advanced level. Exploration of body/mind connection. Additional emphasis on self-expression within the ballet aesthetic. Repeatable for credit. Three credit hours.

DANC 4342 Ballet IV
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Refinement of ballet technique and performance skills at an advanced/pre-professional level. Repeatable for credit. Three credit hours.

DANC 4354 Dance Criticism and Concepts
This course examines dance forms, personalities, trends, and criteria for critical and appreciative viewing of the dance. Three credit hours.

DANC 4371 Choreography II
Prerequisite: DANC 3371. Co-requisite: must be enrolled in one of the following courses: DANC 2201, DANC 3301, DANC 4301, DANC 4302, DANC 2241, DANC 3341, DANC 4341 or DANC 4342. Further exploration of methods to create and manipulate movement material. Solo and group studies of increased complexity, exploring spatial design, group forms, musical structures, and texture, with attention to overall compositional structure. Three credit hours.

DANC 4372 Choreography III
Prerequisite: DANC 4371. Co-requisite: must be enrolled in one of the following courses: DANC 2201, DANC 3301, DANC 4301, DANC 4302, DANC 2241, DANC 3341, DANC 4341 or DANC 4342. Advanced course in dance composition, encompassing various methods of colliding, juxtaposing, and interweaving a wide range of original material to create cohesive, powerful works with solid compositional structure. Creation of complete works, culminating in a student-choreographed concert. Three credit hours.

DANC 4399 Senior Dance Project
Prerequisite: Senior standing and permission of dance faculty. Public presentation of choreography and performance, accompanied by written documentation of the project and a complete digital portfolio. The project is designed to demonstrate the student’s mastery of the skills developed during their course of study in Dance at UALR. Specific requirements and expectations for the project will be determined by the dance faculty, based on the nature of the proposed project. Required of all B.F.A. dance majors. Three credit hours.

ECED – Early Childhood Education

ECED 2200 Field Experience I
This field experience will acquaint candidates with a variety of preschool or kindergarten experiences. Candidates will be oriented to the structure of school district, the school, and the classroom setting. Students are placed with a cooperating teacher in a pre-K or Kindergarten classrooms for the full day each Friday for 13 weeks. Candidates are required required to submit a “field reflection” each week to their University Supervisor, and organize a “field notebook” with the required items. Two credit hours.

ECED 2300 Introduction to Early Childhood Education
Prerequisites: admission to early childhood education program. Students are introduced to the early childhood education profession. The history and current issues in early childhood education are explored. Infant, toddler, preschool, kindergarten, and primary education are explored from a developmentally appropriate practice perspective. The concepts of inclusion, interaction of family, community, school, and multiculturalism are explored in the context of legal and ethical considerations. Three credit hours.

ECED 2301 Language and Literature and Literacy I
Prerequisites: admission to early childhood education program and concurrent enrollment in ECED 2200. Students will become acquainted with the value of literature shared in active learning environments, especially designed for young children. The course includes an extensive view of literature written for children from birth through age eight with an examination of developmentally appropriate ways to interact with children about books and stories. Students will develop activities and implement them in a field placement. Three credit hours.

ECED 2302 Child Growth
Prerequisites: admission to early childhood education program and concurrent enrollment in ECED 2200. Study of environmental and hereditary influences on cognitive, affective, and psycho-motor development of typically and atypically developing children from birth to adolescence. Students consider both predictable developmental patterns and unique patterns due to sexual, socioeconomic, cultural, and normal variations in inherited characteristics. Students observe, record, and analyze behavior and development of children in an educational setting. Concurrent enrollment in ECED 2200 is required. Four credit hours.

ECED 3200 Field Experience II
Candidates spend one full day a week in a classroom with young children in grades 1 or 2 for 14 weeks. They are expected to complete assignments from ECED 3301 Literacy II, MATH 3380 Math I, ECED 3300 Guidance, and ECED 3304 Science Methods. Two credit hours.

ECED 3201 Field Experience III
Candidates spend one full day a week in a classroom with young children in grades 3 or 4 for 14 weeks. They are expected to complete assignments from ECED 3302 Literacy III, ECED 4399 Assessment, ARED Public School Art, MATH 3382 Math II, and SPED 4301 Education of Exceptional Learners. Candidates are required to submit a “field reflection” each week to their University Supervisor. Two credit hours.

ECED 3300 Guiding Young Children
Prerequisites: admission to early childhood education program and 2302 Child Growth. Students will learn theoretical bases and developmentally appropriate practices in guiding young children toward socialization and self-discipline. They will also learn how to design and maintain effective learning environments in a multicultural setting. Students will apply guidance strategies in field placement and design a developmentally appropriate guidance and classroom management plan. Three credit hours.

ECED 3301 Language, Literature, and Literacy II
Prerequisites: admission to early childhood education program and ECED 2301 Language and Literature and Literacy I. Literacy I focuses on the foundations of emergent and early literacy in a natural learning environment for preschool through early primary. Emphasis will be given to learning to teach through the components of a balanced literacy program with special attention placed on designing and managing literate environments, appropriate book selection, language development activities, and using observational assessment strategies to guide instruction. Three credit hours.

ECED 3302 Language, Literature, and Literacy III
Prerequisites: admission to early childhood education program and ECED 3301 Language and Literature and Literacy II. This course parallels Literacy II, but addresses the needs of children at a higher literacy level. Literacy III focuses on the foundations of early and fluent stages of literacy in a natural learning environment for second grade through fourth grade children. Emphasis will be given to learning to teach through the components of a comprehensive literacy program with special attention placed on designing and managing literate environments, appropriate book selection, word building activities to promote visual processing strategies, comprehension development, and using observational assessment strategies to guide instruction. Three credit hours.

ECED 3304 Integrated Science
Prerequisites: admission to early childhood education program and concurrent enrollment in ECED 2200. Students will be acquainted with the standards for science in early childhood developed by the State of Arkansas and by the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Developmentally appropriate content and teaching strategies for preschool and primary grade science and their underlying theoretical bases will be presented. Students will be expected to develop activities and units and to implement them in a field placement. Three credit hours.

ECED 4301 Internship Seminar I
This seminar is designed to teach advanced strategies in guidance, teaching, planning and professionalism. The course will review material previously covered in the program of study and explore it at a more complex level. Particular attention is focused on the teacher as decision-maker and the link between assessment and pedagogical decision-making. All aspects of the class will ask students to connect the course content to their daily experiences in their internship classroom. A major assignment in the course will be to write detailed lesson plans for the week in their internship when they will be responsible for all classroom planning and teaching. Three credit hours.

ECED 4306 Early Childhood Social Studies
This course provides the opportunity for students to analyze and develop integrated curricula in social studies from a variety of historical and current perspectives, within the context of professional, state and local standards. Students integrate knowledge from the six disciplines of social studies (history, anthropology, sociology, political science, geography, and economics) into the design of a constructivist, inquiry-based social studies curriculum. The course explores ways children come to learn about themselves and others. There is an emphasis on meeting the needs of all children, including attention to diverse linguistic and cultural backgrounds, and different learning abilities and styles. Three credit hours.

ECED 4399 Early Childhood Assessment
A study of fundamental observation, assessment, and evaluation concepts and tools. Emphasis placed on both qualitative and quantitative methods of reporting student progress. Principles of classroom test construction, alternative assessment techniques, and measurement strategies at various developmental levels will be addressed. Students will learn to accurately interpret standardized test results and be exposed to ethical and legal considerations surrounding use and reporting of assessment results. Three credit hours.

ECED 4307 Internship Seminar II
Prerequisites: completion of the Teaching the Curriculum semester and simultaneous enrollment in ECED 4901: Internship II. The Professional Seminar follows the student’s completed field experience. Topics include analysis of field experiences; review of legal issues affecting educational practice; preparing for job interviews; preparation for the first teaching year; maintaining a professional portfolio to demonstrate growth; reflecting on personal development; and meeting the Arkansas Teacher Licensure Standards. Concurrent enrollment in ECED 4602 Internship II is required. Five credit hours.

ECED 4399 Early Childhood Assessment
A study of fundamental observation, assessment, and evaluation concepts and tools. Emphasis placed on both qualitative and quantitative methods of reporting student progress. Principles of classroom test construction, alternative assessment techniques, and measurement strategies at various developmental levels will be addressed. Students will learn to accurately interpret standardized test results and be exposed to ethical and legal considerations surrounding use and reporting of assessment results. Three credit hours.

ECED 4600 Internship I
Concurrent enrollment in ECED 4301 Internship Seminar I is required. The internship semester is designed for candidates to observe, participate and gradually assume complete responsibility for the classroom. They will plan, teach, and reflect on their classroom experience. Candidates will plan and implement modifications for children, including accommodation for ability level, exceptionalities, language and cultural differences. Inclusion of technology in their lessons is expected. Six credit hours.

ECED 4901 Internship II
Concurrent enrollment in ECED 4307 Internship Seminar II. The internship semester is designed for candidates to observe, participate and gradually assume complete responsibility for the classroom. They will plan, teach, and reflect on their classroom experience. Candidates will plan and implement modifications for children, including accommodation for ability level, exceptionalities, and language and cultural differences. Inclusion of technology in their lessons is expected. Development is required. Six credit hours.

ECET – Electronics & Computer Engineering Technology

ECET 1302 Introductory Experience in Technology and Computers
A project-based experiential learning course to modern technology through hands-on laboratory activities, team work, and cooperative learning, and problem solving. Introduction to design process and reverse engineering. Five hours of integrated lecture lab. Three credit hours.

ECET 1404 Circuit Analysis I
Prerequisites: a grade of C or greater in ECET 1302 or consent of instructor, and MATH 1302. A study of DC (direct current) circuit analysis techniques using resistors, inductors, and capacitors as circuit elements. Network theorems and introduction to AC analysis. Three hours lecture and three hours lab. Four credit hours.

ECET 2100 Methods of Engineering Computation
Corequisite: MATH 1303. Use of microcomputers for technical data analysis, manipulation, and reports. Application of the computer to engineering problem solving. One hour lecture and one hour lab. One credit hour.

ECET 2105 Circuits and Simulation Laboratory
Corequisite: ECET 2305. Laboratory experiments to supplement classroom instruction in ECET 2305. Introduction to electronics simulation software and its applications to laboratory exercises. Three hours lab. One credit hour.

ECET 2150 Microprocessor Fundamentals
Prerequisites: a grade of C or greater in ECET 1404, sophomore standing. Study includes number systems, basic types of instructions and addressing modes, and an overview of the functional organization inside a microprocessor. One hour lecture. One credit hour.

ECET 2152 Introductory Digital Laboratory
Corequisite: ECET 2352. Lab exercises to provide practical knowledge of logic devices and their applications. One three-hour lab. One credit hour.

ECET 2169 Sophomore Design Project
Prerequisite: sophomore standing. Schematic layout through CAD; PCB design to include SMT components; complete fabrication with mechanical consideration, and casing. Both written report and oral presentation are required. Three hours lab. One credit hour.

ECET 2191 Cooperative Education
Prerequisites: sophomore standing in engineering technology and approval of department’s chairperson; cumulative GPA of 2.50; minimum GPA of 2.30 for previous semester. Industrial experience under supervision of faculty advisor to supplement course work. Students who take this course may not take 2291. Requires at least 240 contact hours on the job. One credit hour.

ECET 2291 Cooperative Education
Prerequisites: sophomore standing and approval of department’s chairperson; cumulative GPA of 2.50; minimum GPA of 2.30 for previous semester. Industrial experience under supervision of advisor to supplement course work. Students who take this course may not take 2191. Requires at least 480 contact hours on the job. Two credit hours.

ECET 2300 Numerical Methods for Technologists
Prerequisite: IFSC 1202 or equivalent. Corequisite: MATH 1311. An introductory course in symbolic language programming with application to engineering problems. Related material in numerical methods of solution is presented. Five hours of combined lecture and laboratory. Three credit hours.

ECET 2305 Circuit Analysis II
Prerequisites: grades of C or greater in ECET 1404, MATH 1303. A study of the steady-state response of AC electrical circuits. The applications of the concepts of inductive reactance, capacitive reactance, and complex impedance to the solutions of AC circuits, series and parallel resonance, and power. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

ECET 2330 Electronics and Controls
Prerequisite: a grade of C or greater in ECET 2405. Intended for majors other than electronics and computer engineering technology. Fundamental elements of power electronics needed to understand the operation and maintenance of electronic equipment. Introduction of power semiconductor devices including diodes and thyristors. The electronic control of motors, including variable frequency drives. Controlling the operation of equipment and processes with programmable logic controllers. Two hours lecture, three hours laboratory. Three credit hours.

ECET 2352 Introduction to Digital Systems
Prerequisite: a grade of C or greater in ECET 1404 or equivalent. Introduction to digital circuits and systems. Number systems, Boolean algebra, and applications of basic logic gates; exercises in analysis and design of combinational and sequential logic circuits, including encoders, decoders, multiplexers, flip-flops, registers, and counters. Microprocessor architecture software and programming. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

ECET 2405 Electrical Technology
Prerequisite: a grade of C or greater in MATH 1303. Corequisite: PHYS 1322 and 1122. An introductory course in electrical technology for majors other than electronics and computer engineering technology. A review of basic quantities including current, voltage, power, and energy. An introduction to machines and transformers, including direct current motors, induction motors, stepper motors, synchronous generators, and transformers. Three hours lecture, three hours lab. Four credit hours.

ECET 3191 Cooperative Education
Prerequisites: junior standing in engineering technology and approval of department’s chairperson; cumulative GPA of 2.50, minimum GPA of 2.30 for previous semester. Industrial experience under supervision of advisor to supplement course work. Students who take this course may not take 3291. Requires at least 240 contact hours on the job. One credit hour.

ECET 3291 Cooperative Education
Prerequisites: junior standing in engineering technology and approval of chairperson; cumulative GPA of 2.50; minimum GPA of 2.30 for previous semester. Work experience related to student objectives under supervision of advisor. Students who take this course may not take 3191. Requires at least
480 contact hours on the job. Two credit hours.

ECET 3300 Independent Study
Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Study of assigned topics chosen to develop investigative, analytical, research, or professional skills related to engineering. The student is expected to spend 8 to 10 hours per week on the project. The exact hourly commitment depends on the complexity of the project and is agreed on in advance by the student and the instructor. Three credit hours.

ECET 3308 Robotics and Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs)
Prerequisite: grade of C or greater in ECET 1404 or 2405. A study of operation of PLC’s, including ladder logic programming and interfacing to industrial-type equipment, such as motors. Programming topics include bit addressing, timers, counters, and switches. The application of PLC’s for robotic control will be examined. Two hours lecture, three hours lab. Three credit hours.

ECET 3316 Power Systems and Equipment
Prerequisites: grades of C or greater in ECET 2303, MATH 1311. Basic principles of AC power systems analysis, with emphasis on three-phase systems. Load and fault analysis and economic operation. Major equipment items, including motors, generators, transformers, and switching and control equipment. Two hours lecture, two hours lab and recitation. Three credit hours.

ECET 3350 Microprocessor Systems
Prerequisite: a grade of C or greater in CPSC 2382 or ECET 2150. Survey of addressing modes and instructions. Some hardware is introduced and electronic signals are related to software statements. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

ECET 3360 Data Acquisition and Sensors
Prerequisite: grades of C or greater in ECET 2300, 2352, and 3406; or consent of instructor. A practice-oriented course emphasizes the use of sensors in instrumentation and control and provides an understanding of the techniques of acquisition and manipulation of experimental and sensory data using computer hardware and software to build a coordinated and optimal automated system. Principles of process control using personal computers to provide an inexpensive solution for isolated or small-scale industrial process control are also discussed. Two hours lecture, three hours lab. Three credit hours.

ECET 3405 Electronic Devices I
Requisites: grades of C or greater in ECET 2305 and 2105. A study of the characteristics and applications of electronic elements including diodes, BJTs, and op-amps. Includes load lines, biasing techniques, single and multistage signal amplifiers, power amplifiers, and transistor switching characteristics. Laboratory exercise also includes computer simulation. Three hours lecture, three hours lab. Four credit hours.

ECET 3406 Electronic Devices II
Prerequisite: a grade of C or greater in ECET 3405. A detailed study of the operational amplifier, including gain considerations and frequency response. Selected applications of the op-amp to instrumentation, control, and active filters; computer-aided analysis is fully integrated into all topics. Other topics include oscillators and timing circuits. Three hours lecture, three hours lab. Four credit hours.

ECET 3409 Applied Transform Methods
Prerequisites: grades of C or greater in ECET 3406 and MATH 1312. Laplace transform method applied to network analysis, filters, and feedback systems. Fourier series and Fourier transform techniques with application to communication signals. Introduction to Z transform for digital signal processing. The laboratory projects include computer simulation using Matlab. Three hours lecture, three hours lab. Four credit hours.

ECET 4199 Special Technical Topics I
Prerequisite: consent of instructor based on relevance of subject matter to student career goals. Designed to meet special needs of students or industry to cover application of technology to specific industrial problems. Meets equivalent of one hour. One credit hour.

ECET 4304 Industrial Controls
Prerequisites: a grade of C or greater in ECET 4407. A detailed study of industrial controls based around microcontrollers. Practical applications are emphasized. Topics include interface devices, such as opto-isolators and solid state relays. Two hours lecture, three hours lab. Three credit hours.

ECET 4306 Data and Computer Communications
Prerequisite: a grade of C or greater in ECET 3409. Discusses principles and practices in data communications with emphasis on the hardware aspects of data communication. Topics include transmission, encoding, decoding, data interfacing, error detection and correction, link control, networking and protocols. Internetworking over the internet. Three hours of lecture. Three credit hours.

ECET 4309 Applied Signal Processing
Prerequisite: grade of C or greater in ECET 3409. A hands-on experience to digital signal processing through laboratory exercises in a computer environment. Sampling theorem, discrete-time signals and systems, DFT, FFT, and digital filters. Two hours of lecture and two hours lab. Three credit hours.

ECET 4351 System Design
Prerequisites: grades of C or greater in ECET 3409 and 4450, or consent of instructor. Methods of approaching design problems, software control of hardware, modeling of applications, hardware/software trade-offs in the design process. Students work in teams to solve a substantive design problem. The course integrates at the system level the hardware/software knowledge of the electronics and computer engineering technology major. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

ECET 4353 Optical Electronic Devices and Systems
Prerequisites: grades of C or greater in ECET 3406 and 4407. Applications of optoelectronic devices to communications, robotics, and automated manufacturing. Two hours lecture, two hours lab. Three credit hours.

ECET 4354 Computer Hardware Architecture
Prerequisites: grades of C or greater in ECET 3350, 4407. Study of the various hardware designs and their relationship to architecture. Includes an overview of mainframe, supercomputers, and multicomputers. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

ECET 4362 Real-Time Systems
Prerequisites: grades of C or greater in ECET 3350 and CPSC 2376 or equivalents. Real-time specification and design techniques, real-time kernals, intertask communication and synchronization, real-time memory management, system performance analysis and optimization. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

ECET 4363 Network Technology and Management
Prerequisite: grade of C or greater in ECET 4306. A continuation of the studies of the principles and practices in data communication and includes topics such as switches and switching fabric, frame relay, ATM, and emerging technologies. Protocols and techniques for monitoring and managing computer networks, and computer security issues are discussed. Two hours lecture and two hours lab. Three credit hours.

ECET 4370 Senior Design Project
Prerequisite: grade of C or greater in ECET 4351. Students work independently with a faculty mentor on a design/research problem. The project could be developed through industry collaboration, faculty research, or at the student’s own initiative through literature search. The project requires electronics and computer engineering technology faculty approval, formal oral and written presentation, and demonstration of the project. Students meet with the mentor weekly to discuss their designs. Five hours lab. Three credit hours.

ECET 4399 Special Technical Topics III
Prerequisite: consent of instructor based on relevance of subject to student career goals. Designed to meet special needs of students or industry to cover application of technology to specific industrial problems. Meets equivalent of three hours. Three credit hours.

ECET 4407 Digital System Design
Prerequisites: grades of C or greater in ECET 2300, 2352, 2152, and 3405. Advanced concepts in digital system design to include programmable devices, and state machines using HDL. Laboratory projects include computer simulation. Three hours lecture, three hours lab. Four credit hours.

ECET 4450 Embedded Systems
Prerequisites: grades of C or greater in ECET 3350 and 4407. Techniques for interfacing micros to outside devices. Detailed analysis of bus standards, serial and parallel input/output to peripherals. Laboratory includes the application of interfacing techniques to build a microcomputer and interface it to outside devices. Three hours lecture, three hours lab. Four credit hours.

ECET 4479 Communication Systems
Prerequisites: grades of C or greater in ECET 3406 and 3409. Spectral analysis of signals; noise; linear modulation and demodulation; AM, SSB, angle modulation and demodulation; phase locked hoops, and digital communication techniques. Three hours lecture, three hours lab. Four credit hours.

ECET 4480 Digital Communication
Prerequisite: a grade of C or greater in ECET 4479. Advanced study of techniques and hardware employed in digital, microwave, satellite, and fiber optic communications. Three hours lecture, three hours lab. Four credit hours.

ECON – Economics

ECON 2301 Survey of Economics
The wants of individuals and societies are unlimited, while the resources for satisfying these wants are limited. Consequently, choices have to be made. Economics is the science of choice. Survey of Economics introduces students to the ability to use theories or models to make sense out of the real world and devise policy solutions to economic problems. Both individual and firm choices (microeconomics) and society choices (macroeconomics) are examined. The role of markets in summarizing choices and allocating resources is introduced. ECON 2301 will not satisfy the University Core Curriculum requirements if ECON 2322 and ECON 2323 are taken for graduation credit. Three credit hours.

ECON 2310 Business Statistics I
Prerequisite: MATH 1342 with grade of C or greater. An introduction to statistical methods from an economic and business perspective, including descriptive statistics, index numbers, probability theory as applied to statistical analysis, and an introduction to hypothesis testing. Three credit hours. (ACTS Course Number BUSI 2103)

ECON 2311 Business Statistics II
Prerequisite: ECON 2310. An introduction to regression analysis with emphasis on underlying assumptions, violations of assumptions, and possible corrective measures. Students are required to develop and estimate a realistic regression model and interpret results. Three credit hours.

ECON 2312 Quantitative Methods
Prerequisites: MATH 1342 with grade of C or greater, and ECON 2310. An introduction to quantitative methods frequently used in business. Topics include regression analysis, decision analysis and expected values, Chi Square, sampling techniques, forecasting, linear programming, simulation, transportation problems, and queuing analysis. Students shall complete a term project. Three credit hours.

ECON 2322 Principles of Microeconomics
Prerequisite: MATH 1302. The theory of the individual firm in the economy, cost and price determination, income distribution, and welfare economics. Three credit hours. (ACTS Course Number ECON 2203)

ECON 2323 Principles of Macroeconomics
Prerequisite: MATH 1302 and ECON 2322. The monetary system, macroeconomic analysis of income, employment, price level, business fluctuations, and elements of international trade. Three credit hours. (ACTS Course Number ECON 2103)

ECON 3301 Survey of Economics
An overview of the science of economics. Basic economic laws and methods are presented followed by a survey of the two primary areas of economics: microeconomics and macroeconomics. Students will be introduced to the functioning of markets and the choice process individuals and societies are faced with while making economic decisions. Not for credit by business or economics majors. Three credit hours.

ECON 3310 Money and Banking
Prerequisite: ECON 2323. The nature and functions of money and the development of the Federal Reserve System, the role and activities of the Federal Reserve in the development of monetary policy. Three credit hours.

ECON 3314 Mathematical Economics
Prerequisites: ECON 2311 or 2312, 2322, 2323. Analysis of economic problems and theory using mathematics. Mathematical methods are used to demonstrate economic principles. Three credit hours.

ECON 3315 Intermediate Microeconomic Analysis
Prerequisites: ECON 2310, 2322, 2323. Price and production theory. Consumer demand, the supply function, market pricing, and various degrees of competition. Three credit hours.

ECON 3320 Business Forecasting

Prerequisites: ECON 2312, 2322, 2323. Business fluctuations; seasonal, cyclical, trend, and secular components; measurement of fluctuations; and methods of predicting changes in business activity. Three credit hours.

ECON 3330 Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory
Prerequisites: ECON 2322, 2323. National income analysis and its implications for public policy; its historical development and present status, including recent business cycle development. Three credit hours.

ECON 3355 Quantitative Business Analysis
Prerequisite: MGMT 1310, ECON 2310, 70% score on qualifying exam. Students will use common business software in applications covering multiple regression and correlation, goodness of fit, chi square and tests of independence, decision analysis and expected values, analysis of variance, sampling techniques, forecasting (including how to decompose a time series into its components), and nonparametric tests. Three credit hours.

ECON 4305 Advanced Microeconomics
Prerequisite: ECON 3315 or equivalent. Theoretical microeconomics covering the theory of distribution, general equilibrium, welfare economics, and other advanced topics. Three credit hours.

ECON 4310 History of Economic Thought
Prerequisites: ECON 2322, 2323. The development of contemporary economic theory. A study of the development of economic concepts, methods of analysis, and philosophies and their relation to contemporary theory. Three credit hours.

ECON 4320 International Economics
Prerequisites: ECON 2322, 2323. The theory and mechanics of international trade; balance of payments problems, commercial policy, and international investments. Three credit hours.

ECON 4322 Resource Economics
Prerequisites: ECON 2322 and 2323 or equivalents. Applied microeconomics concentrating on natural resources as they are used to maximize society’s total utility. Both the theoretical and actual aspects of natural resources as inputs to the production process are explored. Three credit hours.

ECON 4324 Environmental Economics
Prerequisite: junior standing. Applied microeconomics covering various aspects of environmental economics. The problems of preventing future pollution and cleaning past pollution in an economically efficient manner are explored. Economic theory, actual practice, and legal aspects of pollution are explored in the context of the trade-offs that must be considered. Three credit hours.

ECON 4330 Public Finance
Prerequisites: ECON 2322, 2323. The economic functions of government, public goods theory. Public sector decision making, financing, and consequences; public sector growth and institutions. Three credit hours.

ECON 4340 Labor Economics
Prerequisites: ECON 2322, 2323. Economics of labor as a factor in the production process; legislative aspects of labor-management relations; measurement of human capital; effects of union growth; role of organized labor in the economy. Three credit hours.

ECON 4344 Introduction to Financial Economics
Prerequisites: ECON 2323 or equivalent. Survey of capital markets and security market efficiency and introduction to portfolio theory, capital asset pricing, and agency theory. Implications for corporate financial policy decisions and financial market regulatory policy. Three credit hours.

ECON 4347 Economics of Development
Prerequisites: ECON 2322 and 2323 or equivalents. The study of how countries change their productive arrangements and change real per-capita income over time. Various development strategies are discussed. Three credit hours.

ECON 4350 Applied Econometrics
Prerequisites: ECON 2312. This course will introduce students to the skills used in empirical research including, but not limited to, data collection, model specification, regression analysis, violations of regression assumptions and corrections, indicator variables, linear restrictions tests, and limited dependent variable models. The course will focus on the intuition and application of econometric methods and statistical software will be used extensively. Students will be required to complete an independent research project involving the application of regression analysis. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as ECON 5350. Three credit hours.

ECON 4360 Independent Study
Prerequisites: senior standing, consent of chairperson and instructor. Research and independent investigation in areas of economic analysis, economic policy, history of economic thought, and economic development. Three credit hours.

ECON 4396 Cooperative Education I
Prerequisites: senior standing, economics major, completion of at least 9 hours of upper-level economics courses with a grade of C or greater, cumulative GPA of 2.50, and consent of department chairperson prior to registration. Designated to complement and extend the classroom learning experience through the application of theories and concepts in a professional work environment. A written project, designed in consultation with the faculty member, and a minimum of 200 hours with a participating employer during the semester are required. The exact number of weekly work hours, activities, and responsibilities are dependent upon the nature of the work experience and must be specified in written agreements between the student, faculty member, and the Office of Cooperative Education. This course is accepted as elective credit in the economics major. Three credit hours.

ECON 4397 Seminar in Economics
Prerequisites: senior standing and consent of faculty teaching course. Advanced economic topics in modular format and usually team taught. Topics will come from both the microeconomic and macroeconomic areas and may vary according to need. Three credit hours.

ECON 4398 Teaching Internship
Prerequisite: consent of department chair and the supervising faculty. Working with individual instructors, upper-level majors assist students by holding study sessions twice a week for students enrolled in ECON 2310 or ECON 3355 and performing other tasks determined through consultation with the instructor. Unrestricted elective. Three credit hours.

EDFN – Educational Foundations

EDFN 1190 Career Planning and Life Options
A systematic approach to developing decision‐making skills and an orientation to the world of work. The focal point of the course is the student and his or her goals. Emphasis is on clarifying and formulating realistic career goals and an appropriate career plan and strategy to achieve these goals. Credit/no credit. One credit hour.

EDFN 2300 American Education
Prerequisite: sophomore standing. The philosophical, sociological, psychological, and historical foundations of American education, especially in public schools. The course will provide opportunities for each student to develop an official certification/degree plan and to apply for admission to the teacher education program. Three credit hours.

EDFN 3304 Assessment in the Middle School Curriculum
Study of available assessment methods and the integration of these methods in planning, modifying, and evaluating instruction, and in reporting outcomes to varied constituencies. After completing this course, students will meet basic assessment competencies as outlined in the Arkansas Principles for Licensure for Beginning Teachers and The Standards for Teacher Competence in the Educational Assessment of Students (1990). Three credit hours.

EDFN 3320 Introduction to Educational Psychology
Prerequisite: PSYC 2300. Applications of psychological principles to the learning and teaching processes; emphasis on learning, cognitive development, social development, discipline, intelligence, evaluation, and measurement. Three credit hours.

EDFN 4205 Diagnostic and Evaluative Procedures in Education
A study of fundamental statistical concepts and their use in understanding standardized test results. Emphasis on the exploration of qualitative methods and evaluating and reporting progress. Two credit hours.

EDFN 4158, 4258, 4358, 4458 Educational Foundations Workshop
Designed to strengthen offerings in education and meet the needs of teachers for further training at the in‐service level. One, two, three, or four credit hours.

EDFN 4100, 4200, 4300, 4400, 4500 Independent Study in Educational Foundations
In‐depth study of topics in educational foundations for pre‐ service elementary teachers, junior or senior high school teachers, or adult education teachers. One, two, three, four, or five credit hours.

ENGL – English

Courses in Literature (ENGL)

ENGL 2335 Introduction to Literature
For the beginning student of literature. Topics vary and include selections from poetry, fiction, and drama. Three credit hours.

ENGL 2337 World Literature
Prerequisite: completion of the first year writing requirement. Study of selected texts reflecting various Western and non-Western literary heritages and traditions. Assigned works represent several national literatures, with at least one major text from each of four periods (antiquity, medieval, early modern, and the modern period) and from a minimum of three literary genres. Three credit hours.(ACTS Course Number ENGL 2113)

ENGL 2338 World Literature Themes
Prerequisite: completion of the first year writing requirement. This class addresses the same competencies as ENGL 2337, but through exploration of a specific topic. Either 2337 or 2338 satisfies the core requirement, but they are distinctive courses and both may be taken for credit. Three credit hours.

ENGL 2339 Mythology
This course will examine myths from around the world, exploring how archetypal themes and motifs reflect shared moral, philosophic, and aesthetic concerns. An emphasis will be placed on how these myths are transmitted across literary periods and how they remain relevant to contemporary life. Three credit hours.

ENGL 3321 American Literature I
Selected works from the earliest writings to American romanticism. Three credit hours.

ENGL 3322 American Literature II
Selected works from the period beginning with the romantic movement and ending with the Civil War. Three credit hours.

ENGL 3323 American Literature III
Selected works from the period beginning with the Civil War and ending in 1912. Three credit hours.

ENGL 3324 Arkansas Writers
A survey of Arkansas writers of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Three credit hours.

ENGL 3325 Literature of the South
Presentation of representative southern writers. Emphasis on writers of the southern renaissance of the twentieth century. Three credit hours.

ENGL 3326 African-American Literature I
African Americans in American culture from the colonial period to the twentieth century as expressed through the literary works of African-American writers. Three credit hours.

ENGL 3327 African-American Literature II
The writings of representative African American authors from 1900 to the present, with emphasis on the literature of Africa, the West Indies, and African-America. Three credit hours.

ENGL 3330 Approaches to Literature
Required for English majors. The course introduces the basics of literary research, critical methods, and critical writing. Though not a prerequisite for any other English course, students are strongly recommended to take this class early. Three credit hours.

ENGL 3331 Major British Writers I
Major writers of English literature to the mid-eighteenth century, including Chaucer, Shakespeare, and Milton. Three credit hours.

ENGL 3332 Major British Writers II
Major writers of English literature from the mid-eighteenth century to the present. Three credit hours.

ENGL 3340 Women in Literature
Literature by and about women, with emphasis on works by nineteenth- and twentieth-century writers. Three credit hours.

ENGL 3344 Modern Drama
A close analysis of selected British, American, and European plays. Three credit hours.

ENGL 3346 The Form and Theory of Fiction
Survey of the forms, techniques, and theories of fiction, emphasizing the views of fiction writers. Three credit hours.

ENGL 3360 Selected Topics in Literature
Special topics in literature, varying each semester. Topics cross geographic and temporal lines and usually deal with a specific genre or a theme. Three credit hours.

ENGL 3361 The Film as Literature
An introduction to the capabilities of film as literature, using many genres as illustration. Three credit hours.

ENGL 3370 Fundamentals of Folklore
The folklore process among Americans and other cultural groups. The dynamics of the folk event, the theory and applications of folklore, and practical field experience. Three credit hours.

ENGL 4100, 4200 Independent Study
Prerequisites: senior standing and 18 hours of English. Open to English majors only. For the student of superior ability who seeks special research in the field. One or two credit hours.

ENGL 4150, 4250 Honors Seminar
Prerequisite: consent of program director. Focused study of topics in language and literature. One or two credit hours.

ENGL 4160, 4260 Honors Tutorial
Prerequisite: consent of program director. Independent study of topics in literature and language. One or two credit hours.

ENGL 4199 Seminar in Career Perspectives
Required for majors. A capstone course for English majors for purposes of developing and assessing their career, educational, and personal goals. One credit hour.

ENGL 4202 Teaching Literature in Secondary Schools
A methods course team-taught by faculty from the Departments of English and Rhetoric and Writing. Topics to be addressed include making classroom presentations, managing small-group work, responding to student writing, evaluating and using secondary school literature and composition textbooks, approaches to teaching literature, and writing as a way to reading. To be taken in conjunction with RHET 4202. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as ENGL 5202. Two credit hours.

ENGL 4270 Honors Project
Prerequisite: consent of program director. Honor projects are typically scholarly or creative works. Program advisors and director must approve all projects. Two credit hours.

ENGL 4311 Medieval Literature
Students will discuss, analyze, and research works in English literature from A.D. 450 to 1500 as well as works in translation from medieval German, Latin, and romance literature. Students with credit for ENGL 4311 may take ENGL 5311 with instructor approval. Three credit hours.

ENGL 4312 Chaucer
Selected works including Troilus and Criseyde and The Canterbury Tales. Three credit hours.

ENGL 4313 Arthurian Literature
A study of Arthurian chronicle and romance from Celtic beginnings through Malory, with examination of nineteenth- and twentieth-century developments of the legend. Three credit hours.

ENGL 4314 Topics in Medieval and Renaissance Literature
Students will discuss, analyze and research selected topics in medieval and Renaissance literature. Students with credit for ENGL 4314 may enroll in ENGL 5314 with instructor’s approval. Three credit hours.

ENGL 4321 English Renaissance Drama
Major playwrights, including Marlowe, Kyd, Jonson, Beaumont, Fletcher, and Webster; excluding Shakespeare. Three credit hours.

ENGL 4324 Shakespeare
Selected works, including the major comedies and tragedies. Three credit hours.

ENGL 4325 Teaching Shakespeare Through Performance
Pedagogical focus on teaching plays, particularly Shakespeare’s, in the elementary and secondary schools by using performance activities. Special emphasis on the four most often taught Shakespearean plays (Romeo and Juliet, Julius Caesar, Macbeth, Hamlet); one comedy and one history play included but titles may change each time the course is offered. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as ENGL 5325. Three credit hours.

ENGL 4328 Seventeenth-Century Literature
English poetry and prose from 1600 to 1660, with emphasis on Donne and Milton. Three credit hours.

ENGL 4331 Restoration and Early Eighteenth-Century Literature
Restoration drama; Dryden, Swift, early Pope. Three credit hours.

ENGL 4332 Mid and Late Eighteenth-Century Literature
Later Pope, the novel, Johnson. Three credit hours.

ENGL 4341 Romantic Poetry
Representative works of Blake, Coleridge, Wordsworth, Byron, Keats, and Shelley. Three credit hours.

ENGL 4343 Victorian Literature
Representative writers, including Tennyson, Browning, Arnold, and Hopkins. Three credit hours.

ENGL 4345 Topics in Nineteenth-Century Literature
Students will discuss, analyze, and research selected topics in British and American literature of the nineteenth century. Students with credit for ENGL 4345 may enroll in ENGL 5345 with instructor approval. Three credit hours.

ENGL 4350 Honors Seminar
This course is a focused examination of a variety of special topics in language and literature. Three credit hours.

ENGL 4351 British Novel I
Representative readings in the development of the British novel in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Three credit hours.

ENGL 4352 British Novel II
Representative readings in the development of the British novel in the twentieth century. Three credit hours.

ENGL 4355 Readings in European Fiction
Representative readings in European fiction from the eighteenth century to the present. Three credit hours.

ENGL 4360 Topics in Modern Literature
Selected topics in modern literature. Three credit hours.

ENGL 4364 Modern Poetry
Representative readings in modern English and American poetry including works by Hopkins, Yeats, Frost, and Eliot. Three credit hours.

ENGL 4365 Modern Novel
Reading of American and British novels of the Modernist period. Three credit hours.

ENGL 4366 Contemporary Literature
Students will discuss, analyze, and research the major trends in fiction, poetry, and drama since 1945, with emphasis on British, American, and European writers. Students with credit for ENGL 4366 may enroll in ENGL 5366 with instructor approval. Three credit hours.

ENGL 4367 Short Story Survey
Wide reading of American and foreign short fiction. Three credit hours.

ENGL 4368 Literary Criticism
Students will discuss, analyze, and research the major literary theories, with emphasis on recent issues. Three credit hours.

ENGL 4369 The Form and Theory of Poetry
Survey of the forms, techniques, and theories of poetry, emphasizing the views of poets. Three credit hours.

ENGL 4370 Seminar in Language or Literature
Prerequisites: senior standing and consent of instructor. Selected topics in language or literature. May be repeated when topic differs. Three credit hours.

ENGL 4371 Advanced Folklore: Selected Topics
Selected topics such as native American traditions, folklore in Arkansas, trickster motifs in oral and written story. Three credit hours.

ENGL 4375 Adolescent Literature
In this course, students will read and discuss a wide variety of adolescent novels and adolescent short fiction (some written specifically for adolescents; others written from an adolescent perspective). Students with credit for ENGL 4375 may not take ENGL 5375. Three credit hours.

ENGL 4380 Studies in Major American Writers
The study of one major figure in American literature. Subject varies. Three credit hours.

ENGL 4381 American Fiction
Representative readings in the development of American fiction. Three credit hours.

ENGL 4384 American Poetry
Representative readings in American poetry from the beginnings to 1912. Three credit hours.

ENGL 4390 Internship
Prerequisites: junior standing, consent of instructor. Provides practical experience in a professional setting. Students work in a business, school, state agency, or similar location that offers opportunities to apply their academic background and skills. Course may be repeated for credit. Three credit hours.

Top

Courses in Creative Writing (ENGL)

Creative writing courses (except ENGL 2336) may be repeated for credit one time.

ENGL 2336 Introduction to Creative Writing
Prerequisites: RHET 1311, 1312, or consent of instructor. Study and practice in the writing of fiction, poetry, and drama. Class discussion/workshop. Three credit hours.

ENGL 3318 Fiction Writing I
Prerequisite: ENGL 2336 or consent of instructor. Study and practice in the writing of fiction. Class discussion/workshop and individual conferences. Three credit hours.

ENGL 3319 Poetry Writing I
Prerequisite: ENGL 2336 or consent of instructor. Study and practice in the writing of poetry. Class discussion/workshop and individual conferences. Three credit hours.

ENGL 3320 Screenwriting
Prerequisite: ENGL 2336. Individual work in dramatic writing for film and television. Class discussion and individual conferences. Three credit hours.

ENGL 3346 The Form and Theory of Fiction
See literature course listing.

ENGL 4301 Advanced Creative Writing Project
Prerequisites: three creative writing classes or consent of instructor. Independent study in the writing of fiction, poetry, or drama. Three credit hours.

ENGL 4116, 4216, 4316 Seminar in Creative Writing
Prerequisites: ENGL 4398, 4399, or consent of instructor. Continued study and practice in creative writing. Class discussion/studio workshop/field placement. May be repeated when the topic varies. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as ENGL 5116, 5216, 5316. One, two, or three credit hours.

ENGL 4369 The Form and Theory of Poetry
See literature course listing.

ENGL 4398 Fiction Writing II
Prerequisites: ENGL 2336, 3318, or consent of instructor. Continued study and practice in the writing of fiction. Class discussion/workshop and individual conferences. Three credit hours.

ENGL 4399 Poetry Writing II
Prerequisites: ENGL 2336, 3319, or consent of instructor. Continued study and practice in the writing of poetry. Class discussion/workshop and individual conferences. Three credit hours.

Courses in Language and Linguistics (ENGL)

ENGL 2311 Vocabulary Building
Study of Greek and Latin origins and word families. Three credit hours.

ENGL 3311 History of the English Language
Development of the English language from the Old English period to the present. Three credit hours.

ENGL 3312 Grammar, Morphology, & Syntax
Studies in the structure of modern English. Three credit hours.

ENGL 3313 Introduction to the Study of Language
An introductory linguistics course. Includes phonology, syntax, and semantics. Three credit hours.

ENGL 3314 Phonology and Dialect
A study of English dialects and the dynamics of dialectic variation and use. Three credit hours.

ENGL 4100, 4200 Independent Study
Prerequisites: senior standing, 18 hours of English. Open to English majors only. For the student of superior ability who seeks special research in the field. One or two credit hours.

ENGL 4202 Teaching Literature in Secondary Schools
A methods course team-taught by faculty from the Departments of English and Rhetoric and Writing. Topics to be addressed include making classroom presentations, managing small-group work, responding to student writing, evaluating and using secondary school literature and composition textbooks, approaches to teaching literature, and writing as a way to reading. To be taken in conjunction with RHET 4202. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as ENGL 5202. Two credit hours.

ENGL 4315 World Englishes
A study of national, regional, and social varieties of English with special attention to the political, cultural, and economic issues facing the use of English as a world language or lingua franca. Recommended prerequisite: ENGL 3311 or ENGL 3313. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as ENGL 5315. Three credit hours.

ENGL 4317 Literary Linguistics
An application of recent theories and methodologies of linguistics and language arts to the reading, analysis, and appreciation of literature. Recommended prerequisite: ENGL 3311 or ENGL 3313. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as ENGL 5317. Three credit hours.

ENGL 4325 Teaching Shakespeare Through Performance
Pedagogical focus on teaching Shakespeare’s plays in elementary and secondary schools by using performance activities. Special emphasis on Romeo and Juliet, Julius Caesar, Macbeth, and Hamlet. One comedy and one history play included by titles, may change each time the course is offered. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as ENGL 5325. Three credit hours.

ENGL 4370 Seminar in Language or Literature
Prerequisites: senior standing, consent of instructor. Selected topics in language or literature. May be repeated when topic differs. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as ENGL 5370. Three credit hours.

ENHS – Environmental Health Sciences

ENHS 2320 Introduction to Environmental Health Sciences
Prerequisites: BIOL 1401 or BIOL 1400, MATH 1302, CPSC 1370. This course is designed to provide individuals with the basic elements of environmental health sciences. Lectures will be presented concerning environmental media assessment, water supplies, water quality, air pollution, environment and energy relationships, land use, and environmental impact analysis. Three hours lecture per week. Three credit hours.

ENHS 2120 Introduction to Environmental Health Sciences Laboratory
Prerequisite or Corequisite: Completion of ENHS 2320 with a grade of “C” or better or consent of the instructor and concurrent enrollment in ENHS 2320. The introduction to environmental health sciences laboratory will emphasize experiments, field-based data collection and analysis methods, computer exercises, and laboratory methods. Two hours laboratory per week. One credit hour.

ENHS 3310 Environmental Regulations
Prerequisite: ENHS 2320 or equivalent. The basis for regulation of environmental pollutant sources and natural resources. The environmental litigation process is reviewed with reference to appropriate federal, state, and local regulations. Case studies will be used to supplement class lectures. Three hours lecture per week. Three credit hours.

ENHS 3340 Introduction to Water Resources Management
Prerequisites: ENHS 2320, CHEM 1403, BIOL 2401, MATH 1302, or the equivalents. Concepts related to the management of surface and ground water resources; sources of environmental pollutants, sampling methods and pollution control alternatives; the application of computers to water resource management problems. Three hours lecture per week. Three credit hours.

ENHS 3350 Principles of Air Pollution
Prerequisites: ENHS 2320, CHEM 1403, MATH 1302, or the equivalents. The principles of air quality monitoring, air pollution transport and control methods; effects of air pollutants on health and natural resources; dispersion modeling techniques. Three hours lecture per week. Three credit hours.

ENHS 3391 Cooperative Education in Environmental Health Sciences
Prerequisites: junior standing, acceptance as an environmental health sciences major, minimum GPA of 2.50, and consent of program director. Cooperative education seeks to integrate academic and professional work experiences. Students will be placed in a work setting consistent with their environmental education career objectives. This course requires a minimum of 200 semester work hours. Three credit hours.

ENHS 4189, 4289, 4389 Research in Environmental Health Sciences
Prerequisites: senior standing, consent of instructor. For students who want to carry out individual research. The student is expected to spend two to four hours per week on the project for each hour of credit earned. The exact hourly commitment per week will depend on the nature of the project and will be agreed on in advance by the student and the instructor. One, two, or three credit hours.

ENHS 4190 Seminar in Environmental Health Sciences
Prerequisites or corequisites: ENHS 2320, 4415, senior standing, consent of instructor. Discussions of current and emerging environmental health sciences problems. One hour of discussion per week. One credit hour.

ENHS 4320 Introduction to Industrial Hygiene
Prerequisites: ENHS 3310, CHEM 2450 or 3350 and 3150, MATH 1302, or the equivalents. Recognition, evaluation, and control methods for environmental hazards in the workplace; instrumentation techniques for personal and ambient sampling. Regulations appropriate to industrial hygiene are reviewed for various work settings. Three hours lecture per week. Three credit hours.

ENHS 4391 Cooperative Education in Environmental Health Sciences
Prerequisites: junior standing, major in environmental health sciences, minimum GPA of 2.50, minimum of one semester of ENHS 3391, and consent of program director. Cooperative education seeks to integrate academic and professional work experiences. Students will be placed in a work setting consistent with their environmental education career objectives. This course requires a minimum of 200 semester work hours. Three credit hours.

ENHS 4199-4399 Special Topics in Environmental Health Sciences
Prerequisite: senior standing as environmental health sciences major or consent of instructor. Topics include specialized areas of environmental health sciences. Credit will vary and will be appropriate for both advanced undergraduate and graduate students. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog at the 5000-level. One, two, or three hours lecture per week. One, two, or three credit hours.

ENHS 4410 Environmental Planning
Prerequisite: ENHS 3310 or the equivalent. Environmental planning process and evaluation methods applicable to environmental programs; resource allocation and procurement; emphasis on environmental planning case studies including watershed planning, land use, solid and hazardous waste, air quality, wastewater treatment facilities planning, wetlands, and master planning. Group discussions and role-playing exercises will supplement class lectures. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week. Four credit hours.

ENHS 4415 Environmental Impact Analysis
Prerequisites: ENHS 3340 or 3350, RHET 3316, BIOL 3303 and 3103, STAT 2350, or consent of instructor. Knowledge and skills necessary to prepare and review environmental impact assessments and statements. The content of the National Environmental Policy Act is presented and analyzed. Case studies and group discussions are used to supplement class lectures. Field studies are performed on a selected site for which an environmental impact assessment will be written. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week. Four credit hours.

ENHS 4430 Environmental Epidemiology
Prerequisites: ENHS 3340 or 3350, BIOL 2401, STAT 2350, or consent of instructor. The principles of environmental epidemiology are introduced with emphasis on application to various environmental settings. A brief introduction to vital statistics is provided. Health effects of various environmental agents will be identified with appropriate indicators and epidemiological methods for environmental health sciences professionals to monitor environmental effects. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as ENHS 5430. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week. Four credit hours.

ENHS 4295-4695 Internship in Environmental Health Sciences
Prerequisites: Senior standing, consent of instructor. Supervised internship with state, local, and federal agencies and industries concerned with environmental programs. Forty clock hours per hour of credit. Two, three, four, five, or six credit hours.

ERSC – Earth Science

ERSC 1102 Physical Geology Laboratory
Prerequisite or corequisite: ERSC 1302. A laboratory course designed to accompany ERSC 1302. Students observe, gather and manipulate data, interpret data, and make field measurements using minerals, rocks, graphs, and maps. The laboratory meets for two hours per week. One credit hour. (ACTS Course Number GEOL 1114 when taken with ERSC 1302)

ERSC 1103 Historical Geology Laboratory
Prerequisite or corequisite: ERSC 1303. A laboratory course designed to accompany ERSC 1303. Students are involved with geologic data gathering, manipulation, and interpretation along with field measurements and problem solving. Two hours laboratory per week. One credit hour. (ACTS Course Number GEOL 1134 when taken with ERSC 1303)

ERSC 1104 Earth and the Environment Lab
Prerequisite or corequisite: ERSC 1304. A laboratory course designed to accompany ERSC 1304. Students make observations and interpretations from case studies, gather, manipulate, and interpret data, and make field measurements and problem solve using minerals, rocks, graphs, and the UALR campus. The laboratory meets for two hours per week. One credit hour.

ERSC 1302 Physical Geology
An introduction to the science of geology, the geological view of the human environment, how geologists learn about Planet Earth, and how society and geology interact. Active learning applied to natural processes shaping the earth’s surface, producing the solid and fluid earth, and historical development of geological paradigms. Three hours lecture per week. Three credit hours. (ACTS Course Number GEOL 1114 when taken with ERSC 1102)

ERSC 1303 Historical Geology
An introduction to the science of geology, how geologists have learned about the Earth using geologic time as a theme. Active learning applied to various measurements of time, the documentation of evolutionary changes presented by the geologic record, and the development of geologic paradigms used in interpreting this record. Three hours lecture per week. Three credit hours. (ACTS Course Number GEOL 1134 when taken with ERSC 1103)

ERSC 1304 Earth and the Environment
This is an introductory course environmental geology course that examines interactions between human beings and our changing planet, the affects of natural/geologic hazards on humans, and anthropogenic (human-caused) impacts on nature, geology, and society. Fundamental geologic concepts such as plate tectonics, geologic time, and surficial processes are used as a basis for understanding a variety of natural processes. The course topics include natural and anthropogenic geologic hazards (earthquakes, volcanoes, landslides, and land subsidence), climate change, environmental issues, as well as the impact of mineral extraction and water resource utilization.

ERSC 1305 Science Skills
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. This course will help biology, chemistry, and earth science students reach their educational objectives. Interactive instructional methods promote the development of skills that lead to success in college and a successful career in science. Students I) identify and use appropriate campus resources, 2) master common computer programs, 3) learn graphing and statistical methods, 4) develop better strategies to manage money, time, and stress wisely, and 5) explore the research conducted by UALR science faculty. Grading is based on projects, attendance, and participation. This course cannot be used for credit toward a biology, chemistry, or earth science major or minor. Three credit hours.

ERSC 2300 Science and Technology in Society
Recommended prerequisite: RHET 1311. Introduction to how society is impacted by and responds to science-driven decision-making. Examines how society embraces and applies (including governmental institutions) scientific principles and technological advances to solving global societal problems such as sustainability of natural resources, development of new energy resources due to population and economic growth, changes in climate and weather, pollution, and human health issues. Case studies will examine societal response (particularly governmental) to both past and current global scientific and technological issues.

ERSC 3320 Field Geology I
Prerequisites: ERSC 1302, ERSC 1102. Corequisites: ERSC 1303, ERSC 1103. Introduction to geologic field methods. Topics include: outcrop description; map and aerial photo interpretation; navigation skills; stratigraphic section measurement; cross-section construction; GPS and GIS techniques; computer drafting techniques; and geologic mapping in the Ouachita Mountains. One hour lecture, four hours laboratory per week. Three credit hours.

ERSC 3380 Oceanography
Prerequisite: 4 hours of earth science, biology, chemistry, or physics. This course provides an introduction to the historical, physical, chemical, geological, and biological aspects of the oceans and their importance to the global system. Three hours lecture per week. Three credit hours.

ERSC 3390 Weather Studies
Prerequisite: 4 hours of earth science, biology, chemistry or physics. This course provides an overview of how the distribution of heat, atmospheric circulation, humidity, and air pressure forms local, regional and global weather conditions. The course will include analysis of recent meteorological events that demonstrate basic principles of how weather patterns evolve. May not be counted for BS in Geology. Three hours lecture per week. Three credit hours.

ERSC 3410 Mineralogy
Prerequisites: ERSC 1302, ERSC 1102 and CHEM 1402 or consent of instructor. Introduction to the concepts of crystal chemistry, petrography, and the geochemical analysis of important rock-forming minerals. Laboratory includes hand-specimen and microscopic identification of minerals and use of computer software to examine crystal structures. A term project and field trip are required. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week. Four credit hours.

ERSC 3430 Structural Geology
Prerequisites: ERSC 3410 and MATH 1303 or equivalent. The description and analysis of geological structures in Earth’s crust. Topics covered include the description of geological structures, stress, strain, rheology, the kinematics and dynamics of folding and faulting and microstructural analysis. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week. Four credit hours.

ERSC 3440 Sedimentology and Stratigraphy
Prerequisite: ERSC 1302/1102 and ERSC 1303/1103; Corequisite ERSC 3410 or consent of instructor. This course covers the properties, processes and depositional environments of sediments and sedimentary rocks. Lateral and vertical relationships between rock units and how these can be used to understand geologic resources and interpret Earth history are also covered. Three hours lecture, two hours lab per week. Field trips required. Four credit hours.

ERSC 3411 Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology
Prerequisite: C or better in ERSC 3410. Composition, characteristics, classification, occurrence, and petrogenesis of the igneous and metamorphic rocks. Megascopic and microscopic methods of description. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week. Four credit hours.

ERSC 3460 Paleobiology
Prerequisites: ERSC 1303/1103, or BIOL 1400 or 1401, or consent of instructor; ERSC 3320 recommended. The evolution and ecological structure of the biosphere from the origin of life to the present emphasizing the evolution and paleobiology of animal life as shown by the fossil record. Lectures discuss the methods used to interpret the fossil record, and cover topics such as ontogeny, speciation, phylogeny and systematics, functional anatomy, biogeography, biostratigraphy, paleoecology, and macroevolution. Laboratories will focus on paleobiological principles that can be demonstrated by the major groups of invertebrates that are common in the geologic record. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week; one 1-2 day field trip. Four credit hours.

ERSC 4100, 4200, 4300 Independent Problems
Prerequisite: consent of instructor, generally given only with senior standing and/or 20 hours of geology. Field or laboratory problem in consultation with instructor. One, two, or three hours or equivalent per week. One, two, or three credit hours.

ERSC 4190 Senior Seminar
Prerequisite: Senior standing and geology major or minor. Discussion of current topics in geology and career preparation. Semester project presentation is required. One hour per week. One credit hour.

ERSC 4304 Geology of North America
Prerequisites: ERSC 1303/1103, 3360. Detailed history of North America and its life forms as interpreted from rock and fossil records. Principles of interpretation, geologic and biologic succession of events, and advanced individual interpretation of geologic maps, with reports. Two hours lecture, two hours laboratory (or equivalent) per week. Three credit hours.

ERSC 4320 Field Geology II
Prerequisites: ERSC 3320, ERSC 3430 and ERSC 3440. Advanced geologic mapping techniques. Three weeks of field work and instruction at various locations in the United States. Three credit hours. Requires 8 hours in the field every day for three weeks. Additional fee for transportation, food and other field costs. Three credit hours.

ERSC 4322 Environmental Geology
Prerequisite: ERSC 1302/1102 and MATH 1302 or consent of instructor. Humans as a geologic agents, geologic hazards in the environment, geology and land use studies, urban geology, and case histories. Dual-listed as ERSC 5322. Three hours lecture per week. Three credit hours.

ERSC 4323 Geology of Arkansas
Prerequisites: ERSC 1302/1102 or 1303/1103 or consent of instructor. Regional geomorphology, structure, stratigraphy, and paleontology of Arkansas. Includes field trips to Ozark dome, Ouachita fold belt, Arkansas Valley, and Mississippi Embayment/Gulf Coastal Plain. Dual-listed as ERSC 5323. Three hours lecture per week, field trips. Three credit hours.

ERSC 4340 Stratigraphy
Prerequisite: ERSC 3440. Course will describe and interpret the governing stratigraphic principals and methods of correlation of sedimentary rocks. The role of sedimentary environments, climate and tectonics on sedimentation patterns will be examined. Three hours lecture per week.

ERSC 4353 Geology and Ecology of Bahamas
Prerequisites: Eight hours of core science and consent of instructor. This course explores the geology and ecology of the shallow-water marine environment by examining the preeminent modern example, the Bahamas platform. The Bahamas provide an excellent model for understanding modern and ancient carbonate and reef deposits, and variety of terrestrial/aquatic habitats. Biological processes are ultimately responsible for many of the geological features of the Bahamas, so the course considers the biology/ecology of marine organisms in addition to geological topics. The field component is based at the Gerace Field Center for Geological, Biological, and Anthropological Research on San Salvador Island, Bahamas. Seventy-five hours of lecture/laboratory/field activity. Dual-listed as ERSC 5353. Three credit hours.

ERSC 4371 Engineering Geology
Prerequisite: MATH 1303 or higher or the consent of instructor. The study of the interaction of rock, soil and geologic processes with the engineering activities of man by applying geological data, techniques and principles. The integration of geological, geotechnical and geophysical investigative methods will be emphasized. Lecture topics will include soil and rock mechanics and rock deformation, the assessment of the spatial-temporal variability of sub surface materials, slope stability analysis and slope failure mitigation, earthquake engineering, hydrologic system management, and the application of GIS and geology. Dual-listed as ERSC 5371. Two hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week. Three credit hours.

ERSC 4372 Surface Water Hydrology
Prerequisites: ERSC 1302/1102 or higher and MATH 1311 or 1451. Hydrologic cycle, basin analysis, runoff analysis, stream hydraulics, flooding, case histories, field methods in hydrology, hydrologic planning. Three hours lecture per week. Three credit hours. Dual-Listed as ERSC 5372.

ERSC 4389 Undergraduate Research
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Various topics for thorough research selected by students in consultation with an advisor. Field work and/or experimental or laboratory work resulting in a report to be critiqued by at least two faculty members (no oral defense). The student is expected to spend at least nine hours per week on the project. The exact hourly commitment per week will depend on the nature of the project and will be agreed on in advance by the student and the instructor. Three credit hours.

ERSC 4391 Cooperative Education in Earth Science
Prerequisites: Consent and approval of assignment by advisor. Supervised professional experience related to students discipline with governmental agencies, industry and consulting firms. This course requires a minimum of 200 semester work hours. Dual listed as ERSC 5391. Three credit hours.

ERSC 4195, 4295, 4395 Internship in Earth Science
Prerequisites: Consent and approval of assignment by advisor. Supervised professional experience related to students discipline with governmental agencies, industry, and consulting firms. Forty hours supervised work per credit hour. One, two, or three credit hours.

ERSC 4419 Geomorphology
Prerequisites: ERSC 1302, ERSC 1102, ERSC 3320, or consent of instructor. The study of form and process at the Earth’s surface. The interactions between erosional and depositional processes at the Earth’s surface with tectonic processes operating within the Earth are examined with respect to landform evolution. Laboratory includes the analysis of maps, digital imagery, and field applications of GPS/GIS technology. Dual-listed as ERSC 5419. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory or field study per week. Four credit hours.

ERSC 4421 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS)
Prerequisites: consent of instructor. This course introduces Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and the use of spatial data for problem-solving in science. The lecture portion of the course focuses on the data models used to represent spatial features and on the processes involved in creating, acquiring, analyzing, and displaying georeferenced information. The laboratory portion of the course employs a project-based methodology including applications from geology, biology, environmental science, and political science to foster basic GIS software proficiency. Dual-listed as ERSC 5421. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week. Four credit hours.

ERSC 4422 Applied GIS
Prerequisites: BIOL/ERSC 4421 or consent of instructor. This course builds on the fundamental concepts of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) from ERSC 4421 Introduction to GIS. It focuses on advanced applications in GIS with an emphasis on problem-solving, advanced analysis techniques, and database management. Dual listed as ERSC 5422. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week. Four credit hours.

ERSC 4426 Introduction to Remote Sensing
Prerequisites: ERSC/BIOL 4421 or consent of instructor. This course introduces the fundamentals of manipulating and interpreting the electromagnetic spectrum. The lecture portion of the class covers concepts of remote sensing, including how data is collected, processed, analyzed, and interpreted. The lab portion of the class is focused on building proficiency in several images processing software programs and the use of spatial data for problem-solving in science. Dual listed as ERSC 5426. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week. Four credit hours.

ERSC 4473 Hydrogeology
Prerequisites: ERSC 1302/1102 or ERSC 1303/1103 and MATH 1302 or higher. Ground water occurrence, flow, porosity, permeability, aquifer analysis, geology of ground water, water well logging, water chemistry, water quality, well development, case histories, field methods, hydrogeologic planning. Dual-listed as ERSC 5473. Three hours lecture and two hours lab per week. Four credit hours.

ERSC 4199, 4299, 4399, 4499 Special Topics
Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Advanced and specialized topics in the geological sciences, especially those of current interest. Refer to semester schedule for special topic offered. Credit will vary depending upon course topic. One, two, three, or four hours or equivalent per week. One, two, three, or four credit hours.

ETME – Engineering Technology (Mechanical)

ETME 1110 FYE: Mechanical Engineering Technology
Review of educational goals. Management of time. Balancing work and course load. Use of campus resources. Planning educational and experience goals, including cooperative education, licensing and certification. Role and practice of engineering technology including career paths in Mechanical Engineering Technology. Two-hour lab, 1 credit hour. Course is a graduation requirement but not a degree requirement.

ETME 1300 Computer Graphics
Study of graphics and the types of engineering drawings used in design. Sketching and computer aided design tools are used to create the various types of views needed for design and documentation. Two hours lecture and three hours lab. Three credit hours.

ETME 2117 Manufacturing Processes Laboratory
Prerequisite or corequisite: ETME 2317. Introduction to machine shop equipment and processes; metal fabricating applications, including metal cutting, such as turning, drilling, milling; welding, and measurement and inspection, Course project and the application of Ethics and safety in design and manufacturing, One three-hour lab, One credit hour

ETME 2191 Cooperative Education
Prerequisites: sophomore standing in engineering technology and approval of department’s chairperson; cumulative GPA of 2.50; minimum GPA of 2.30 for previous semester. Industrial experience under supervision of faculty advisor to supplement course work. Students who take this course may not take 2291. Requires at least 240 contact hours on the job. One credit hour.

ETME 2291 Cooperative Education
Prerequisites: sophomore standing and approval of department’s chairperson; cumulative GPA of 2.50; minimum GPA of 2.30 for previous semester. Industrial experience under supervision of advisor to supplement course work. Students who take this course may not take 2191. Requires at least 480 contact hours on the job. Two credit hours.

ETME 2302 Properties of Materials
Physical structure of metals, properties, testing, phase diagrams, and applications. Ferrous metals, metal treatment, nonferrous metals, corrosion, plastics, other engineering materials and applications. Two hours lecture, two hours lab. Three credit hours.

ETME 2303 Computer-Aided Design (CAD)
Prerequisites: a grade of C or greater in ETME 1300 and basic computer skills, or consent of instructor. A study of 2D and 3D computer aided design software used in industry. Detailed and working drawings, and design documentation using CAD. Importing and exporting CAD data is covered as well as various methods of output. Introduction to 3D modeling. Two hours lecture, three hours lab. Three credit hours.

ETME 2310 Applied Statics
Corequisite: MATH 1311. An analysis of force systems applied to rigid bodies at rest. Application of principles on computation of reactions, shears, moments, and forces for simple structures. Centroids and moments of inertia are included. Two hours lecture, two hours lab. Three credit hours.

ETME 2317 Manufacturing Processes
Traditional manufacturing processes such as casting, forging, cold working; metal removal processes such as turning, milling, drilling, finishing processes, metal joining, and plastics. Manufacturing process laboratory course is available. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

ETME 2320 Fluid Mechanics and Power
Prerequisite: a grade of C or greater in MATH 1303. Hydraulics and pneumatics; the flow of water, air, and oil; calibration of metering devices; pipe friction; elementary hydraulic tests; friction and energy loss; and devices for making fluid measurements. Two hours lecture, two hours lab. Three credit hours.

ETME 2333 Advanced Computer-Aided Design
Prerequisites: a grade of C or greater in ETME 2303, or consent of instructor. Graphic design process using an interactive computer-aided design system. Includes sophisticated functions beyond two-dimensional shape and size description and three-dimensional capabilities of CAD/CAM systems in advanced design situations. Calculation and analysis programs are used to improve the students’ design. Students work on design problems related to their chosen field using the CAD system. Two hours lecture, three hours lab. Three credit hours.

ETME 3191 Cooperative Education
Prerequisites: junior standing in engineering technology and approval of department’s chairperson; cumulative GPA of 2.50, minimum GPA of 2.30 for previous semester. Industrial experience under supervision of advisor to supplement course work. Students who take this course may not take 3291. Requires at least 240 contact hours on the job. One credit hour.

ETME 3291 Cooperative Education
Prerequisites: junior standing in engineering technology and approval of chairperson; cumulative GPA of 2.50; minimum GPA of 2.30 for previous semester. Work experience related to student objectives under supervision of advisor. Students who take this course may not take 3191. Requires at least 480 contact hours on the job. Two credit hours.

ETME 3300 Independent Study
Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Study of assigned topics chosen to develop investigative, analytical, research, or professional skills related to engineering. The student spends 8 to 10 hours per week on the project. The exact hourly commitment depends on the complexity of the project and is agreed on in advance by the student and the instructor. Three credit hours.

ETME 3301 Applied Mechanics of Materials
Prerequisites: MATH 1311, 1304, or 1451, ETME 2302, a grade of C or greater in ETME 3317 or consent of the instructor. Topics include stress and strain, direct and shearing stresses, torsion, bending, deflection, columns, and riveted, bolted, and welded joints. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

ETME 3303 Applied Thermal Science
Prerequisites: PHYS 1321 and ETME 2320. Basic thermal properties and heat transfer modes. Theory, operation, and selection of thermal industrial equipment including engines, turbines, boilers, furnaces, and heat exchangers. Two hours lecture, two hours lab. Three credit hours.

ETME 3305 Industrial Energy Utilization
Prerequisites: ETME 2317, 3303, and ECET 3308, or consent of instructor. Study of the efficient utilization of energy in manufacturing and industrial applications. Components of an energy conservation program, assessments of existing processes, analysis and application of energy conservation techniques. One hour lecture and five hours lab. Three credit hours.

ETME 3306 Solar Energy Systems
Prerequisite: a grade of C or greater in ETME 3303. Analysis of solar energy systems and methods of determining the capacity and functional requirements of system elements in terms of applications. Two hours lecture, two hours lab. Three credit hours.

ETME 3307 Applied Dynamics
Prerequisite: a grade of C or greater in ETME 2310. Topics include scalar treatment of kinematics and kinetics of particles, rigid bodies in planar motion, Newton’s laws, work and energy, impulse and momentum, impact, and vibration. Two hours lecture, two hours lab. Three credit hours.

ETME 3311 Mechanical Instrumentation
Prerequisites: ETME 3301, 3303, ECET 3308, and IFSC 1202, or consent of instructor. Measurement of mechanical phenomena including stress, strain, deflection, temperature, pressure, and flow. Automatic data acquisition and handling. Applications to process monitoring and product testing. Two hours lecture, three hours laboratory. Three credit hours.

ETME 3312 Production Systems
Prerequisites: ETME 2317, ETME 1300, or consent of instructor. Production systems and applications. System planning for products and services. Operational planning, Just-In-Time (JIT), Total Quality Management (TQM), process control, and system management. System analysis and computer simulation. Facility planning. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

ETME 3313 Tool Design
Prerequisites: grades of C or greater in ETME 2117, 2317, MATH1303. Optimum uses of tool function, geometry, design applications, cutting tools, gages, jigs and fixtures, punch press tools, plastic tools, and special production tools for N/C machines. Two hours lecture, three hours lab. Three credit hours.

ETME 3314 Metallurgy Applications
Prerequisite: a grade of C or greater in ETME 2302. Study of the principles relating crystalline structure to chemical, physical, and electrical properties of metals and alloys. The testing, heat treating, and engineering applications of ferrous and nonferrous alloys are considered. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

ETME 3315 Thermal Systems Design
Prerequisite: ETME 3303. Study of air conditioning, refrigeration, steam, fluid, thermal systems, and heat transfer processes for commercial and industrial applications. Emphasis is on systems design, operation, and component selection and specification. Two hours lecture, two hours lab. Three credit hours.

ETME 3317 Statics and Dynamics
Prerequisite or corequisite: MATH 1311. Engineering mechanics involving the study of both statics and dynamics. The equilibrium of bodies at rest or moving with constant velocity and bodies that have a change of motion. Three hours of lecture and lab. Two hours of lecture and two hours of lab. Three credit hours.

ETME 3318 Industrial and Environmental Safety
Prerequisites: grades of C or greater in ETME 2117, 2317, or consent of instructor. Need and justification for safety in the work place. Legal aspects of safety and the OSHA Act. Environmental requirements and emission standards. Scope of human factors and safety management. Planning and implementation of safety measures to counteract various industrial hazards such as mechanical, electrical, fire, noise, and toxic substance. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

ETME 3319 Plant Layout
Prerequisite: a grade of C or greater in ETME 2317. Principles of facilities planning as applied to selection and location of equipment. Batch and continuous flow. Two hours lecture, three hours lab. Three credit hours.

ETME 3322 Project Management
Prerequisite: MATH 1302. Study of project planning and scheduling using the network methods as presented by PERT and CPM. Network planning, solution methods, and practical applications. Probabilistic time estimates, resource leveling, cost optimization, and cost control techniques. Includes application of computer solution methods. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

ETME 3323 Materials Handling and Plant Layout
Prerequisite: grade of C or greater in ETME 2317. Production, distribution and service systems, material flow and the role of material handling. Material handling principles, analysis techniques, and equipment planning. Plant layout and design. The course includes the use of various case studies and the application of computer methods. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

ETME 3324 Plastics and Composites
Prerequisite: CHEM 1402 or consent of the instructor. Introduction to plastics part design, materials, production methods, tooling, and equipment. Process cost analysis and optimization. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

ETME 3328 Computer Aided Manufacturing (CAM)
Prerequisites: grades of C or greater in ETME 2303, 2333, and 2317. A study of the programming standards used in industry to control NC and CNC equipment. G and M codes, as well as specific control commands used in manual program. Computer aided design and manufacturing software to generate part geometry and tool path information. Preparation of final program used by the CNC controllers to machine the designed parts. Two hours lecture, three hours lab. Three credit hours.

ETME 3329 Process Planning
Prerequisites: grades of C or greater in ETME2117, 2317. Analytical models and techniques as applied to manufacturing processing, cost estimating, tooling, and materials selection. Problems involving manufacturing, planning, and control. Two hours lecture, three hours lab. Three credit hours.

ETME 3330 Quality Control
Prerequisites: grades of C or greater in ETME 2117, 2317; MATH 1302. Statistical foundation for modern quality control. Process control techniques and applications. Product specifications and process capability. Planning and application of acceptance sampling including such plans as the Dodge-Roming, military standards 105 and 414. Computer application problems. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

ETME 3361 Cost Analysis and Estimation
Prerequisite: ETME 3312. Cost estimation methods including labor, material, and overhead. Product, project, and system cost estimation. Estimate sensitivity and contract consideration. Cost-performance analysis and improvement techniques. Bench marking as means of gauging cost and quality performance. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

ETME 4185 Robotics Laboratory
Prerequisite or corequisite: a grade of C or greater in ETME 4385. Robot set-up and programming using control pendant, programmable controllers, ARMBASIC and AML2 languages. Robot capabilities including positioning accuracy, repeatability, and compliance. Robot manufacturing tasks including sorting, machine loading, and assembly. Vision system and applications. One three-hour lab. One credit hour.

ETME 4187 Senior Project I
Prerequisite: ETME 3301. Corequisite: ETME 4317. Product design/manufacturing cycle, The design process from market research through production and service, Concurrent engineering, design evaluation, and ethics in design and manufacturing, Project selection and planning for the second phase of the senior project to be completed in ETME 4387, One hour lecture, One hour lab. One credit hour.

ETME 4199 Special Technical Topics I
Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Designed to meet special needs of students or industry to cover application of technology to specific industrial problems. Meets equivalent of one hour. One credit hour.

ETME 4309 Production Control
Prerequisite: senior standing. Traditional operations research approach to production control and some of its limitations. Modern role of computer in material requirements planning (MRP). Master scheduling, capacity planning, dispatching, and shop floor control. Forecasting, order quantity planning and inventory management, Just-In-Time production. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

ETME 4317 Machine Design
Prerequisite: ETME 3301. Basic procedures of engineering machine design from concept to specifications. Material selection, tolerances, variable loads and stress concentrations, combined stresses, shaft design, couplings, bearings, gears, power transmitting elements, brakes, clutches, and welded joints. Emphasis on a logical procedure for the design of a complete machine, its components, their functions and layout. Two hours lecture, three hours lab. Three credit hours.

ETME 4319 Plant Engineering
Prerequisite: ETME 3315 or consent of instructor. A practicum on the design and operation of mechanical systems for commercial and industrial applications. Thermal processes, waste water, ducts, piping, and other mechanical systems. Plant operation and maintenance. Two hours lecture. Two hours lab. Three credit hours.

ETME 4321 Computer Aided Engineering (CAE)
Prerequisites: ETME 2333, and ETME 3301, or consent of instructor. Advanced computer aided analysis, stress analysis, kinematics, computer simulation, advanced design software and applications, project documentation. Two hours lecture, two hours lab. Three credit hours.

ETME 4383 Method-Time Analysis
Prerequisites: grades of C or greater in ETME 2117, 2317; senior standing. Design of work methods; time study, performance rating, work sampling and introduction to predetermined and computerized time-data systems. Applications to incentive plans and measured day work. Participative productivity improvement such as gain-sharing and quality circles. Two hours lecture, two hours lab. Three credit hours.

ETME 4384 Die Casting
Prerequisites: grades of C or greater in ETME 2317, 2302. Topics include heat flow, dimensional repeatability, metallurgy, molten metal systems, process control, cost estimating, operating the die casting machine, and safety. Two hours lecture, two hours lab. Three credit hours.

ETME 4385 Robotics and Automation
Prerequisites: ETME 3312; knowledge of computer programming or consent of instructor. Industrial robots, types, and method of control and programming. Automation and application to various industrial processes. Human factors considerations. Robot system planning and justification. Two hours lecture, two hours laboratory. Three credit hours.

ETME 4386 Maintenance Management
Planning, organization, measurement, and control of maintenance activities. The planning, acquisition, and control of replacement parts and maintenance of management information systems. Case studies and project work included. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

ETME 4387 Senior Project II
Prerequisites: ETME 3312, 4317, and 4187, or consent of instructor. Design problems obtained from industry, current applied research, or student’s own initiative are researched in advance, and assigned as senior projects. Problems are defined, analyzed, design solved, and a final report presented. Final reports include design calculations, drawings, production plans, and may, depending on the scope of the project, be demonstrated and tested using a prototype. One hour lecture and three hours lab. Three credit hours.

ETME 4388 Manufacturing Systems Design
Prerequisites: a grade of C or greater in ETME 4170, senior standing. Manufacturing problems obtained from actual industrial situations are assigned to senior students. Each problem is analyzed, designed, and presented orally and in a formal written report by the student. Student reports include drawings, manufacturing plans, cost, and schedule and may be demonstrated by a prototype whenever possible. One hour lecture, three hours lab. Three credit hours.

ETME 4399 Special Technical Topics III
Prerequisite: consent of instructor based on relevance of subject to student career goals. Designed to meet special needs of students or industry to cover application of technology to specific industrial problems. Three credit hours.

FINC – Finance

FINC 2300 Personal Finance
Personal financial planning, including bank deposits, savings accounts, life insurance, property and casualty insurance, retirement accounts, investment in stocks and bonds, housing. May not be taken for credit by business majors. Three credit hours.

FINC 3310 Business Finance
Prerequisites: ECON 2310, ECON 2322, ECON 2323, ACCT 2310, ACCT 2330. (May be taken concurrently with ECON 2323 and ACCT 2330.) Business finance with emphasis on the modern corporation; methods of securing and managing assets; problems of bankruptcy, reorganizations; business combination. Three credit hours.

FINC 3330 Principles of Insurance
The phenomena of risk and risk bearing, including insurance and other methods of handling risks; introduction to the areas of property, marine, liability, disability, life insurance, and fidelity and surety bonding. Three credit hours.

FINC 3340 Financial Markets and Institutions
Prerequisite: FINC 3310 with a grade of C or greater (may be taken concurrently). Examination and analysis of financial markets, such as savings institutions, banks, insurance companies, mutual funds, pension funds, and others. Three credit hours.

FINC 3350 Investment Analysis
Prerequisite: FINC 3310 with a grade of C or greater. Alternative investment opportunities, analysis of the economy, its industries, and particular businesses to determine the most desirable use of funds in terms of the objectives of individual and institutional investment programs. Three credit hours.

FINC 3370 Real Estate
Introduction to the real estate business; relationship of real estate to the national and local economies; legal instruments, appraisals, property sales, and management. Three credit hours.

FINC 4320 Bank Financial Management
Prerequisites: FINC 3310 with a grade of C or greater, FINC 3340. Analysis and management of the asset and liability portfolio of depository financial institutions. Three credit hours.

FINC 4330 International Finance
Prerequisite: FINC 3310 with a grade of C or greater. Multinational corporate finance; practices and problems in international finance; balance of payments and exchange problems; recent developments and trends in international finance. Three credit hours.

FINC 4340 Life Insurance
Development of the human life value concept and financial consequences of economic death; types of insurers; types of life insurance and annuity contracts and their uses; premium and reserve calculations; introduction to programming for individuals, families, and institutions. Three credit hours.

FINC 4341 Commercial Property and Liability Insurance
Prerequisite: FINC 3310. Students will learn about commercial insurance coverage and how the business of insurance is conducted in practice. Topics covered include: underwriting, sales, marketing, claims adjustment, and pricing of insurance. Three credit hours.

FINC 4355 Predictive Data Analysis
Prerequisites: Econ 2301 or Econ 2322, and Econ 3355. Students will apply analytical techniques informed by economic theory and probability theory to solve real-life practical problems taken from a diverse set of applications such as anticipating behavioral outcomes and estimating worst-case scenarios.

FINC 4360 Risk Management
Prerequisite: FINC 3310 with a grade of C or higher. Introduction to the fundamentals of risk management. Scope and fundamentals of property and liability insurance; analysis of contracts, rating, underwriting, insurers, and loss adjustments and procedures. Three credit hours.

FINC 4362 Derivatives
Prerequisite: FINC 3310 with a grade of C or higher. The cash, futures, and options markets for commodities and financial instruments will be examined. An economic perspective will be used to analyze the development, functions, and mechanics of these markets. The goal is to integrate an understanding of these markets into specific economic situations in order to improve the decision-making process Three credit hours.

FINC 4363 Financing Entrepreneurial Ventures
Prerequisites: FINC 3310 and MGMT 3300. Financing alternatives for new and growing ventures; debt financing from investment banks, commercial banks, and SBIC, as well as equity financing from angel investors, private placements, venture capitalists, and public equity markets. Students use firm valuation methods and calculate return to investors to create a capital plan for a growing enterprise. Three credit hours.

FINC 4364 Employee Benefits
Analysis of the nature of health and social insurance; causes, extent, and economic consequences of old-age dependency, unemployment, and disability; hospitalization and medical insurance, surgical benefits, major medical coverages, disability income contracts; review of Social Security and related social insurance programs. Three credit hours.

FINC 4365 Estate Planning
Importance of and techniques for risk identification and analysis as a basis for recognition of insurance requirements; application of coverages to business and personal needs. Three credit hours.

FINC 4366 Introduction to Actuarial Science
Prerequisite: FINC 4340. Introduction to the mathematics of insurance as the basis for rate making, reserve and cash value calculations, and underwriting; importance of correct actual practices to company solvency and liquidity. Three credit hours.

FINC 4368 Professional Financial Planning
Prerequisite: FINC 3310 with a grade of C or greater, and permission of instructor. Professional financial planning is the capstone course for the financial planning track of the Insurance and Financial Services major. The course covers all the significant aspects of financial planning, including; gathering data and determining goals and constraints, analyzing current financial status, and developing and presenting a financial plan. The course will include case studies.Three credit hours.

FINC 4371 Real Estate Finance and Investment
Prerequisite: FINC 3310, or FINC 3370, or consent of instructor. Elements of mortgage financing for housing and investment property; sources of funds; application and approval; real estate investment analysis; effects of financing and income taxation upon investment returns. A term project analyzing a proposed real estate investment is required. Three credit hours.

FINC 4372 Real Estate Valuation and Appraisal
Prerequisite: FINC 3370. Principles of valuation and appraisal of housing and investment property; market, replacement, and income approaches. A term project appraising an existing income property is required. Three credit hours.

FINC 4177, 4277, 4377 Independent Study in Real Estate
Prerequisites: consent of chairperson and instructor. Supervised independent study in a real estate area of particular interest to the student. No more than six credit hours of Independent Study in Real Estate may apply toward a degree. Credit to be determined at the beginning of the semester. One, two, or three credit hours.

FINC 4380 Portfolio Management
Prerequisites: FINC 3310 with a grade of C or greater, FINC 3350. Investment risks, returns, and requirements; portfolio policies for the individual and institutional investor; functions of the stock exchange, investment bankers, and brokers. Three credit hours.

FINC 4383 Applied Equity Analysis
Prerequisite: FINC 3350 for undergraduate or FINC 7320 for graduate credit, and consent of instructor. Using modern models of equity valuation, students analyze company and industry data, estimate fair value for equities, and then present their recommendations to a panel of industry experts. Once approved, the students’ equity selections will then be implemented in the Ford Investment Trust. Students must apply to enroll in this course; check with the department for application forms and deadlines. Enrollment is limited to 15 students, no more than 5 of whom may be graduate students. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as FINC 5383. Three credit hours.

FINC 4395 Advanced Financial Management
Prerequisites: Senior finance major with a grade of C or greater in FINC 3310, consent of chairperson and instructor. Sophisticated techniques of financial management. Application of the body of financial theory to specific problems. Three credit hours.

FINC 4396 Cooperative Education I
Prerequisites: senior standing, finance major, completion of at least 9 hours of upper level finance courses, cumulative GPA of 2.50, and consent of department chairperson prior to registration. Designated to complement and extend the classroom learning experience through the application of theories and concepts in a professional work environment. A written project, designed in consultation with the faculty member, and a minimum of 200 hours with a participating employer during the semester are required. The exact number of weekly work hours, activities, and responsibilities depend upon the nature of the work experience and must be specified in written agreements between the student, faculty member, and the Office of Cooperative Education. This course is accepted as elective credit in the finance major. Three credit hours.

FINC 4397 Seminar in Finance
Prerequisites: senior standing and consent of faculty teaching course. Advanced finance topics offered in a modular format and usually team taught. Topics come from both the corporate and investments areas and may vary according to need. Three credit hours.

FINC 4398 Teaching Internship
Prerequisite: consent of department chair and the supervising faculty. Working with individual faculty instructors, upperlevel majors assist students by holding review sessions twice a week for students enrolled in FINC 3310 and performing other supplemental teaching tasks as determined through consultation with the instructor. Unrestricted elective. Three credit hours.

FINC 4399 Independent Study
Prerequisites: senior standing, consent of chairperson and instructor. Research and independent investigation in specific areas of finance of interest to the student. Three credit hours.

FREN – French

FREN 1311 Elementary French I
A course for beginners with no knowledge of French. Instruction in correct pronunciation, aural comprehension, and simple speaking ability leading to active mastery of basic grammar and a limited reading ability. Three credit hours. (ACTS Course Number FREN 1013)

FREN 1312 Elementary French II
Prerequisite: FREN 1311 or equivalent. Continuation of FREN 1311. Three credit hours. (ACTS Course Number FREN 1023)

FREN 1315 Conversational French
Prerequisite: FREN 1312 or consent of instructor. A performance course with emphasis on elementary conversation and discussion. For students with a basic knowledge of French grammar. Three credit hours.

FREN 2311 Intermediate French
Prerequisite: FREN 1312 or equivalent. The intermediate course leads to greater facility in the spoken language and to more advanced reading skills. Three credit hours. (ACTS Course Number FREN 2013)

FREN 2315 Intermediate Conversational French
Prerequisite: FREN 2311. A performance course with emphasis on intermediate-level conversation and discussion. Three credit hours.

FREN 3115, 3116, 3117 Advanced Conversation
Special topics for discussion at an advanced level. Leads to expanded vocabulary mastery and greater fluency in the spoken idiom. May be taken one, two, or three hours per semester to a maximum of six hours.

FREN 3310 Integrated Skills I
Prerequisite: FREN 2311 or equivalent proficiency. An integrated approach to skill acquisition leading to intermediate-high proficiency. Within the rubric of communication, content focuses on the presentational mode. Three credit hours.

FREN 3311 Integrated Skills II
Prerequisite: FREN 2311 or equivalent proficiency. An integrated approach to skill acquisition leading to intermediate-high proficiency. Within the rubric of communication, content focuses on the interpersonal mode. Three credit hours.

FREN 3312 Integrated Skills III
Prerequisite: FREN 2311 or equivalent proficiency. An integrated approach to skill acquisition leading to intermediate-high proficiency. Within the rubric of communication, content focuses on the interpretive mode. Three credit hours.

FREN 3316 French Pronunciation
Prerequisite: FREN 2311 or consent of instructor. The sounds and phonetic symbols of the French language with reference to phrasing, stress, rhythm, and intonation. Three credit hours.

FREN 3321 French Short Stories
Prerequisite: FREN 2311 or consent of instructor. Reading and criticism of short stories by outstanding authors. Three credit hours.

FREN 3332 Introduction to French Literature
Prerequisite: FREN 2311. History of the literature from the end of the seventeenth century to the present. Three credit hours.

FREN 3333 Selected Readings in French Literature
Prerequisite: 3000-level French course or consent of instructor. Reading and discussion of selected works from French literature. Three credit hours.

FREN 3334 French Culture and Civilization I
Prerequisite: FREN 2311 or equivalent (may be corequisite with consent of the instructor). Historical, sociological, and cultural background of the French people. Three credit hours.

FREN 3335 French Culture and Civilization II
Prerequisite: FREN 2311 or equivalent. A continuation of FREN 3334. Three credit hours.

FREN 3336 Francophone Cultures
Prerequisite: FREN 2311 or equivalent proficiency. History and culture of francophone communities outside of metropolitan France, including French overseas departments (Martinique, Guadeloupe), the Maghreb, West Africa, and North America (Québec, Louisiana). Three credit hours.

FREN 4141, 4142, 4143 French Practicum
Prerequisite: FREN 3312 and two 3000-level French courses. Special problems in French syntax and stylistics. Offers students an opportunity to enrich and reinforce knowledge of syntax and stylistics for greater mastery in written communication. May be taken one hour per semester to a maximum of three hours.

FREN 4316 Advanced Listening and Pronunciation
Prerequisite: two 3000-level French courses. Advanced listening and pronunciation skills with reference to varieties of French spoken in the Francophone world. Three credit hours.

FREN 4331 Writings: Historical Perspective
Prerequisite: two 3000-level French courses. Reading and criticism of works of outstanding authors to the end of the 19th century. Three credit hours.

FREN 4341 Writings: Modern Perspective
Prerequisite: two 3000-level French courses. Reading and criticism of outstanding authors from the early 20th century to the present time. Three credit hours.

FREN 4350 Senior Project
Prerequisite: two 3000-level French courses. An independent project requiring research, oral presentation and written documentation under the guidance of French faculty. Topic must be approved prior to registration. Three credit hours.

FREN 4351 Cinema
Prerequisite: two 3000-level French courses. Viewing and discussion of French films including how French films both shape and reflect aspects of French cultural identity. Three credit hours.

FREN 4361, 4362 Seminar in French Literature
Prerequisite: two French literature courses or consent of instructor and two 3000-level French courses. Reading, discussion, and critical analysis of selected works from French literature. Three or two credit hours.

FREN 4101, 4201, 4301 Independent Study
Prerequisite: two 3000-level French courses and consent of the instructor. Reading from a selected bibliography of French authors. Credit is determined at the beginning of the course according to the problem and will not be altered. One, two, or three credit hours.

GEOG – Geography

GEOG 1311 Introduction to Physical Geography
Study of earth/sun relationships that produce the elements of weather, including temperature, precipitation, atmospheric pressure, and air circulation. Patterns of climate and their interrelationship with soil and vegetation systems. Study of major landform processes, which shape the earth’s surface, with specific reference to North America. Three credit hours.

GEOG 2310 World Regional Geography
World regional patterns of population, natural resources, and economic activities with reference to the nature of regions and their characteristics. Regional patterns of Europe, North America, Latin America, Africa, and East and South Asia. Three credit hours. (ACTS Course Number GEOG 2103)

GEOG 2312 Cultural Geography
The nature, distribution, and development of various cultural systems as they interact with each other and with their environment. A study is made of spatial patterns in the elements of culture, including population, religion, language, political ideology, economic activities, and settlement. Examination of the processes that have changed the natural landscape to a cultural landscape. Three credit hours. (ACTS Course Number GEOG 2113)

GEOG 3301 Geography of Europe
This course examines and analyzes the cultural and environmental geography of the European region. Topics include the geodemography of Europe with special attention placed on the challenges posed by low regional birth rates and high immigration, the opportunities and constraints associated with the uneven distribution of natural resources, and the paradox of ongoing regional integration and fragmentation in light of historical and contemporary geographic contexts. Three credit hours.

GEOG 3305 Environmental Conservation
Survey of the human environment with resources. Examination of major resources and their use with reference to North America and to Arkansas. Three credit hours.

GEOG 3307 Geography of Food
This course will focus on the importance of place and geography in the production, distribution and consumption of food. The role of culture and environment are critical in understanding why, what, how much, and where we eat. In the United States, we are increasingly removed from the farm and reliant upon processed foods, so understanding and appreciating the place of food becomes increasingly critical. Geographic concepts like nature-society relationships, spatial interconnections and patterns, and site and situation, will be applied to help us understand why food is produced and consumed where it is, by whom, and the changing nature of these relationships.

GEOG 3315 Geography of Arkansas
Study of Arkansas’ natural and cultural environments with emphasis on how various groups, past and present, interact with the state’s natural regions. Geologic, climate, soil, and vegetation patterns are examined. Settlement patterns; economic activities, including agriculture, forestry, mining, and industry; and population distributions are analyzed and placed together with the state’s natural regions. Three credit hours.

GEOG 3320 Urban Geography
Study of the urban landscape and the specific land uses found in United States cities. Current geographic pattern of industrial, commercial, residential, public, and recreational activities in our cities with reference to Arkansas. Three credit hours.

3333 Geospatial Technologies
Technologies This course is designed to introduce a range of spatially-oriented technologies. In this class you will learn about a variety of geotechnology and gain hands-on experience using it. Geotechnologies include the global positioning system (GPS), satellite imagery, and geographic information systems (GIS). Students will be exposed to practical applications of these technologies that span both physical and social science realms. Three credit hours.

GEOG 4321 Geomorphology
See ERSC 4321. Dual listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as GEOG 5321. Three credit hours.

GEOG 4300 Special Topics
Prerequisites: consent of instructor, nine hours of geography or an associated discipline that complements the seminar topic. Topics will be chosen on the basis of contemporary interest and demand and will be focused to provide an in?depth under-standing of the issue. Dual listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as GEOG 5300. Three credit hours.

GEOG 4311 History and Philosophy of Geography
Investigates the ways in which the subject of geography has been recognized, perceived, and evaluated, from its early acknowledgment in ancient Greece to its disciplined form in today’s world of shared ideas and mass communication. Includes an assessment of current geographic research. Three credit hours.

GEOG 4290, 4390 Independent Study
Prerequisites: 15 hours of geography including GEOG 1311, 2312, and consent of instructor. Research and reading in various areas of geography. Projects reflect student interest and career objectives along with departmental emphasis. Two or three credit hours.

GEOG 4397 Social Studies Teaching Applications
Social studies content linked with practical applications for classroom instruction. Content from history, geography, political science, sociology/anthropology, and psychology. Content modeled for prospective secondary education teachers to illustrate how content can be applied in the classroom. Critical components of each of the disciplines integrated into the content presentations and the demonstrated applications. Team taught. Three credit hours.

GERM – German

GERM 1111 Elementary German Laboratory I
Corequisite: GERM 1311. Supervised laboratory practice in listening, speaking, and aural comprehension of German. One credit hour.

GERM 1112 Elementary German Laboratory II
Prerequisite: GERM 1311 or equivalent. Corequisite: GERM 1312. Continuation of GERM 1111. One credit hour.

GERM 1115, 1215, 1315 Conversational German
Prerequisite: GERM 1312 or consent of instructor. A performance course with emphasis on elementary conversation and discussion. For students with a basic knowledge of German grammar. One, two, or three credit hours.

GERM 1301 Reading German
Essential grammar for reading German, with minor emphasis on pronunciation. Will not substitute for any other course in German. Three credit hours.

GERM 1311 Elementary German I
A course for beginners with no knowledge of German. Instruction in correct pronunciation, aural comprehension, and simple speaking ability. Three credit hours.(ACTS Course Number GERM 1013)

GERM 1312 Elementary German II
Prerequisite: GERM 1311 or equivalent. Practice in correct pronunciation, aural comprehension, and simple speaking ability leading to active mastery of basic grammar and a limited reading ability. Three credit hours.(ACTS Course Number GERM 1023)

GERM 2111 Intermediate German Laboratory I
Corequisite: GERM 2311. Supervised laboratory practice in listening, speaking and aural comprehension of German at an intermediate level. One credit hour.

GERM 2112 Intermediate German Laboratory II
Corequisite: GERM 2312. Continuation of GERM 2111. One credit hour.

GERM 2311 Intermediate German I
Prerequisite: GERM 1312 or equivalent. The intermediate course leads to greater facility in the spoken language and to more advanced reading skills. Three credit hours.(ACTS Course Number GERM 2013)

GERM 2312 Intermediate German II
Prerequisite: GERM 2311 or equivalent. Continuation of GERM 2311. Three credit hours.(ACTS Course Number GERM 2023)

GERM 2315 Intermediate German Conversation
Prerequisites: GERM 2311, 2312 or instructor’s consent. A course to practice oral skills on a wide range of topics. Students will learn how to narrate, describe, compare, and comment. Three credit hours.

GERM 2337 German Literature in Translation
The study and reading of representative works (in English) of German prose, poetry, and drama. Will not apply toward a major or minor in German. Three credit hours.

GERM 3115, 3116, 3117 Advanced German Conversation
Prerequisite: GERM 2315 or higher or consent of instructor. A course leading to greater fluency in oral skills. Students work toward oral proficiency through discussions on specialized topics. One credit hour.

GERM 3311 Advanced Composition and Conversation
Prerequisite: GERM 2312 or equivalent. Review of basic grammar and practice of oral and written skills. Three credit hours.

GERM 3312 Advanced Composition and Syntax
Prerequisite: GERM 2312 or equivalent. GERM 3311 is recommended. Grammar and syntax toward mastery of reading, writing, and speaking skills. Three credit hours.

GERM 3316 German Phonetics
Prerequisite: 2000-level German course. The sounds and phonetic symbols of the German language with reference to its history. Three credit hours.

GERM 3321 German Short Stories
Prerequisite: GERM 3312 or consent of instructor. Reading and criticism of short stories by outstanding authors. Three credit hours.

GERM 3332 Introduction to German Literature
Prerequisite: GERM 3312. Selected readings in German literature and brief history of the literature from the age of Goethe to the present. Three credit hours.

GERM 3333 Selected Readings in German Literature
Prerequisite: 3000-level German course or consent of instructor. Reading and discussion of selected works from German literature. Three credit hours.

GERM 3334 German Culture and Civilization
Prerequisite: GERM 2312 or the equivalent. Background studies for German literature. The social, intellectual, and cultural history of German-speaking countries as it applies to the study and teaching of German language and literature. Three credit hours.

GERM 4101, 4201, 4301 Independent Study
Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Reading from a selected bibliography of works in the field of Germanic languages and literature. Credit is determined at the beginning of the course according to the problem and will not be altered. One, two, or three credit hours.

GERM 4151, 4152, 4153 Senior Research Project
Prerequisite: senior standing. An independent research project completed over two semesters under guidance of a faculty supervisor whose field is related to the proposed area of investigation. The project has three components, consisting of a proposal (4151), a formal paper (4152), and an oral presentation (4153), each providing one hour of academic credit. A student may enroll in 4152 and 4153 only after completing 4151. Required for German studies majors. Three credit hours.

GERM 4161, 4261, 4361 Seminar: Special Topics
Prerequisite: six hours of upper-level German or consent of instructor. Reading, discussion, and critical analysis of selected materials from German speaking regions. Course content will change on demand. May be repeated for a maximum of six hours if topic changes. One, two, or three credit hours.

GERO – Gerontology

GERO 2300 Introduction to Aging and the Elderly
Prerequisites: RHET 1311 and 1312 or equivalents. SOCI 2300 or PSYC 2300 recommended. An overview of the aged as they relate to their social environment, with emphasis on the biological, psychological, and sociological aspects of aging. Three credit hours.

GERO 4310 Social Gerontology
This course explores the social aspects of aging – how do older adults affect society and how does society affect older adults? The interaction of older adults with society is examined along with many of our social institutions such as family, healthcare, government, and the economy. Also examined are the issues associated with our aging population and how those issues affect people of all ages. A number of current controversies associated with our changing population structure will be discussed in class. Three credit hours.

GERO 4315 Interdisciplinary Health Care of the Elderly
Designed to increase clinical knowledge, skills, and attitudes of students in the health professions and other fields related to health promotion and maintenance for the elderly. In-depth exploration of the multiple factors associated with the physiological process of aging, psychosocial developmental tasks, and typical environments of aged persons. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as GERO 5315. Three credit hours.

GERO 4336 The Social Aspects of Death and Dying
Gerontology and social work seek to apply knowledge from the social sciences, medicine, and the humanities with the skills and values of the helping professions. The multidisciplinary study of death (thanatology) itself comes out of studying these different disciplines. There are many social, psychological, philosophical, and religious theories concerning the passage of death—for both ourselves and those around us. We will study many diverse contributions in the social aspects of death and dying. Three credit hours.

GERO 4337 Adult Development and Aging
This course emphasizes the life course perspective as it looks at adult development and aging within the context of the social environment. Aspects of “successful aging” that will be examined cover growth and development from emerging adulthood to old age, and the impact that culture, gender, ethnicity, and individual differences have on these processes. Human development and aging is examined during early adulthood, middle adulthood, and late adulthood. We will study aspects of development that are common to persons at all ages across the life course, individual differences in development, and differences that characterize the separate age cohorts. Three credit hours.

GERO 4346 Family in Late Life
Prerequisite: GERO 2300. Family life of the elderly, including late-life marital relationships; widowhood and living alone; relations with children, grandchildren, siblings, and other kin; alternative and innovative lifestyles; family neglect and abuse of the elderly; and demographic and structural changes in the family and society that affect these matters. Exploration of dynamic and therapeutic models of family problems and process to provide a foundation of concepts for later training in counseling families with elderly members. The family as a natural support system for the elderly, along with the potential and limitations of such a system in a context of community support networks, will be core concepts. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as GERO 5346. Three credit hours.

GERO 4385 Topics Seminar
Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Special topics of critical and current interest to those interested and involved in the aging field. Topics range from Social Security, legislation affecting the elderly, and targeted programs to clinical and research developments in aging and life-span developmental issues. May be taken more than once under different topics. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as GERO 5385. Three credit hours.

GERO 4190, 4290, 4390 Directed Study
Prerequisites: junior or senior standing; GERO 2300 or consent of instructor. Study directed by a faculty member in a content area or competency relevant to research on aging or practical matters in connection with the elderly. May include field placement at an agency working with or for the elderly. Forty-five clock hours of study or of work on-site (in field placements) per credit hour is presumed. One, two, or three credit hours.

GNST – Gender Studies

GNST 2300 Introduction to Gender Studies
Recommended prerequisite: RHET 1311. A cross-cultural, interdisciplinary analysis of gender. Includes examination of gender identity, social roles, and cultural symbolism in politics, economics, family, health, socialization, religion, and language. Three credit hours.

GNST 3315 Gender Communication
See course description for SPCH 3315 Gender Communication.

GNST 3318 Sexuality, Society, and Culture
See course description for ANTH 3318 Sexuality, Society, and Culture.

GNST 3333 Women in a Changing Society
[See course description for SOCI 3333 Women in a Changing Society]

GNST 3340 Women in Literature
[See course description for ENGL 3340 Women in Literature]

GNST 3346 Sociology of the Family
[See course description for SOCI 3346 Sociology of the Family]

GNST 3350 Family Violence
[See course description for SOCI 3350 Family Violence]

GNST 3366 Psychology of Women
[See course description for PSYC 3366 Psychology of Women]

GNST 3388 Kinship and Descent
[See course description for ANTH 3388 Kinship and Descent]

GNST 4300 Gender Studies Senior Seminar
Prerequisite: GNST 2300. Taught on a rotating basis by gender studies faculty members in their area of specialization. Three credit hours.

GNST 4371 Women in World History
[See course description for HIST 4371 Women in World History]

GNST 4372 Perspectives on Women in American History
[See course description for HIST 4372 Perspectives on Women in American
History]

GNST 4190, 4290, 4390 Independent Study
Prerequisites: 15 hours of gender studies courses including GNST 2300 or consent of instructor. Selective reading and formal written project on a topic must be submitted by the student and approved by the coordinator before registration. Credit is determined at the beginning of the semester. One, two, or three credit hours.

GNST 4195, 4295, 4395 Internship
Prerequisites: 15 hours of gender studies courses including GNST 2300 or consent of director. Students are assigned an internship in the community. The objective is for students to apply theoretical perspectives to real world situations. Credit is determined at the beginning of the semester. Each hour of credit requires at least
30 hours of supervised work during the semester. One, two, or three credit hours.

HHPS – Health, Human Performance and Sport Management

HHPS 1101 Dieting and Weight Control
A practical short course designed to teach the proper methods of dieting and controlling body weight. Students will be taught how to determine, achieve, and maintain their correct body mass by using the scientific principles of proper nutrition and exercise. The futility of using drugs and fad diets to control weight will be explained. One credit hour.

HHPS 1102 Substance Abuse and Addiction
A practical short course designed to provide basic knowledge of drug abuse and addiction. Students will evaluate the role of drugs and other addictive behaviors in their life, and identify their risk factors for abuse or dependence. Students will be given information on available resources and options for behavior change and coping skills. One hours lecture/discussion per week. One credit hour.

HHPS 1103 Smoking Cessation
A practical short course designed to explore nicotine dependency/addiction and smoking cessation options. Based on assessment of individual tobacco use and knowledge of the advantages and disadvantages of smoking cessation options, students will plan and implement, if appropriate, a strategy for long term smoking cessation. One hour lecture/discussion per week. One credit hour.

HHPS 1104 Stress Management
A practical short course designed to assist the individual in identifying sources and situations that trigger reactions, both positive and negative, that display the physiological stress response. The individual will be taught how to identify stressors in their lives and explore possible ways of changing responses in order to develop satisfactory reactions to these stressors. The approach to this course is both personal and practical. One hour lecture/discussion. One credit hour.

HHPS 1170 Cardiopulmonary Respiration
Current lifesaving techniques used on individuals with heart or breathing emergencies. Appropriate first aid techniques also included. Two hours lecture/laboratory. One credit hour.

HHPS 1370 Personal Health
Designed to develop the understanding, attitudes, and practices which contribute to optimum physical, mental, and social well-being. Emphasis on major health problems and causes of death in various age groups. Three hours lecture per week. Three credit hours. (ACTS Course Number HEAL 1003)

HHPS 2303 The Theory and Practice of Health Education
Prerequisite: HHPS 1370 Personal Health or departmental approval. An introduction to the scientific basis for developing health education interventions from program assessment through program evaluation. History, theory, concepts and applications will be discussed. Issues related to the design of relevant, practical and effective health education programs will be considered. Three hours lecture per week. Three Credit hours.

HHPS 2330 Introduction to Sport Management
This course will provide an overview of all facets of sports including management, career opportunities, marketing and promotion, public relations, fund raising, economics and finance, legal and ethical issues, and event and facilities management. Three hours lecture per week. Three Credit hours.

HHPS 2372 Care and Prevention of Injuries
Care, prevention, and treatment of injuries to various parts of the body; taping and wrapping; laboratory practicum activities; exercise therapy techniques and basic understanding necessary to sound exercise programs. Three hours lecture/laboratory per week. Three credit hours.

HHPS 3195 Practicum in Health Education
Prerequisites: junior standing, consent of program coordinator. Directed observation and supervised field work in a health education professional setting. Emphasis on planning, conducting, and evaluating activities in the program. One credit hour for 30 clock hours. One credit hour.

HHPS 3196 Practicum in Exercise Science
Prerequisites: HHPS 2302, consent of program coordinator and instructor of HHPS 2302. Practicum students will administer physical fitness tests to those enrolled in HHPS 2302 at both the beginning and end of the semester. They will help prescribe exercise and be responsible for helping HHPS 2302 class members achieve their stated fitness goals. This aid will consist of advice and motivation, leadership of exercise groups, nutrition planning, and modification of exercise prescriptions where required. One credit hour for 30 clock hours. One credit hour.

HHPS 3210 Teaching Individual Sports
The course is an examination of the theory and practice of teaching and coaching: tennis and golf. Two hours lecture per week. Two credit hours.

HHPS 3211 Health and Safety in Early Childhood
A practical short course designed to provide an introductory experience to the basic concepts of health and safety in early childhood environments. Specific attention is given to recognition of common illnesses in young children, infection control practices, injury prevention, and basic emergency treatment procedures. Some of the regulations that guide health and safety practices in early educational environments will be examined. Two hours lecture per week. Two credit hours.

HHPS 3212 Teaching Individual Sports II
This course is an examination of the theory and practice of teaching/coaching Tumbling and Track. Two hours lecture per week. Two credit hours.

HHPS 3220 Teaching Team Sports
The course is an examination of the theory and practice of teaching and coaching: basketball, volleyball, and baseball. Two hours lecture per week. Two credit hours.

HHPS 3222 Teaching Team Sports II
This course is an examination of the theory and practice of teaching/coaching baseball/fast-pitch softball, soccer, and football. Two hours lecture per week. Two hour credit.

HHPS 3302 Exercise Physiology
Prerequisites: HHPS 3412 or department approval. The relationship between regular, moderate exercise and the resultant increase in the efficiency of the heart, lungs, and muscles. Students learn to assess fitness by the use of various laboratory instruments and techniques and to improve fitness by the judicious use of specific training programs. Two hours lecture, two hours laboratory. Three credit hours.

HHPS 3310 Coaching Theory and Methodology
Course is designed to improve the knowledge and understanding of methods and coaching theories. Students learn how to manage young athletes in conditioning, skill development, competition, motivation, and strategies. Three hours lecture per week. Three credit hours.

HHPS 3320 History of Physical Education
A study of the historical development of organized physical activity designed to improve the understanding and appreciation of the purpose, value, nature, scope, and significance of physical education throughout history. Three hours lecture per week. Three credit hours.

HHPS 3330 Teaching PK-6 Physical Education
This course is designed to help students understand the need for an effective pre kindergarten–6 physical education program. It will provide the prospective PK-6 school classroom teacher, as well as the PK-6 physical education specialist, with a knowledge base in the principles of physical fitness, elementary physical education curriculum planning and appropriate selection of physical activities for children. The students will be working with hands-on projects integrating the discipline of physical education and other curriculum subjects found in grades PK-6th. Proper nutrition for the elementary student will also be discussed. Three hours lecture per week. Three Credit hours.

HHPS 3331 Legal/Ethical Issues in Sport
Prerequisite: HHPS 2330. This course is designed to provide standard information on legal and ethical issues in the sport industry and the risk managers are responsible for. This course will focus on the three major areas of the law that have a direct impact on the management of sport: tort liability and risk management; contract law; and constitutional law. Identifying management strategies and education for proactive rather than reactive responses will be a major emphasis. Additionally, time will be spent investigating moral issues in sport, and judgments about right and wrong behavior among athletes, coaches, spectators, and others. Three hour lecture per week. Three credit hours.

HHPS 3332 Sport Facility and Management
Prerequisite: HHPS 2330. Sport and entertainment (amateur and professional) activities are held in facilities that create unique opportunities for the sport and entertainment business manager. This course offers a comprehensive look at the discipline of facility management and event planning/operations. Three hour lecture per week. Three credit hours.

HHPS 3333 Governance & Management of Sport
Prerequisite: HHPS 2330. This course is designed to familiarize students with the concepts of governance, policy, decision-making, organizational behavior, and human resource management in the sport context. Through various individual and group assignments, students will gain knowledge and develop skills relevant to becoming an effective sport administrator. Emphasis will be placed on learning the structure of common sport organizations at various levels (scholastic, recreational, amateur, professional and others) as well as organizational behavior theory and common human resource issues (staffing, performance appraisal and leadership). Three hours lecture per week. Three credit hours.

HHPS 3334 Sports Marketing Management
Prerequisite: HHPS 2330. This course investigates principles and processes in sport marketing and sales. Focuses on research and development, sport promotion, sport sponsorship, advertising, merchandising, and distribution of sporting goods. Three hours lecture per week. Three credit hours.

HHPS 3335 Sport Finance and Economics
Prerequisite: HHPS 2330. In this course, students will be introduced to current economic and financial issues confronting managers in the sport industry. Three hours lecture per week. Three credit hours.

HHPS 3372 Advanced First Aid
Training individuals to realize ethical and legal obligations in rendering competent first aid in case of accident or injury until a physician can be found. American Heart Association advanced first aid certification on successful completion of the course. Three hours lecture per week. Three credit hours.

HHPS 3374 Community Health Agencies
Principles and practices of public health and voluntary health programs and agencies. Students make guided observation in laboratory situations and engage in seminars. Three hours lecture per week. Three credit hours.

HHPS 3377 Drug Ed. K-12
An in-depth study of drug education designed to help teachers, administrators, and other special interest groups present drug education programs. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

HHPS 3391 Cooperative Education in Health Education
Prerequisites: junior standing, acceptance as a Health, Human
Performance & Sport Management major, minimum GPA of 2.50, and consent of program coordinator. Cooperative education seeks to integrate academic and professional work experiences. Students will be placed in a work setting consistent with their Health, Human Performance & Sport Management career objectives. This course requires a minimum of 200 semester work hours. Three credit hours.

HHPS 3401 Nutrition
Fundamental principles of human nutrition, nutritional value of foods, nutritional requirements of individuals at all ages, application of principles of nutrition under various physiological and economic conditions. Four hours lecture-demonstration per week. Four credit hours.

HHPS 3402 Structural Kinesiology
Prerequisites: HHPS 3412 or BIOL 1411 OR BIOL 1412 or equivalent or department approval. This course is a study of muscles, bones and joints as they are involved in the science of movement. Several physiological and mechanical principles are included to increase the understanding of the structures discussed in the course content. Four hours lecture-demonstration per week. Four credit hours.

HHPS 3410 Biomechanics of Human Movement
Prerequisites: HHPS 3402 and MATH 1302 or department approval. This course is intended to serve as an introduction to the biomechanics of human movement, including terminology and mechanical concepts using both quantitative and qualitative problems and applications. Three hours lecture and one hour lab per week. Four credit hours.

HHPS 3412 Applied Human Science
This course is designed to develop within the prospective health, physical education and wellness professional an understanding and applicable knowledge of the human organism. Those systems appropriate for understanding humans within the activity setting are emphasized such as the skeletal, muscular, nervous, circulatory, endocrine, and respiratory. Three hours lecture and one hour lab per week. Four credit hours.

HHPS 3422 Exercise, Wellness & Lifestyle
This course is designed to give the student an initial fitness assessment and exercise prescription experience. Basic concepts of assessment and principles of physical training will be covered. Students will implement an individual training program and demonstrate proficiency in assessment techniques of various skill and health-related fitness components. This course also requires students to actively participate in field work consisting of advice and motivation, leadership of exercise groups, nutrition planning, and modification of exercise prescriptions. Three hour lecture and one hour lab per week. Four credit hours.

HHPS 4340 Adapted Physical E. K-12
Course presents the philosophy and methods pertaining to the adaptation of physical education for handicapped and exceptional students. A basic knowledge of handicapped conditions and their complications for participating in physical education along with classroom, laboratory, and practical experience will be provided to increase the awareness of the handicapped and to facilitate the application of knowledge to real life situations. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as HHPS 5340. Three hours lecture per week. Three credit hours.

HHPS 4350 Methods and Techniques of Teaching Physical Education 6-12
Prerequisites: HHPS 3320, HHPS 3210, and HHPS 3310, or department approval. This course provides a detailed review of the analysis and application of the major responsibilities and competencies required for teaching physical education 6-12. Emphasis is on learning the State Standards for Physical Education, Wellness, & Leisure (SSPEWL) K-12 licensure requirements and preparation for the ETS PRAXIS Series exams. This is the designated capstone course for the BS in Health Human Performance and Sport Management: emphasis in Health and Exercise Science, Minor in Secondary Education. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as HSCI 5350. Three hours lecture per week. Three credits hours.

HHPS 4371 Health Education Concepts and Applications
Examination of the concepts, philosophy, and applications of health education in public, private, professional, and commercial organizations that exist to improve and maintain health. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as HHPS 5371. Three hours lecture per week. Three credit hours.

HHPS 4372 First Aid Instructor Training
Prerequisites: HHPS 3372, current American Red Cross first aid certification. Students under supervision develop a lesson plan, observe teachers, develop tests, and participate in the American Red Cross first aid program. Instructor training course for candidates to become certified by the American Red Cross to teach standard first aid and personal safety. Three hours lecture per week. Three credit hours.

HHPS 4373 Controversial Issues in Health Education
Designed to expand the health educators knowledge of health issues as they are influenced by laws, public opinion, and scientific knowledge; an in-depth study of current controversial issues in health education. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as HHPS 5373. Three hours lecture per week. Three credit hours.

HHPS 4374 Family Life and Sex Education
A study of dating, engagements, marriage, children, divorce, and sexual behavior patterns. Three hours lecture per week. Three credit hours.

HHPS 4376 Mental Health Education
Examination of methods to be used by teachers to develop the mental health of individual students. Emphasis on the health educator’s role in reducing mental and emotional problems. Three hours lecture per week. Three credit hours.

HHPS 4378 Organization and Administration of Health Education Programs
Prerequisites: HHPS 2303 and HHPS 4380 or department approval. This course is designed to provide a foundation in the organization and management of community-based health education programs. The purpose of this course is to provide an introduction to the fundamental concepts of management, administration and leadership; as well as, demonstrate their application in a variety of health education, health promotion and wellness programs. Dual listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as HHPS 5378. Three hours lecture per week. Three credits hours.

HHPS 4379 Methods and Techniques of Teaching Health Education
Prerequisite: HHPS 2303 or department approval This course will focus on basic philosophic structure of an efficient, meaningful, and effective application of health education, teaching methods, learning models and theories. Students will gain experience in the organization and planning of programs intended to motivate, sustain individual behavior, and change community attitudes and policies. Three hour lecture per week. Three hour credit.

HHPS 4380 Health Education Program Evaluation
Prerequisites: HHPS 4371 or department approval. This course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to learn about program evaluation and measurement concepts in health education and their application. Content includes: evaluation terminology, how to write measurable objectives, how to identify evidence based models, how to design and collect data using quantitative and qualitative methods, how to interpret data. Three hours lecture per week. Three credit hours.

HHPS 4381 Health, Human Performance & Sport Management Seminar
Prerequisites: HHPS 2303, HHPS 4371, HHPS 4373 or department approval. The course will emphasize the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing seven areas of responsibility. It is the designated capstone course for the emphasis area of Health Education and Promotion in the Department of Health Human Performance and Sport Management Bachelor of Science degree, and prepares students for the Certified Health Education Specialist exam. The course evaluation will incorporate a portfolio component that will consist of artifacts from the prerequisite courses. Three hours lecture per week. Three hours credit.

HHPS 4382 Cultural Competence in Health Education
This course is designed to increase knowledge and understanding of the importance of cultural competence in health education and community health promotion. Focus will be on culturally appropriate communication, health literacy minority health disparities, and effective strategies in planning, implementing, and evaluating culturally appropriate health education programs. Responsibilities of a certified health education specialist will be addressed.

HHPS 4384 Motor Development
Prerequisites: HHPS 3412 or department approval This course analyzes the basic concepts relating to human motor development. Basic research and relevant theories of general human development are discussed in relation to motor development and the learning of motor skills. The course provides an understanding of the motor development from early childhood through adulthood. Three hours per week lecture. Three hours credit.

HHPS 4391 Cooperative Education in Health Education
Prerequisites: junior standing, acceptance as a Health, Human Performance & Sport Management major, minimum GPA of 2.50, minimum of one semester of HHPS 3391, and consent of program coordinator. Cooperative education seeks to integrate academic and professional work experiences. Students will be placed in a work setting consistent with their Health, Human Performance & Sport Management career objectives. This course requires a minimum of 200 semester work hours. Three credit hours.

HHPS 4194, 4294, 4394 Workshop in Health Education
Provides opportunities for students, in-service teachers, and interested individuals to work and study with health education professionals. The student can expect to spend two to four hours per week (15 week semester) on the workshop for each hour of credit earned. The exact hourly commitment per week will depend on the nature of the workshop and will be specified in advance by the instructor. One, two, or three credit hours.

HHPS 4399 HHPS Special Topics
Prerequisite: HHPS 2330. Selected topics of current relevance reflecting interest in specialized areas of health education, human performance, and sport management. Course topics will be announced in advance. This is a 3 credit hour lecture course.

HHPS 4402 Fitness Management
Prerequisites: BIOL 1411, 1412, HHPS 3302 or the equivalents. This course is designed to train students in the theory and skills required for the administration of fitness programs in industry, YMCAs, rehabilitation clinics, and similar facilities. Emphasis will be on standards and guidelines for facility staffing, programming, and equipment. Overview and discussion of organizational structure, client screening, emergency/safety procedures, and legal issues. Two hours lecture and two hours of program/facility fieldwork per week. Four credit hours.

HHPS 4100-4600 Independent Study in Health Education
Prerequisite: consent of department chairperson. Provides an opportunity for advanced students to conduct an in-depth study in a specific area of interest or a special problem. May be taken for one to six credit hours. The student is expected to spend two to four hours per week on the project for each hour of credit earned. The exact hourly commitment per week will depend on the nature of the project and will be agreed on in advance by the student and instructor. One, two, three, four, five, or six credit hours.

HHPS 4695 Internship in Health Education
Prerequisites: senior standing, 3195, 3196, consent of program coordinator. Directed observation and supervised field work in a health education professional setting. Emphasis on administration, supervision, and program leadership in public, private, or voluntary health agencies, institutions, or business. Six hours credit for 200 clock hours. Six credit hours.

HIST – History

HIST 1311 History of Civilization I
Recommended prerequisite: RHET 1311. The history of the world’s significant civilizations from their beginnings to approximately AD 1600: the development of integrated political, social, economic, religious, intellectual, and artistic traditions and institutions within each of those cultures; significant intercultural exchanges. Three credit hours.(ACTS Course Number HIST 1113)

HIST 1312 History of Civilization II
Recommended prerequisite: RHET 1311. The history of the world’s significant civilizations since approximately AD 1600: examination of the persistence of traditional civilizations and the changes in the world order due to the development of modern industrial society, modern science, and the nation state. Three credit hours.(ACTS Course Number HIST 1123)

HIST 1314 First-Year Colloquium in History
This course introduces students to the discipline of history through examining of a single topic chosen by the professor. Students will also learn basic research skills, gain experience in time management, and carry out a long-term group project. Furthermore, students will use the insights gained in the classroom to engage with the community around them through a service-learning project. Three credit hours.

HIST 2311 U.S. History to 1877
Description, analysis, and explanation of the major political, social, economic and diplomatic events through “Reconstruction.” Special attention is devoted to the cross-cultural development of three civilizations, Native American, European, and African, within the geographical context of the North American continent. Major topics for study include European colonial empires; the American Revolution; the Constitution of 1787; evolution of a national government, federal in system and republican in form; social and economic theories and practices; relationship with foreign governments; and the American Civil War. Three credit hours.(ACTS Course Number HIST 2113)

HIST 2312 U.S. History since 1877
Description, analysis, and explanation of the political, social, economic and diplomatic events to the present time. Special attention is devoted to the forces of Modernity and the impact of cultural pluralism on traditional institutions. Major topics for study include industrialization; agrarianism; labor; immigration; reform movements; total and limited war; economic theory and practice; and the U.S.’s role in world affairs. Three credit hours.(ACTS Course Number HIST 2123)

HIST 3301 Ancient History and Thought
Social, intellectual, and cultural history of ancient Mesopotamian, Egyptian, Greek, and Roman peoples. Three credit hours.

HIST 3302 History of Ancient Greece
A political, constitutional, and social history of Greece from the Homeric Age to the fall of the Athenian Empire in 404 BC. Three credit hours.

HIST 3303 The Hellenistic Age
The study of Greek civilization from the fall of the Athenian Empire (404 BC) through the reign of Alexander the Great to the collapse of his successors’ kingdoms before the advance of Rome (c. 146 BC). Three credit hours.

HIST 3304 History of the Roman Republic
The history of the expansion of the city of Rome from a small village on the banks of the Tiber to a world empire. Three credit hours.

HIST 3305 The History of the Roman Empire
A history of the Roman Empire from the reign of Augustus and the rise of Christianity to the end of antiquity. Three credit hours.

HIST 3312 History of Medieval Civilization
A study of the interaction of the social class structure and Christianity in forming the institutions of medieval civilization (c. AD 1000-1350). Three credit hours.

HIST 3313 The Renaissance, 1300-1550
A study of urban and court life at the time of the Renaissance. Examines such themes as humanism, the arts, discovery, and gender issues in Italy and northern Europe. Three credit hours.

HIST 3315 Early Modern Europe, 1600-1815
Survey of major developments from the Thirty Years’ War through the French Revolution. Examines the role of international conflict, national state building, commercialization, the scientific revolution, and the enlightenment in the formation and disintegration of the Old Regime. Three credit hours.

HIST 3316 Europe in the Age of Revolution, 1789–1914
Survey of European history from the French Revolution to the outbreak of the First World War. Emphasis on revolutionary movements, nationalism, industrialization, class society, and imperialism. Three credit hours.

HIST 3317 Twentieth-Century Europe
World War I and its consequences; depression; totalitarianism; World War II; the reconstruction of Europe; the Cold War. Three credit hours.

HIST 3321 History of Britain to 1688
The period from the earliest times to the Glorious Revolution. Three credit hours.

HIST 3322 History of Britain since 1688
The period from the Glorious Revolution to the present. Three credit hours.

HIST 3323 British Empire
The political, social, and economic development of the British Empire, the foundations of the Commonwealth, and the emergence of the dominions and the dependent empire as autonomous units with the Commonwealth. Three credit hours.

HIST 3325 History of Russia to 1917
History of Russia from prehistoric origins through Kievan, Muscovite, and Tsarist periods with consideration of political, intellectual, economic, and religious factors. Emphasis on Tsarist policies. Three credit hours.

HIST 3326 The Soviet Union and Russia since 1917
Survey of major social, political, and cultural developments including the Russian Revolution, Stalinism, the Cold War, everyday life, the collapse of the Soviet Union, and the post-Soviet era. Three credit hours.

HIST 3328 Modern France
The French political community from the Old Regime to the Fifth Republic, with emphasis on the interrelationship of politics, class, and culture. Three credit hours.

HIST 3330 Early Modern Germany 1495–1806
Survey of the major social, political, and cultural developments in Germany from the Reformation to the French Revolution. Topics include political fragmentation and intra-German conflict, religious conflict, absolutism, the Enlightenment, the collapse of the Holy Roman Empire as well as everyday life, art, and literature. Three credit hours.

HIST 3331 Modern Germany since 1806
German history from the French Revolution to Re-Unification. Topics include nationalism and unification, revolutionary movements, industrialization and class society, Nazism and the Holocaust, post-war division, democratization and Europeanization, reunification, and the shifting nature of German identity. Three credit hours.

HIST 3336 Islam and the Modern Middle East
An examination of the role of Islam as the primary cohesive element in the social, political, and cultural development of the modern Middle East. Comparison and contrast of Western and Middle Eastern perspectives on relevant current issues. Same as RELS 3336. Three credit hours.

HIST 3341 East Asia Foundations: Culture & History to 1600
Development of the political, economic, social, and intellectual patterns within the East Asian cultural sphere from prehistory to the sixteenth century, with an emphasis on China and Japan. Three credit hours.

HIST 3342 Modern China
Early modern Chinese development, reaction to contacts with Western Civilization, continuity, modernity, and revolution from the sixteenth century to the present. Three credit hours.

HIST 3345 People’s Republic of China
The history of the origins of the Chinese Communist Party and of the development of China under Communist rule. Three credit hours.

HIST 3347 History of Japan
Development of the political, social, economic, and intellectual patterns of Japanese life from prehistory to the present. Three credit hours.

HIST 3351 Colonial America, 1607-1763
English settlements in the New World, the development of colonial society, American colonies, the British Empire. Three credit hours.

HIST 3352 American Revolution, 1763-1787
Colonial society in 1763, British imperial policy and the American response, the war for independence, effects of the Revolution on American ideas and institutions. Three credit hours.

HIST 3353 The New Republic: The US, 1787–1848
The formation of the Constitution, the emergence of American political institutions, economic and social development, and nationalism. Three credit hours.

HIST 3355 American Civil War and Reconstruction, 1848–1876
The origins of the American Civil War, its course, and subsequent efforts at reconciling North and South. Emphasis on the social, economic, and cultural background to the war and its impact on American society. Three credit hours.

HIST 3356 The Gilded Age: The US, 1876-1900
United States history from the end of Reconstruction through the presidential administration of William McKinley. The course emphasizes the changing character of America in this era, including the farmers’ revolt, industrialization, foreign affairs, and major social trends. Three credit hours.

HIST 3357 The Age of Reform: The US, 1900-1939
The political, economic, social, and diplomatic development of the United States between 1900 and 1939. Three credit hours.

HIST 3358 Recent America: The US, 1939-present
A history of the American people in recent times, including economic, social, and cultural developments as well as political, diplomatic, and military events. Three credit hours.

HIST 3371 History of Latin America: Colonial Period
Indian culture. Colonial European discovery, conquest, and colonial development; the Spanish colonial regime in the New World from 1492 to 1820; and wars of independence. Three credit hours.

HIST 3372 History of Latin America: Republican Period
Formation of the Latin American countries stressing political, economic, social, and cultural factors as well as the role of Latin America in world affairs. Three credit hours.

HIST 3375 Modern Mexican History
A study of political, social, and economic developments in Mexico since 1870. Industrialization, nationalism, foreign intervention, and multinational corporations as they relate to Mexican development and the 1910 Mexican Revolution. Three credit hours.

HIST 3380 The Indian in American History
A survey of red-white relations from first contacts through the creation of a reservation system in the 1800s and the removal of the Indians. Three credit hours.

HIST 4301 History of Technology
A survey of the role of technology from the Stone Age to the nuclear age. Three credit hours.

HIST 4302 Magic, Science, and the Occult from Antiquity to Newton
A survey of humans’ attempts to explain and control the cosmos from antiquity to the emergence of modern science around 1700, including the contributions of pseudo-scientific, occult, and magical world-views; internal developments in the history of science; and the relationship between scientific thought and the historical context. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as HIST 5302. Three credit hours.

HIST 4303 The Roman Revolution
This seminar will examine the fall of the Roman Republic and the rise of the Roman Empire. Students in this seminar are expected to acquire a reasonable mastery of major events and developments of this transitional period and to demonstrate at least adequate skill in written analysis of this material. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as HIST 5303. Three credit hours.

HIST 4304 Alexander the Great
This undergraduate/graduate seminar will examine the career of one of the most interesting and important figures in world history. Alexander expanded the domain of Greek civilization from the Mediterranean and Aegean Seas to the lands of Afghanistan and India. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as HIST 5304. Three credit hours.

HIST 4305 Environmental History
Study of humanity’s interrelationship with the natural environment throughout history, with emphasis on historical factors relating to current environmental problems. Three credit hours.

HIST 4306 History with Objects
Prerequisite: HIST 2311, 2312 or consent of instructor based on individual student need and ability. The role of objects in U.S. History including how different academic disciplines study artifacts; how to identify, authenticate, and evaluate artifacts (using decorative arts to learn visual literacy); and the impact of objects (especially their manufacturing and marketing) on American life. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as HIST 5306. Three credit hours.

HIST 4309 The Historian’s Craft
This course offers an introduction both to historical methods (how historians go about doing history) and to historiography (the study of the many ways in which historians have written about the past), through a focus on a single historical topic. Three credit hours.

HIST 4313 Apocalypse Now and Then: A History of Apocalyptic Thought and Movements
This course offers a history of beliefs about the end of the world in the western Judeo-Christian tradition. Through lectures and readings, we will examine such topics as the birth of apocalyptic thought, the medieval development of various aspects of traditions about the End (such as the figure of Antichrist and millenarian traditions), millennial influences on the discovery and colonization of the New World, millennial movements of the last two centuries (such as the Millerites and the Mormons), and contemporary apocalyptic scenarios. A major theme of the course will be the flexibility of apocalyptic language, its ability to interpret various historical situations, and its power to move people to acceptance or action. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as HIST 5313. Three credit hours.

HIST 4314 A History of the Future: Millennial Visions in Film and Literature
Examines past moments in which people take stock of the present by gazing into the future. Through literature and film, studies predictions of the future in their historical contexts. Looks at positive and negative views of the future, secular and religious predictions for humans’ fate. Dual-listed in UALR Graduate Catalog as HIST 5314. Three credit hours

HIST 4315 Religious History of the United States
Development of Protestantism including evangelicalism, new denominations, and fundamentalism; incorporation of Catholicism and Judaism into main stream; relationship between religion and social and political issues including church and state; minority religious beliefs and organizations; varying role of men and women in religious organizations. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as HIST 5315. Three credit hours.

HIST 4316 Ideology and Revolution in Eighteenth-Century Europe
The late eighteenth-century age of revolution and its background. The crisis of the Old Regime; the contributions of Jansenism, the Enlightenment, constitutionalism, and the politics of gender to the formation of a revolutionary ideology; the course of revolution during the last decade of the eighteenth century. Emphasis on France, but some attention to Britain, Germany, Italy, and America. Three credit hours.

HIST 4318 Modern Revolutions: From France to China
A comparative examination of five modern revolutions: the French Revolution (1789-1815), The Meiji “Restoration” in Japan (1853-1890), the Mexican Revolution (1910-1920), the Russian Revolution (1917-1932), and the Chinese Revolution (1919-1949). We will consider such issues as the extent of real turnover in the state apparatus, the prevalence of state-driven “revolutions from above” as opposed to classic “revolutions from below” in modern history, the balance of internal and external causation, and the nature of revolutionary violence. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as HIST 5318. Three credit hours.

HIST 4319 Military History of the Western World
A survey of military developments from the time of the Greeks until the end of World War II. The course investigates how internal institutions, international goals, organizational skills, leadership, and the application of technology by nations have affected the evolution of warfare in the West. These factors are examined to help students understand the nature of Western military systems and how they have been used as instruments of national policy. Three credit hours.

HIST 4322 Honors Thesis
In this course students will write a thesis, under the guidance of a thesis committee, based on research in primary sources. Prior to enrolling in the class a student must discuss possible topics with the faculty member(s) with whom s/he plans to work, and draft a thesis proposal. On acceptance of the thesis proposal, students will be cleared to enroll in the thesis class. Three credit hours.

HIST/ANTH 4324 The City
This interdisciplinary course focuses on “The City,” looking at the city through the lenses of anthropology, history, urban planning, geography, and the history of architecture. We will focus on the city in the imagination (the idea of the city), the city in space (urban designs and plans), and the city in time (the development of cities over the years). While readings and examples will range throughout history and across the globe, each of the three parts of the course will include an assignment looking specifically at our own urban laboratory: Little Rock.

HIST 4326 History of the Atlantic World
This course examines the processes which brought together the history of Europe, Africa, North America and South America across the Atlantic Ocean. Major themes include the Atlantic Ocean as frontier and zone of interaction as well as political, economic and social changes resulting from inter-Atlantic connections. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as HIST 5326. Three credit hours.

HIST 4327 Africa in World History
In this class we will examine Africa’s development from ancient times to the present. In particular we will explore Africa’s relationships with other areas of the world and discuss the points where the African experience converges and diverges from the experience of other regions. We will also focus on three forces driving Africa’s development: geographical contexts, economic systems, and cultural relationships. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as HIST 5327. Three credit hours.

HIST 4328 South Africa in World History
In this class we will examine South Africa’s development from the seventeenth century to the present. In particular we will explore how the geography of southern Africa shaped the emergence of a group of distinct cultures, and how the expansion of racial divisions influenced South African society. We will also focus on the forces of tradition and modernity in the new South Africa. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as HIST 5328. Three credit hours.

HIST 4329 Empires and Cultures, 1850-1914
In this class we will explore the intersection of empires and cultures in world history between the mid nineteenth century and the start of the first world war. We will read texts that describe the cultural encounter between imperial regimes and colonial cultures. These readings by both indigenous and European authors will let us ask questions and find answers to the issues surrounding the clash between empires and cultures in the late nineteenth century. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as HIST 5329. Three credit hours.

HIST 4333 European Social and Cultural History
Interdisciplinary survey of major European social and cultural developments from the Enlightenment to the present. Explores the interrelationship between a changing society and its beliefs; examines the political impact of modern ideologies, the sciences, and the arts. Three credit hours.

HIST 4335 History at the Movies
This course is designed to introduce students of the past to the potentials and pitfalls of film as a medium of historical exposition. Over the course of the twentieth century, the movies became a primary medium of artistic and commercial expression. The advent of commercial film-making in America also marked the first appearance of a particular “genre” of cinematic form-a “historical drama” was one of the first full-length feature films made in the United States, in 1915. Entitled Birth of a Nation, the movie purported to be a historical “facsimile” that chronicled the aftermath of the Civil War in the United States. Its commercial success guaranteed that movies with historical themes would continue to be made. Ever since, the makers of motion pictures have found the past to be a creative playground and a lucrative idiom. How do these movies relate to History? Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as HIST 5335. Three credit hours.

HIST 4338 Holocaust
The Holocaust as both a German and international event, with special emphasis on the role of the United States. Major topics include: the tradition of anti-Semitism and the rise of biological racism in the Western world; the Nazi seizure of power; the politics of immigration, especially in the United States; the planning and execution of the Final Solution; the complicity of non-Germans; Jewish and non-Jewish resistance; the mixed role of the Allied powers, especially the United States; the settling of accounts at Nuremberg; and the impact of the Holocaust on survivors and anti-Semitism in the United States.

HIST 4345 Chinese Film and History
This course looks at the traumatic twentieth century through the lenses of Chinese filmmakers, particularly focusing on how a century of revolution affected urban and rural areas, the roles of women, and the daily lives of people in general. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as HIST 5345. Three credit hours.

HIST 4350 The United States and the Middle East
The development of American foreign policy in the Middle East from 1900 to present. Students will gain an understanding of the critical factors that shape and influence contemporary US-Middle Eastern relations. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as HIST 5350. Three credit hours.

HIST 4352 The American West: Trans-Mississippi
A study of the westward expansion of the United States; United States penetration into the Trans-Mississippi River West after the Lewis and Clark expedition; social, political, and economic development; culture of the indigenous Indians of the northern and southern plains. Three credit hours.

HIST 4353 The Old South
The development of southern institutions and ideas from the colonial period through the Civil War. Three credit hours.

HIST 4354 The New South
Continuity and change within the southern states from Reconstruction to the present. Three credit hours.

HIST 4355 History of Arkansas
Focuses on selected topics central to Arkansas history, covering its political, social, cultural, geographic, and economic development from settlement to present. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as HIST 5355. Three credit hours.

HIST/RACE 4356 History of Race and Ethnicity in America
A survey of the history of race and ethnicity in the United States from prehistory to present with a special focus on selected topics in the experience of African Americans, Asian Americans, European Americans, Latino Americans, and Native Americans. Dual listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as HIST/RACE 5356. Three credit hours.

HIST 4358 Civil Rights since 1954
An examination of race relations in the United States from the landmark 1954 Brown v. Board of Education U.S. Supreme Court school desegregation decision to present, looking at among other topics the impact of the Civil Rights Movement, the Black Power Movement, Busing, and Affirmative Action. Dual listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as HIST 5358. Three credit hours.

HIST 4359 American Urban History
Beginnings and growth of urbanization in America from colonial times to the present. Emphasis on the economic base of urban expansion; development of urban policies, services, and municipal administration; the image of the city in popular thought; the impact of industrialization, transportation, population, and the frontier on urbanization. Three credit hours.

HIST 4363 Law in American History
The development of legal institutions in America from their English origins to the present. The rule of law, legal thought and the legal profession, the independent judiciary, civil rights, and the law’s role in economic development. Three credit hours.

HIST 4364 History of American Enterprise
The development of business enterprise in America from its roots in English colonialism through the advent of industrialism; the growth of commerce, the geopolitical foundations of a national marketplace, and the dawn of the corporate age; the relationship between property and the state, social values and the profit motive, innovation and economic advance. Three credit hours.

HIST 4365 Modern U.S. Culture
An examination of the historical development of mass culture in modern America. Concentration on the historical dimensions of culture and the ways in which Americans have redefined their values in response to technological and social change. It will explore the impact of various mechanisms through which a mass culture emerged, including movies, magazines, radio, television. Considers the relationship between culture and national character as currently debated by leading historians. Three credit hours.

HIST 4367 American Labor History
A study of American labor history from colonial times to the present; indentured servitude, slavery, sea-going and free labor, the impact of immigration and the introduction of the factory system, patterns of organization, mass production industries, automation, and the emergence of subsequent problems of the modern labor movement. Three credit hours.

HIST 4368 African American History to 1865
An overview of the African American experience from Slavery to Civil War and Emancipation, examining political, cultural, social, legal, constitutional, and economic developments. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as HIST 5368. Three credit hours.

HIST 4369 African American History Since 1865
An overview of the African American experience from Civil War and Emancipation through Reconstruction, the Age of Segregation, the Civil Rights Movement, and the Black Power Movement to present, examining political, cultural, social, legal, constitutional, and economic developments. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as HIST 5369. Three credit hours.

HIST 4371 Women in World History
An examination of the conditions of women in history with emphasis on problems in European history; attitudes toward women as reflected in religious, legal, and philosophical literature; and the role expectations of women in various societies. Three credit hours.

HIST 4372 Perspectives on Women in American History
Consideration of conditions and problems of women in American history from colonial to modern times with reference to European background and parallels when appropriate. Three credit hours.

HIST 4373 History of Family and Childhood in Modern Europe
The course introduces students to the history of childhood and family life in nineteenth and twentieth century Europe. Three credit hours.

HIST 4378 The History of U.S.-Latin American Relations
Survey of U.S.-Latin American relations from the pre-Columbian period to the present with emphasis on the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Focus on the diplomatic and economic relationships, including dollar diplomacy, intervention, dictatorship, and revolution. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as HIST 5378. Three credit hours.

HIST 4385 U.S. Diplomatic History
The origins, character, and consequences of United States foreign policy and its transformations through the nineteenth century, World War I, World War II, the Cold War, and the modern world. Three credit hours.

HIST 4390 Special Topics in History
Specialized study of selected topics in history. Course content changes each semester; refer to the semester class directory. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as HIST 5390. Three credit hours.

HIST 4391 Seminar in United States History
Prerequisites: HIST 2311, 2312, six hours of upper-level United States history. Advanced study of a topic in United States history chosen by instructor; includes a major research and writing project incorporating the department’s goals of identifying a problem; establishing a thesis; gathering, evaluating, and analyzing evidence; and writing in an appropriate scholarly format. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as HIST 5391. Three credit hours.

HIST 4393 Seminar in World History
Prerequisites: HIST 1311, 1312, three hours of upper-level non-US history. Advanced study of a topic in non-US history chosen by instructor; includes a major research and writing project incorporating the department’s goals of identifying a problem; establishing a thesis; gathering, evaluating, and analyzing evidence; and writing in an appropriate scholarly format. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as HIST 5393. Three credit hours.

HIST 4395 History Internship
Prerequisites: junior or senior standing, 15 credit hours of history. This course involves field experience with a history-related business or public agency. The student will work under the supervision of an individual at the internship agency and a member of the history faculty. The student must secure permission from both supervisors before registration. Three credit hours.

HIST 4396 Seminar in Arkansas History
Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Discussion, directed readings, research, and writing on selected issues. Topics will vary. May be repeated as topics vary for up to six credit hours. A major research and writing project incorporating the department’s goals of identifying a problem; establishing a thesis; gathering, evaluating, and analyzing evidence; and writing in an appropriate scholarly format, is required. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as HIST 5396. Three credit hours.

HIST 4397 Teaching Applications
The course links social studies content with practical applications for classroom instruction. The content information comes from history, geography, political science, sociology/anthropology, and psychology. This content is modeled for prospective secondary education teachers to illustrate how content can be applied in the classroom. The critical components of each of the disciplines will be integrated into the content presentations and the demonstrated applications. This course will be team taught. Same as GEOG 4397 and POLS 4397. Three credit hours.

HIST 4199, 4299, 4399 Independent Study
Prerequisites: senior standing, 15 credit hours of history. Open to history majors only. For students of superior ability who seek special research in the field. One, two, or three credit hours.

IDST – Interdisciplinary Studies

IDST 3310 Reasoning Across the Disciplines
Students will study interdisciplinary processes and concerns that apply to the liberal arts, including reading and thinking critically, making effective arguments, exploring research techniques, and writing effectively. Three credit hours.

IDST 4310 Interdisciplinary Studies Colloquium
A capstone course. Students will employ interdisciplinary methodology and critical thinking skills to examine and evaluate an interdisciplinary topic. The development and presentation of an interdisciplinary thesis/project will also be required. Three credit hours.

IBUS – International Business

IBUS 4314 International Business Strategy
Prerequisites: ECON 4320, FINC 4330, MGMT 4377, and MKTG 4320 or consent of the instructor. An integrated course that explores the key tasks facing international business managers including financial, managerial and marketing objectives and strategies. Heavy emphasis placed on decision-making and developing skills necessary for conduction international business. Course work will be project based and case analysis. Three credit hours.

IBUS 4316 Field Study in International Business
Prerequisite: Junior standing; repeatable subject to consent of International Business Program Coordinator. This course includes an international trip which provides students an opportunity to explore firsthand the international dimensions of business, to identify and pursue strategic issues in businesses, and to gain an awareness of how cultural, economic, political, and legal environments influence business practices. Prior to travel, students study and prepare reports on the country to be visited and upon return, prepare reports of their experiences, comparing pre- and post-visit perceptions. This course has a fee to cover travel costs and host institution charges. If course is repeated, travel must be to a different country. Three credit hours.

IBUS 4390 Cooperative Education
Prerequisite: 6 hours from ECON 4320, FINC 4330, IBUS 4316, MKTG 4320, MGMT 4377 and consent of the IBUS coordinator. Designed to complement and extend the classroom learning experiences through the application of theories and concepts in a professional work environment. A deliverable project, designed in consultation with a faculty member, and a minimum of 200 hours with a participating employer during the semester are required.

IFAS – Information Assurance

IFAS 2300 Introduction to Information Assurance
Prerequisite: RHET 1312. Study of information security for roles as security professionals and business decision-makers. This course addresses knowledge areas of the Certified Information Systems Security Professional (CISSP) certification, including need for security, legal and ethical issues, risk management, security technologies and tools, and personnel security maintenance. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

IFAS 3300 Computer Forensics
Prerequisite: IFAS 2300 and knowledge of Unix or Linux, as well as Windows operating systems. Study of the preservation, identification extraction, documentation, and interpretation of computer data following clear, well-defined methodologies and procedures. This course can be repeated for credit with a different theme. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

IFSC – Information Science

IFSC 1110 Introduction to Ethics
See PHIL 1110. One hour lecture per week. One credit hour.

IFSC 1202 Introduction to Object-oriented Technology
Prerequisite: Familiarity with using a desktop computer. An introduction to application development using Visual Studio with an emphasis on understanding graphical user interface design and object oriented technology. Topics covered include programming fundamentals (sequence, decision, and repetition), working with forms and controls, and manipulating user input and elementary database files. This is a laboratory computer-based course with hands-on exercises. Two hours lab per week per credit hour. Two credit hours.

IFSC 1105 First Year Experience for IFSC/CPSC Majors
A survey of the Computer and Information Science majors with coverage of Interpersonal and Team Communication skills, Time Management & Goal Setting, Techniques for Discovering, Organizing & Presenting Information, Self-Initiated Learning, and Overview of Campus-based resources. Activities include service learning projects, field trips, guest speakers, demonstrations, faculty presentations, and social networks. Two hours lab per week. One credit hour.

IFSC 1310 Internet Technologies
Prerequisite: Familiarity with using a desktop computer. This course is an introduction to Internet client-side technologies and standards-based web development. The course will be divided into sections covering the core components of any web site/page. Core components include Structure, Content, Design (presentation), and Behavior. Three lecture hours per week. Three credit hours.

IFSC 2200 Ethics in the Profession
This course is a survey of ethics and its applications to Engineering, Computing and Information Technology Professions. It has the twin objectives of (i) Studying professional code of ethics and the responsibilities that they place on technology professionals (ii) Investigating the background and implications of ethical concerns in the real-world professional environment. Two hours lecture per week. Two credit hours.

IFSC 2300 Object-oriented Technology
Prerequisites: IFSC 1202 or equivalent or consent of the instructor. Computer programming in Java. Language used to implement applications that employ objects and demonstrate software development by refinement and inheritance. Topics include data types, control structures, repetitive structures; data structures including arrays, lists, queues, stacks, and trees; recursion and File I/O. Two hours lecture and two hours lab per week. Three credit hours.

IFSC 2305 Computer Systems
Prerequisite: IFSC 1202 or equivalent or consent of the instructor. In-depth introduction to the components of a personal computer; topics include number systems, identification and organization of CPU, memory, and peripherals; cache technology; bus technology; upgrading, troubleshooting, and maintaining a personal computer. Incorporates hands-on laboratory experiences. Three hours lecture per week. Three credit hours.

IFSC 2315 Information Systems Software
Prerequisites: IFSC 2300 and 2305. Computer operating system concepts including processor and memory management, multiprocessing and multiprogramming, inter-process communication, scheduling, virtual memory, device management, input/output, secondary storage and file management, and protection. Three hours lecture per week. Three credit hours.

IFSC 2340 Human Computer Interface
Prerequisites: IFSC 1310 and 2300, or consent of instructor. In-depth study of building user interfaces; user requirements, design, aesthetics, and programming. Three hours lecture per week. Three credit hours.

IFSC 3300 Internet Applications
Prerequisite: IFSC 1310 or equivalent, or consent of Instructor. A hands-on course focusing on the technologies and concepts for creating dynamic and interactive web sites with a special emphasis on client-side technologies. Topics will cover techniques such as how to build efficient and dynamic interactive user interfaces, how to interface with data using standardized, portable formats, how to store/validate data and how to make data more accessible to other applications. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

IFSC 3315 Applied Networking
Prerequisite: IFSC 2300 or equivalent or consent of instructor. Networking Concepts with emphasis on the Internet. The OSI and Internet layering conventions are studied to cover the operation of an application system with imbedded network components. End-to-End protocols, Encryption, and Firewalls are considered as components of a complete system with individual contributions to overall system performance. Lab experiments using current generation networking equipment illustrate the networking concepts. Two hours lecture and two hours lab per week. Three credit hours.

IFSC 3320 Database Concepts
Prerequisites: junior standing or consent of the instructor. Offers an introduction to the fundamentals and use of relational databases and focuses on four major topics: ER-diagram, relational algebra, SQL language and Oracle. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

IFSC 3330 Current Trends in Database Technology
Prerequisite: IFSC 3320 or equivalent or consent of the instructor. Current trends in database design and management emphasizing typical applications in business, medicine, and science. Survey of modern database technologies including object-related database technology, query processing and optimization, transaction processing concepts, concurrency control techniques, database security and authorization, data mining, data warehousing, and web search engine technology. Discussion of database management and distributed database management issues. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

IFSC 3342 Mobile Web Development
Prerequisite: IFSC 1310 or Instructor Approval. This course will take an in-depth look at modem web technologies used in the creation of standards-based websites for use on desktop and mobile devices. We will evaluate and test many approaches in an effort to establish maintainable work-flows and create highly usable sites using a “Mobile First” design philosophy. In addition, this course will explore various tools for testing, versioning and distributing project assets. 2 Hours Lecture I I Hour Lab. Total 3 Credit Hours.

IFSC 3360 System Analysis and Design
Prerequisite: IFSC 2300 or equivalent or consent of the instructor. Fundamental concepts of object-oriented software analysis and design including requirements specification, analysis, and design of software; issues in software reuse, software packaging, and software management. Three hours lecture per week. Three credit hours.

IFSC 3391 Junior Cooperative Education I
Prerequisites: Junior standing in information science or completion of the Information Technology Minor. This course may be substituted for a major elective with the consent of the chairperson. Work experience to complement and extend the classroom experience through the application of a student’s academic experiences in a professional information technology environment. A minimum of 200 hours of work with the participating employer is required. The exact number of hours per week, activities, and responsibilities are dependent on the nature of the work experience and must be specified in written agreements coordinated with the UALR Office of Cooperative Education. Three credit hours.

IFSC 3392 Junior Cooperative Education II
Prerequisites: Junior standing in information science or completion of the Information Technology Minor. This course is designed as a continuing cooperative learning experience beyond IFSC 3391 and may be substituted for a major elective with the consent of the chairperson. Work experience to complement and extend the classroom experience through the application of a student’s academic experiences in a professional information technology environment. A minimum of 200 hours of work with the participating employer is required. The exact number of hours per week, activities, and responsibilities are dependent on the nature of the work experience and must be specified in written agreements coordinated with the UALR Office of Cooperative Education. Three credit hours.

IFSC 4301 Information, Computing, and the Future
Topics on information and computing and their interactions with society. Emphasizes the history and present status of information and computing technologies and their implications for possible future changes in the profession, the field, and society. Includes discussion of change as a factor in personal career preparation, goals, and activities. Topics may vary based on student interest and current events. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

IFSC 4325 Data Mining Concepts and Techniques
Prerequisite: IFSC 3320 or equivalent or consent of the instructor. In-depth, practical coverage of essential data mining topics, including OLAP and data warehousing, data pre-processing, concept description, association rules, classification and prediction, and cluster analysis. Advanced topics include mining object-relational databases, spatial databases, multimedia databases, time-series databases, text databases, the World Wide Web, and applications in several fields. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

IFSC 4330 Database Security
Prerequisite: IFSC 3330 or equivalent or consent of the instructor. Focus on security issues in databases systems and introduction of how current and future commercial systems may be designed to ensure secrecy and confidentiality. Topics include security models, basic security mechanisms and software, statistical database security, intrusion detection, security models for next generation databases, tested techniques and proven strategies for securing an Oracle environment — from the operating system to the database to the network, and how to implement security using Oracle’s built-in tools. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

IFSC 4339 Network Security
Prerequisite: IFSC 3315 or CPSC 4384 or SYEN 3332 or MGMT 4310, or consent of instructor. This course provides students with a concise and in-depth overview of security issues in current computer networks. It first gives a brief introduction of cryptographic algorithms and protocols underlying network security applications, including encryption, hash function, public key algorithm, digital signatures, and key exchanges. Then, it focuses on the security issues in current computer networks as well as network security tools and applications. The course will cover network intrusion/detection techniques and systems. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

IFSC 4345 Information Visualization
Prerequisites: MATH 1451 and IFSC 2300, or consent of the instructor. The design and presentation of information. Use of graphics, animation, sound, visualization software, and hypermedia in helping users understand information. Methods of presenting complex information to enhance comprehension and analysis. Incorporation of visualization techniques into human-computer interfaces. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

IFSC 4350 Electronic Commerce
Prerequisite: IFSC 1310 or equivalent and senior standing or consent of instructor. Seminar style course designed for student to be able to describe and apply different electronic commerce business models. Understand technologies in electronic commerce, including the internet and WWW, security systems, electronic payment systems, and intelligent agents. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

IFSC 4360 Social Computing
Prerequisite: IFSC 1310 and IFSC 2300, or equivalent, or consent of Instructor. A hands-on course focusing on concepts of the social and information networks, Web as graph, models (such as Power law distribution, scale-free models, preferential attachment models, etc.) that simulate behavioral characteristics of these graphs, basic graph theoretical concepts, characteristics of social media and Web 2.0 or the Social Web (such as blogs, microblogging, social friendship networks, social bookmarking, social news, social media sharing, wikis, etc.), understanding and developing API and mashups, issues and challenges in data crawling and web analytics, network data visualization, exposure to information extraction and retrieval concepts aiming at the highly dynamic and noisy nature of social media, harnessing the collective and web intelligence, and basic concepts of cloud computing. Three lecture hours. Three credit hours.

IFSC 4376 Applied Cryptography
See CPSC 4376 Applied Cryptography Three credit hours.

IFSC 4391 Senior Cooperative Education I
Prerequisites: Senior standing in information science and consent of chairperson if substituted for a major elective. Work experience to complement and extend the classroom experience through the application of a student’s academic experiences in information science in a professional information technology environment. A minimum of 200 hours of work with the participating employer is required. The exact number of hours per week, activities, and responsibilities are dependent on the nature of the work experience and must be specified in written agreements coordinated with the UALR Office of Cooperative Education. Three credit hours.

IFSC 4392 Senior Cooperative Education II
Prerequisites: Senior standing in information science and consent of chairperson if substituted for a major elective. This course is designed as a continuing cooperative learning experience beyond IFSC 4391. Work experience to complement and extend the classroom experience through the application of a student’s academic experiences in information science in a professional information technology environment. A minimum of 200 hours of work with the participating employer is required. The exact number of hours per week, activities, and responsibilities are dependent on the nature of the work experience and must be specified in written agreements coordinated with the UALR Office of Cooperative Education. Three credit hours.

IFSC 4395, 4695 Internship
Prerequisite: junior or senior standing in information science and consent of the chairperson if substituted for a major elective. Professional experience related to the student’s major emphasis under supervision of an advisor. A minimum of four hours work on site per week for each credit hour. Advisor files a grade contract with the chairperson. Three or six credit hours.

IFSC 4396 Capstone Project I
Prerequisite: IFSC 3330 and 3360. Capstone course in which student teams do an analysis of a live information system, document and present their conclusions. Projects are chosen at the end of IFSC 3330. Teams coordinate their efforts on a sponsor’s site and make regular report to the instructor. Classroom meetings are held as necessary to conduct orientations and hear presentations. Three credit hours.

IFSC 4398 Capstone Project II
Prerequisite: IFSC 4396. Continued capstone course in which student teams pursue the design and implementation of system improvements identified in IFSC 4396. Deliverables and schedule are determined by the instructor. Classroom meetings are held as necessary to conduct orientations and hear presentations. Three credit hours.

IFSC 4100, 4200, 4300, 4400, 4500, 4600 Independent Study
Prerequisite: consent of chairperson. Individual research by the advanced student. Topics determined on the basis of faculty interest and availability. Two to four hours per week per credit hour. the exact time and nature of the experience depends on the subject matter and is agreed upon at the beginning of the term by the student and the instructor. Agreement must be in writing and filed with the chairperson. May be repeated. Maximum of six credit hours can be applied toward IFSC major requirements. One, two, three, four, five, or six credit hours.

IFSC 4199, 4299, 4399, 4499 Special Topics
Prerequisite: junior standing or consent of instructor. Advanced, specialized topics of current interest in information science. May be repeated up to a maximum of 12 credit hours counting toward the major. One, two, three, or four hours lecture or equivalent per week. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as IFCI 5199, 5299, 5399, 5499. One, two, three, or four credit hours.

INTR – Interpreting For The Deaf

INTR 1320 American Sign Language I
A web enhanced elementary course in American Sign Language (ASL) using a natural language approach to introduce culturally appropriate signed concepts related to the immediate environment. Common communicative events and interactions are utilized to acquire a basic working vocabulary and grammar. Includes development of appropriate linguistic/cultural behaviors and awareness of/and respect for Deaf Culture. Receptive and expressive skills are fostered through interactive ASL lessons without voice. Three credit hours.

INTR 1321 American Sign Language II
Prerequisite: INTR 1320 with a grade of C or greater. An intermediate ASL course progressing from common, concrete communicative events and interactions to language usage expressing abstract ideas. Emphasis is on the comprehension and production of increasingly complex linguistic structure focusing on dialogues and conversational expressions. More complex receptive and expressive skills are fostered through interactive ASL lessons without voice. Three credit hours.

INTR 1340 Deaf Culture
An interdisciplinary study of American Deaf culture and the factors that contribute to defining the Deaf Community as a cultural minority, focusing on an awareness and understanding of cultural diversity and preservation of language. Covers the cultural identity, group norms, rules of social interaction, values, and traditions held by members who are deaf. Societal attitudes regarding deafness and issues such as cultural oppression and language power by the majority culture will be discussed, as well as the contributions of folklore, literature, plays and works of art made by persons who are deaf to the larger American culture and to their own community organizations. The impact of modern technology, emerging issues, trends, and advocacy with the Deaf Community are presented. Three credit hours.

INTR 2240 Specialized Terminology

Prerequisite: Interpretation 2320, or permission of program coordinator. Students will acquire skills and vocabulary for interpreting in specialized settings such as medical, mental health, legal, rehabilitation, counseling, technical and religious fields. Emphasis is on acquisition of specific terminology, concepts and protocol in each area. Two credit hours.

INTR 2280 Fingerspelling

Prerequisite: INTR 1320. A course designed to develop expressive and receptive fingerspelling skills. Emphasis will be on whole-word and phrase recognition, as well as on reading fingerspelling embedded in signed sentences. Expressive skills will focus on attainment of normal speed, clarity, and fluency. Extensive interaction and drills with the instructor-student(s) will enhance receptive and expressive speed and skill. Videotaped fingerspelling lessons of varying speeds embedded in sentences will be utilized for practice of receptive comprehension. Two credit hour

INTR 2320 American Sign Language III
Prerequisite: INTR 1321 with a grade of C or greater. This course is a continuation of the Signing Naturally curriculum. Emphasis is on the development of fluent conversational skills utilizing grammatical non-manual signals and markers. Students will learn how to narrate, describe, compare, and comment. Videotaped narratives of native language users are utilized to build students’ comprehension skills and to review language features taught in class. Interactive ASL lessons without voice lead to expanded vocabulary mastery and fluency. Three credit hours.

INTR 2321 American Sign Language IV

Prerequisite: INTR 2320 with a grade of C or greater. An advanced ASL performance course integrating cultural and linguistic competencies ranging from informal to formal communication events. Emphasis is on greater fluency in idiomatic language usage and mastery of vocabulary and syntax. Linguistic competence is enhanced through interactive discourse with native language users. Three credit hours.

INTR 2330 Manually Coded English in Educational Settings
Prerequisite: INTR 1321. Designed to expose students to a variety of signed English systems. Students learn the rules governing the selection of signs and the rationale for sign language systems in the educational setting. Focus is on learning Signing Exact English (SEE II) as adopted by educational systems and state schools for the deaf. Three credit hours.

INTR 2344 Comparative Linguistics: ASL and English
Prerequisite: INTR 2320, 2330. This course introduces students to the basic concepts of linguistics: phonology, morphology, syntax, and language use. Students will compare and contrast the fundamental linguistic structures of American Sign Language and English and learn to think critically about languages and language use. Three credit hours.

INTR 3320 American Sign Language V
Prerequisite: The completion of an Associate of Science in American Sign Language Studies, and an Intermediate level on the Signed Communication Proficiency Interview (SCPI). Corequisite: INTR 3344. This is an advanced ASL performance course integrating cultural and linguistic competencies ranging from informal to formal communication. Emphasis is on fluency in idiomatic language usage and mastery of vocabulary and syntax. Linguistic competence is enhanced through interactive discourse with native language users.

INTR 3344 Interpretation Theory and Process
Prerequisite: INTR 2342. Corequisite: INTR 2321. This course uses a process-oriented approach to applying the essential cognitive strategies to interpretation. These strategies include organizing and manipulating visual images, analyzing message for meaning, and self-monitoring for message accuracy. The course serves as a transition from language learning to beginning interpretation from American Sign Language to English. Three credit hours.

INTR 3347 Introduction to Interpreting
Prerequisites: The completion of an Associate of Science in American Sign Language Studies. Designed to provide students with a working knowledge of the profession of interpreting, including the Code of Professional Conduct, certification criteria, the roles and responsibilities of an interpreter, and compensation. Discussions of the role of the interpreter in a variety of professional settings including educational, medical, legal, rehabilitation and mental health. Three credit hours.

INTR 3350 Artistic Interpreting in Educational Settings
Prerequisite: INTR 1321. Designed to teach students the skills needed to interpret music, prose, poetry, and drama in a visually artistic manner. Emphasizes appropriate use of conceptually accurate signs, facial expression, movement, and rhythm. Three credit hours.

INTR 3364 Sign to Voice Interpreting/Transliterating
Prerequisites: Interpretation 3320, 3344, 3346. Designed to develop skills in sign to voice interpreting for persons who are deaf. Students will learn to voice simultaneously and consecutively when viewing videotapes of native signers who use a variety of signing modalities to communicate. Audiotapes provide students with immediate feedback. Three credit hours.

INTR 3366 Voice to Sign Interpreting/Transliterating
Prerequisites: INTR 3320, INTR 3344 and INTR 3346. Designed to develop interpreting and transliterating skills through the use of interactive videotapes and audiotapes. Students also will learn to select and assess appropriate modality and language levels. Emphasis will be on the process of interpreting and developing fluency, speed, and accuracy. Three credit hours.

INTR 3372 Interpreting for Persons who are Hard of Hearing
Prerequisite: INTR 3346. A study of the mechanics of and skills needed for interpreting for persons who are deaf and hard of hearing and use assistive listening technology, oral transliterating, Cued Speech, or speech to text services. Students will develop and practice appropriate techniques necessary for interpreting for persons who are deaf and hard of hearing, who do not know sign language and who use the above methods for communication. Three credit hours.

INTR 3380 Introduction to Interpreting Research
Prerequisite: INTR 2350, INTR 2344, or permission of the program coordinator. This course is designed to introduce students to the process of conducting research, quantitative and qualitative methods of data collection and analysis, and the process of reporting research results. Students will learn ethical practices in the conduct of research. Students will critically evaluate research in the fields of sign language linguistics and spoken and sign language interpreting research. Three credit hours.

INTR 4102, 4202, 4302 Workshop
Special topics. One, two, or three credit hours.

INTR 4108, 4208, 4308 Independent Study
Prerequisite: consent of coordinator. Special topics. One, two, or three credit hours.

INTR 4330 Interpreting I
Prerequisite: The completion of INTR 3364, 3366, QAST Level I/I or equivalent interpreting credential. This course is an intermediate level interpreting skills course designed to enhance both linguistic competencies and interpreting skills. This course is divided into four 3-week blocks with each block focusing on a specific topic/setting. Business practices regarding self-employment and record keeping will be infused into each learning block. Students will practice specialized vocabulary, participate in simulated interpreting experiences, apply ethical decision making, tour environments and interact with professionals from targeted settings: medical, video relay/employment, social services, religious and business. Three credit hours.

INTR 4332 Interpreting II
Prerequisite: INTR 4330, INTR 4370. This course is an advanced level interpreting skills course designed to enhance both linguistic competencies and interpreting skills. This course is divided into four 3-week blocks with each block focusing on a specific topic/setting. Business practices regarding self-employment and record keeping will be in fused into each learning block. Students will practice specialized vocabulary, participate in simulated interpreting experiences, apply ethical decision making, tour environments and interact with professionals from targeted settings: video relay and video remote interpreting, government agencies, mental health and legal.

INTR 4346 Principles of Educational Interpreting
Prerequisite: Interpretation 3380, QAST Level I/I or equivalent, or permission of program coordinator. Issues related to interpreting in classrooms at the elementary, secondary, and postsecondary levels. Students will analyze the major transitions from childhood to adolescence to adulthood and the changes required in professional roles, responsibilities, and ethical decision-making. Topics will include: working with children and adolescents, their parents, and educators; sign systems used in educational settings; educational goals and language policies; certification issues; working conditions; analyzing classroom interpreting tasks; and knowledge, skills, and attitudes needed for educational interpreting. Three credit hours.

INTR 4358 Interpreting for Persons who are Deaf-Blind
Prerequisites: INTR 3364, INTR 3366, QAST I/I or equivalent. Students will study the major causes of deaf-blindness and the impact of deaf-blindness on communication, mobility and life styles. Emphasis is on learning and practicing the various modes of communication used by persons who are deaf-blind for interpreters and intervenors. Students will become familiar with human guide techniques and the aids and devices available to persons who are deaf-blind. Tactile forms of communication will be emphasized during role play situations. A service-learning component will provide the opportunity to apply classroom knowledge and skills in real life situations, while meeting community need. Reflective discussion and writing is emphasized throughout the course. Three credit hours.

INTR 4370 Ethical Standards for Interpreters
Prerequisites: fNTR 3364, 3366 and QAST Level l/1, or permission of program coordinator. A course designed to teach and practice a model for ethical decision making within the field of interpretation. Students will study codes from international interpreting organizations, the NAD-RlD Code of Professional Conduct, the QAST Code of Ethics, and the Arkansas Code for interpreters in the judiciary. The RlD Ethical Practices System will be reviewed. Various interpreting scenarios presenting ethical dilemmas will be discussed and/or role-played applying the Humphrey/Alcorn Decision-Making Model to the NAD-RID Code of Professional Conduct. Three credit hours.

INTR 4380 Advanced Transliteration: English – English
Prerequisites: INTR 4330, 4370, QAST Level I/I or equivalent, or permission of program coordinator. Corequisite: INTR 4382. Restricted to students who have been admitted to the Interpretation program. Continuation of sign to voice and voice to sign transliterating skills development. Course includes practice in appropriate sign/spoken vocabulary selection, the matching or register in the formal setting, and quality voice production. Students will focus on transliterating signed/spoken English in highly technical situations and develop specialized vocabulary in areas typically utilizing transliterators. Three credit hours.

INTR 4382 Advanced Interpretation: ASL – English
Prerequisites: INTR 4330, 4370, QAST Level I/I or equivalent, or permission of program coordinator. Corequisite: INTR 4380. Restricted to students who have been admitted to the Interpretation program. Continuation of the interpretation process between ASL and English including application of process skills, contrastive ASL-English linguistics, contrastive cultural analysis, and teaming skills for the consecutive and simultaneous interpretation process. Designed to include practice of requisite skills and process tasks of increased complexity with unplanned and planned language samples, such as dialogues, monologues, interviews, and lectures from a variety of interpreting settings. Three credit hours.

INTR 4384 Interpreting Academic Subjects
Prerequisites: INTR 4330, 4370, 4346, QAST Level I/I or equivalent, or permission of program coordinator. Restricted to students who have been admitted to the Interpretation program. Acquisition of interpreting/transliterating skills across a variety of academic subjects commonly taught in elementary through post-secondary settings. Emphasis on incorporating and pairing conceptually accurate sign usage within a variety of English-bound sign systems, as well as acquisition of specialized sign vocabulary for academic content areas. Three credit hours.

INTR 4770 Internship
Prerequisites: Completion of all B.A. requirements. Practical experience in settings such as educational, rehabilitation, community service centers, and agencies serving children, adolescents, and/or adults who are deaf or hard of hearing. Designed to provide students with the opportunity to synthesize practical and academic experiences gained during the in-residence portion of the program. The site, supervision, and plan of activity will be agreed upon mutually by student and instructor before the semester begins. Seven credit hours.

INTS – International Studies

INTS 2301 World Cultures
A study of traditional culture of major world areas emphasizing values and systems that lead to cultural unity and cultural diversity, followed by a study of the modernization of each culture and the extent to which the cultures have interacted and changed as a result of intercultural contact during the 19th and 20th centuries. Three credit hours.

INTS 2302 Global Issues
A study of issues of concern throughout the modern world, the reaction of cultural entities to those issues, global dynamics, and the ways in which international assessments are made. Three credit hours.

INTS 3321 Topics in Modern International Cultures
Modern institutions and lifestyles in cultures selected from the major regions of Europe, Asia, Africa, and Latin America. The course emphasizes different patterns of behavior found in cultural areas outside the U.S. The specific focus of the course will vary from time to time. It may be repeated for credit if the content is different. Three credit hours.

INTS 3350, 3351 Cooperative Education Work Experience I and II
Prerequisites: major in international studies, INTS 2301, 2302, ECON 2321, FREN, GERM, or SPAN 2312, at least six upper-level required international studies hours, basic computer literacy, and consent of the international studies coordinator. Designed to complement and extend the classroom learning experience through application of theoretical concepts in a professional work environment with an international dimension. The exact number of work hours, activities, and responsibilities is dependent on the nature of the work experience and must be specified in a written agreement between employer and student in coordination with the Office of Cooperative Education. Three credit hours.

INTS 4101 Senior Research Project
Proposal. Required for international studies majors. An independent research project that is completed over two semesters under the guidance of a faculty supervisor whose field is related to the proposed area of investigation. The project has three components, consisting of a proposal (4101), a formal paper (4102), and an oral presentation (4103), each providing one hour of academic credit. A student may enroll in INTS 4102, 4103 only after completing an acceptable proposal (INTS 4101) in the previous semester. One credit hour.

INTS 4102 Senior Research Project
Formal Paper. Required for international studies majors. An independent research project that is completed over two semesters under the guidance of a faculty supervisor whose field is related to the proposed area of investigation. The project has three components, consisting of a proposal (4101), a formal paper (4102), and an oral presentation (4103), each providing one hour of academic credit. A student may enroll in INTS 4102, 4103 only after completing an acceptable proposal (INTS 4101) in the previous semester. Three credit hour.

INTS 4103 Senior Research Project
Oral Presentation. Required for international studies majors. An independent research project that is completed over two semesters under the guidance of a faculty supervisor whose field is related to the proposed area of investigation. The project has three components, consisting of a proposal (4101), a formal paper (4102), and an oral presentation (4103), each providing one hour of academic credit. A student may enroll in INTS 4102, 4103 only after completing an acceptable proposal (INTS 4101) in the previous semester. One credit hour.

INTS 4300 Seminar
For international studies majors. An integrative, in-depth study of a specified regional problem or global issue, related to the area of concentration, requiring analysis of traditional values and current issues and problems. Three credit hours.

INTS 4350 Internship
For international studies majors or minors. Field experience with businesses, industries, and agencies involved in the international arena. Supervised by the company or agency and a faculty member. Students are expected to apply theoretical concepts to active world situations and develop appropriate working skills and experience. Credit, no credit grading available on request. Three credit hours.

ITEC – Information Technology

ITEC 3610 Introduction to Information Technology and Applications
Prerequisite: admission to the information technology minor. This course introduces students to the information technology industry and knowledge-based tools. Students demonstrate proficiency in such tools as spreadsheet applications, graphic presentation, Internet uses, and programming. Methods include guest speakers, team activities, interpersonal skills, problem solving skills, time management skills, role playing, and portfolio strategies. Graded A, B, I, or NC. Six credit hours.

ITEC 3650 Guided Applications in Information Technology and Industry Processes
Prerequisite: grade of A, B, or I in ITEC 3610. Project oriented guided applications course. Focus is on broad applications of information technology such as database management, web design, and Internet applications. Students develop web pages to collect data, structure and analyze data using database and spreadsheet software, and present textual and graphical representation of the results. Methods include team projects with rotating roles, problem conceptualization, time management, and presentation skills. Graded A, B, I, or NC. Six credit hours.

ITEC 4610 Project Development and Portfolio Defense
Prerequisite: grade of A, B, or I in ITEC 3650. The project and portfolio development course allows students, under direction of a mentor, to work on real life issues in an active learning environment. Students will present and defend a professional IT portfolio documenting proficiency in the use of technology to solve problems. Methods include IT internships, special projects, or major field applications. This course is to be completed in two phases. The first phase, “Project Planning and Portfolio Development,” includes problem identification, needs assessment, and system design specifications. The second phase, “Project Completion and Portfolio Defense,” includes design testing, verification, and customer satisfaction. Students should expect that these two phases should take no less than one semester and no more than one academic year. Graded A, B, I, or NC. Six credit hours.

LANG – General Foreign Language

LANG 1321 English as a Foreign Language
A novice-level course for non-native speakers of English. Instruction in correct pronunciation, aural comprehension, and simple speaking ability leading to active mastery of basic reading, writing, and grammar.

LANG 1322 English as a Foreign Language
A novice-level course for non-native speakers of English. Instruction in correct pronunciation, aural comprehension, and simple speaking ability leading to active mastery of basic reading, writing, and grammar.

LANG 1323 English as a Foreign Language
A novice-level course for non-native speakers of English. Instruction in correct pronunciation, aural comprehension, and simple speaking ability leading to active mastery of basic reading, writing, and grammar.

LANG 1324 English as a Foreign Language
A novice-level course for non-native speakers of English. Instruction in correct pronunciation, aural comprehension, and simple speaking ability leading to active mastery of basic reading, writing, and grammar.

LANG 1111 Elementary Language Laboratory I
Corequisite: LANG 1311. Offered in a designated foreign language. Supervised laboratory practice in listening, speaking, and aural comprehension. One credit hour.

LANG 1112 Elementary Language Laboratory II
Corequisite: LANG 1312. Continuation of LANG 1111. One credit hour.

LANG 1210 Language for Travel and Business
Conversational skills in a designated foreign language for individuals interested in language primarily for travel and business. Will not substitute for any 1311, 1312, or 1315 language course. Two credit hours.

LANG 1212 Language for Travel and Business II
Continuation of LANG 1210. Will not substitute for any 1311, 1312, or 1315 language course. Two credit hours.

LANG 1311 Elementary Language I
Offered in a designated foreign language in response to student interest. A course for beginners with no knowledge of the specified language. Instruction in correct pronunciation, aural comprehension, and simple speaking ability leading to active mastery of basic grammar and a limited reading ability. Three credit hours.

LANG 1312 Elementary Language II
Prerequisite: LANG 1311 in specified language or equivalent. Continuation of LANG 1311. Three credit hours.

LANG 1321, 1322 English as a Foreign Language
An elementary course for nonnative speakers of English. Instruction in correct pronunciation, aural comprehension, and simple speaking ability leading to active mastery of basic grammar and a limited reading ability. Three credit hours.

LANG 1323, 1324 English as a Foreign Language
Prerequisites: LANG 1321, 1322, or equivalent proficiency. Continuation of LANG 1321, 1322. Three credit hours.

LANG 1325, 1326 English as a Foreign Language
Prerequisites: LANG 1323, 1324, or equivalent proficiency. Continuation of LANG 1323, 1324. Three credit hours.

LANG 1327, 1328 English as a Foreign Language
Prerequisites: LANG 1325, 1326, or equivalent proficiency. Continuation of LANG 1325, 1326. Three credit hours.

LANG 1390, 1391, 2390, 2391, 3390, 3391, 3690, 3691, 3692, 3693 Language Study Abroad
Prerequisite: study of language of region visited. Offered for study abroad only. A language skills acquisition course often including a study of the culture and civilization of the region visited. Level of credit determined by student’s placement abroad in a University-sanctioned program. Hours of credit determined prior to departure and based upon program content and duration. These courses do not satisfy the UALR second language proficiency requirement.

LANG 2302 Foreign Language for Music Students
Study and practice of pronunciation of Italian, French, and German for music students; selections from opera, folk music, and standard vocal repertoire. Cannot be used to fulfill requirements in the department. Three credit hours.

LANG 2311 Intermediate Language I
Prerequisite: LANG 1312 in specified language or equivalent. A continuation of LANG 1312, the intermediate course leads to greater facility in the spoken language and to more advanced reading skills. Three credit hours.

LANG 2312 Intermediate Language II
Prerequisite: LANG 2311 in specified language or equivalent. Continuation of LANG 2311. Three credit hours.

LANG 2350 Foreign Language Study Trip
Prerequisite: appropriate LANG 1312 or consent of department chairperson. Offered with study abroad programs only. In addition to practical experience in language usage, students will undertake various projects requiring language use. Three credit hours. This course does not satisfy the UALR second language proficiency requirement.

LANG 4322 Teaching Second Languages
An overview of methods and materials used to teach skill development in modern second languages, techniques considered most effective, and appropriate assessment strategies. Required for foreign language teacher certification and the ESL endorsement in the state of Arkansas. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as LANG 5322. Three credit hours.

LANG 4323 Second Language Acquisition
Prerequisite: junior standing. How second language is acquired by children and adults. A course for those preparing to teach students with limited English proficiency. Required for ESL endorsement in the state of Arkansas. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as LANG 5323. Three credit hours.

LANG 4324 Teaching People of Other Cultures
Prerequisite: junior standing. Cultural issues for teaching students with limited English proficiency. A required course for ESL endorsement in the state of Arkansas. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as LANG 5324. Three credit hours.

LANG 4325 Second Language Assessment
Prerequisite: junior standing. Examines goals, principles, instruments, and techniques of assessment and testing of second language learners, K-12 and adult. A required course for ESL endorsement in the state of Arkansas. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as LANG 5325. Three credit hours.

LANG 4350 Advanced Foreign Language Study Trip
Prerequisite: appropriate language at the junior level or consent of department chairperson (given for equivalent knowledge). Offered with study abroad programs only. In addition to gaining practical experience in language usage, students will choose and undertake a research project of their choice, requiring fluency. Three credit hours. This course does not satisfy the UALR second language proficiency requirement.

LESC – Leisure Science

LESC 1100 Team Sports I
Theory and practice needed to understand and develop an appropriate level of skill in flag football and volleyball. One credit hour.

LESC 1101 Team Sports II
Theory and practice needed to understand and develop an appropriate level of skill in basketball and softball. One credit hour.

LESC 1102 Sports Officiating
Emphasis is placed on developing the mechanics of signals, rules, and regulations to successfully officiate football, basketball, baseball, and softball. Practical applications of signals, rules, and regulations will be applied by the actual officiating of games. One credit hour.

LESC 1103 Beginning Ice Skating
For individuals who do not know how to ice skate. Emphasis on fundamentals, safety, and the basic steps. One credit hour.

LESC 1105 Beginning Swimming
For nonswimmers. Emphasis on fundamentals of swimming and water safety and the basic strokes: front crawl, back crawl, elementary backstroke, and side stroke. One credit hour.

LESC 1106 Scuba Diving
Theory and practice in the skills involved in the safe and effective use of snorkel, fins, face mask, and scuba equipment. Deep water training sessions are required for certification. A fee is charged for use of equipment and expense of deep water training sessions. One credit hour.

LESC 1107 Water Polo
Fundamental knowledge, techniques, and skills necessary to develop an understanding of and ability to play water polo. One credit hour.

LESC 1108 Water Aerobic Exercise
This course incorporates the health-related fitness components of muscular strength, muscular endurance and cardiovascular endurance in an aquatic environment. Due to increased resistance provided by water overload training, improvement should occur in these areas. Deep water exercises such as water walking and water jogging along with aerobic exercises done to music, combine to make up a stress-free fitness program. The ability to swim is not a prerequisite for water aerobic exercise. One credit hour.

LESC 1109 Racquetball
Emphasis is on developing skills in racquetball, presenting information on equipment safety, preliminaries to the strokes in racquetball, and introduction of the game itself. Practical application will enable the novice to develop both physical and mental skills to achieve in racquetball. One credit hour.

LESC 1111 Restrictive Activity
Designed for men and women who are physically unable to participate in other physical education activities. A statement from the family physician is required regarding the nature of the physical problem. One credit hour.

LESC 1112 Judo
Theory and practice of fundamentals of judo. Emphasis on the development of skills, rules, regulations, and necessary equipment. One credit hour.

LESC 1113 Karate
Theory and practice of fundamentals of karate. Emphasis on the development of skills, rules, regulations, and necessary equipment. One credit hour.

LESC 1114 Self-Defense
Fundamentals of self-defense designed for the individual interested in studying the scientific principles of gravity and body control over opposing forces as a self-protective device. One credit hour.

LESC 1115 Hunter Safety
A basic course in the principles of safe hunting. Qualifies students over 21 years of age for an Arkansas Game and Fish Commission Certificate as a Hunter Safety Instructor. One credit hour.

LESC 1116 Beginning Tennis
Emphasis on rules, scoring, selection of racket, grip, footwork, and body positioning. Also emphasizes forehand, backhand, serve, net volley, lob, fundamental strategy, and techniques of singles and doubles play. One credit hour.

LESC 1117 Beginning Golf
Theory and practice of fundamental skills and techniques of golf. Emphasis on rules and etiquette, use of one wood and three irons, grip, stance, backswing, head position, follow-through, approach shots, full strokes, and putting. A fee is charged. Held off campus. One credit hour.

LESC 1118 Beginning Badminton
Theory and practice of fundamental skills and techniques of badminton. Emphasis on stroke perfection and on strategy and techniques of singles and doubles play. One credit hour.

LESC 1119 Beginning Bowling
Theory and practice of fundamentals of bowling. Emphasis on four-step approach, consistency, body position, release, spot bowling, follow-through, timing, rebound, scoring, rules, and bowling etiquette. A fee is charged. Held off campus. One credit hour.

LESC 1120 Beginning Horseback Riding
Fundamental knowledge, techniques, and skills needed to develop appropriate skill. Emphasis on care of and adjustment to the horse and safety in riding. The walk, trot, canter, and introduction of jumping will also be emphasized. A fee is charged. Held off campus. One credit hour.

LESC 1121 Fencing I Beginning
An introduction to foil fencing. Designed to provide a sound basic understanding of the history, rules, etiquette, and safety aspects of the sport of fencing. Develops basic technical and tactical skills needed for novice-level competition through emphasis on basic offense and defense, continuation of attack, compound attacks, and practical bouting. One credit hour.

LESC 1122 Tumbling
This course includes the theory and practice for conditioning and developing basic skills in tumbling. Intermediate skills will be introduced during the latter half of the semester. Development of strength and flexibility is emphasized. One credit hour.

LESC 1123 Body Mechanics and Conditioning
Emphasis on self-improvement in fitness, conditioning, nutrition, strength development, weight loss or gain, efficient body mechanics, posture, and decreasing or increasing body measurements. One credit hour.

LESC 1124 Stretch/Stress Program
Emphasis is placed on a series of relaxing and effective stretches to help relieve tension, increase flexibility, and range of motion. The stress reduction section provides techniques to help relieve stress and tension. One credit hour.

LESC 1125 Lifetime Fitness
Emphasis is placed on developing an individual lifetime program to improve the health-related components of fitness and wellness. Practical application of principles of exercise and the science of nutrition will be major components in achieving and maintaining ideal body weight. One credit hour.

LESC 1126 Walking to Fitness
Emphasis is placed on developing an individual level of walking performance. Practical applications of principles of exercise and the components of an effective cardiovascular workout are used in achieving fitness through a walking program. One credit hour.

LESC 1128 Weight Lifting/Training
An introduction to the fundamentals of weight lifting applicable to the development of muscular strength and endurance. Principles of exercise, body composition goals, lift techniques, safety instruction, and flexibility maintenance are emphasized. One credit hour.

LESC 1131 Aikido
Theory and practice of fundamentals of Aikido. Concentration will be on the development of skills, rules, regulations, and necessary equipment. One credit hour.

LESC 2103 Intermediate Ice Skating
Review of material in LESC 1103. New material includes: back crossover, T stop, back crossover in a figure eight pattern, fast forward crossover, three turns, and T take off; review of door carries, forced outside and inside edges, open Mohawk turn, one foot snow plow, hockey stop, spin, and bunny hop. One credit hour.

LESC 2105 Intermediate Swimming
Prerequisite: LESC 1105 or equivalent. Review of three basic strokes: front crawl, back crawl, and elementary backstroke. Coordinated stroking in side strokes, breaststroke, inverted breaststroke. Development of strong isolated arm strokes and leg kicks, safety and survival skills, simple diving, simple rescue skills, artificial respiration, and distance swimming. One credit hour.

LESC 2116 Intermediate Tennis
Prerequisite: LESC 1116 or equivalent. Review of rules and scoring, selection of racket, grip, footwork and body positioning, forehand, backhand, serve and volley strokes, and game strategy. Developing the approach shot, lob, and overhead, and strengthening the volley and serve. Analysis of singles and doubles play strategy. One credit hour.

LESC 2117 Intermediate Golf
Prerequisite: LESC 1117 or equivalent. Review of the game of golf: rules, etiquette, selection of clubs, grip, stance, backswing, head position, follow-through, approach shots, full strokes, and putting. Appropriate use of one, three, and five woods and two, three, five, seven, eight, and nine irons. Irons: short approach shots, high loft, distance shots; woods: driver and use on fairway; putting: playing from rough hillside lies and sand traps. A fee is charged. Held off campus. One credit hour.

LESC 2119 Intermediate Bowling
Prerequisite: LESC 1119 or equivalent. Review of scoring rules, bowling etiquette, fundamentals, consistency, four-step approach, body position, aiming, back swing, release, follow-through, and rebound. Analysis of three-, four-, and five-step approaches, natural hook, severe hook, backup, and straight release; theories of aiming and principles of motion as they apply to bowling. A fee is charged. Held off campus. One credit hour.

LESC 2120 Intermediate Horseback Riding
Prerequisite: LESC 1120 or equivalent. Review and perfection of walk, trot, and canter, with emphasis on effective leads; effective use of rider’s body, hands, and legs. Introduction to barrel and cross-country course. A fee is charged. Held off campus. One credit hour.

LESC 2121 Fencing II Intermediate
An intermediate course designed to improve technical and tactical skills in the use of the foil. Intensive review of Fencing I, attacks on the blade, compound attacks, defense against compound attacks, tactics, defense, rules, and officiating; individual lessons, practice bouting, and class competition. One credit hour.

LESC 2122 Intermediate Gymnastics
Prerequisite: LESC 1122 or equivalent. Review of conditioning, basic skills in tumbling, and the vault. Free exercise routines, balance beam, and uneven bars for women; pommel horse, still rings, horizontal bar, and parallel bars for men. Introduction to composition of gymnastic routines. Strength and flexibility are emphasized. Students will perform required skills and routines and create routines. One credit hour.

LESC 2123 Body Mechanics II
Methods and techniques of developing strength, flexibility, and cardiovascular fitness using aerobic and self-improvement exercises. Conditioning will start slowly and progress to desirable levels of stress. One credit hour.

LESC 3103 Advanced Ice Skating
Review of material covered in LESC 2103. New material includes: squat and shoot-the-duck, review edges, layover step, layover and return, spinning, forward pivots, two-foot spins, half Mapes jumps, outside forward rolls, and spirals. One credit hour.

LESC 3105 Advanced Swimming
Prerequisite: LESC 2105 or equivalent. Review of coordinated strokes, side strokes, breaststroke, butterfly, and inverted breaststroke. Continued development of isolated arm strokes and leg kicks, safety and survival skills, rescue skills, and artificial respiration. Emphasis on coordinated strokes for extended distances, trudgen and trudgen crawl, floating and survival skills, surface diving, and underwater swimming and diving. One credit hour.

LESC 3106 Advanced Scuba Diving
Review of basic scuba techniques and safety procedures. Emphasis on water diving experience: safe diving procedures, limited visibility diving, light salvage and recovery diving, and deep and decompression diving. Advanced National Association of Underwater Instructors open water certification course. One credit hour.

LESC 3116 Advanced Tennis
Prerequisite: LESC 2116 or equivalent. Review of tennis fundamentals. Continued development of all strokes. Emphasis on development of serve, greater force and addition of spins, overhead smash, different types of lobs, different types of volleys, ground stroke, slice, and chop. Concentration on skill development in singles and doubles play and practice in tennis officiating. One credit hour.

LESC 3117 Advanced Golf
Prerequisite: LESC 2117 or equivalent. Review of golf fundamentals. Emphasis on development of approach shots, full shots with a club, and playing difficult lies, with concentration on improving putting skills. A fee is charged. Held off campus. One credit hour.

LESC 3119 Advanced Bowling
Prerequisite: LESC 2119 or equivalent. Review of bowling fundamentals. Emphasis on developing skill using a natural or severe hook. Concentration on body mechanics and principles of motion. A fee is charged. Held off campus. One credit hour.

LESC 3120 Advanced Horseback Riding
Prerequisite: LESC 2120 or equivalent. Emphasis on fine qualities of gaits; cause and solution to resistance problems; introduction to hunt seat; false and counter leads; cross-country and jumping tests; and understanding the health of the horse. A fee is charged. Held off campus. One credit hour.

LESC 4105 Lifeguard Training
Prerequisite: student must be able to swim 500 yards continuously. This is a course which will provide instruction of skills necessary for lifeguarding, CPR, and first aid training which will lead to Red Cross Lifeguard Certification. One credit hour.

LESC 4205 Water Safety Instructor
Prerequisites: LESC 4105, American National Red Cross water safety instructor’s certification. Methods and techniques of teaching swimming. Two hours lecture, two hours laboratory. Two credit hours.

MATH – Mathematics

MATH 0321 Pre-Core Mathematics
This is a course that is designed to prepare students with the necessary skills to be successful in college level mathematics. Topics include operations with real numbers (including exponents and radicals) and algebraic expressions, ratios, proportions, linear inequalities, linear and quadratic equations in one variable, linear equations in two variables, systems of linear equations, and logarithms. Two classroom hours plus required lab hours. Three credit hours.

MATH 0322 Pre-Core Mathematics
This course is a continuation of Math 0321 and intended for students who have modules left to complete from Math 0321.

MATH 0323 Pre-Core Mathematics
This course is a continuation of Math 0322 and intended for students who have modules left to complete from Math 0322.

MATH 0324 Pre-Core Mathematics
This course is a continuation of Math 0323 and intended for students who have modules left to complete from Math 0323.

MATH 1223 Introduction to Mathematics Software
Prerequisites: grades of C or greater in MATH 1302 and 1303, equivalent transfer courses. Symbolic and numerical manipulations in a Computer Algebra System (CAS); graphing; simple programming; spreadsheet fundamentals and mathematical typesetting. Four hours lab. Two credit hours.

MATH 1302 College Algebra
Prerequisite: A grade of C or greater in Math 0301 – Intermediate Algebra, a grade of AA, BA or CA in Math 0321 Pre-Core Mathematics, an equivalent transfer course, or an ACT Mathematics score of 21, or SAT Mathematics score greater than or equal to 500. Study of functions, including but not limited to, absolute value, quadratic, polynomial, rational, logarithmic, and exponential; systems of equations; and matrices. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours. (ACTS Course Number MATH 1103)

MATH 1303 Trigonometry
Prerequisite: a grade of C or greater in MATH 1302, an equivalent transfer course, or a suitable score on a mathematics placement test Corequisite with consent of instructor: MATH 1302. Circular functions and their graphs, identities, angles and their measure, functions of angles, right triangles, Law of Sines, Law of Cosines, inverses of circular functions, solutions of trigonometric equations, complex numbers, and DeMoivre’s Theorem. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours. (ACTS Course Number MATH 1203)

MATH 1311 Applied Calculus I
Prerequisite: a grade of C or greater in MATH 1302 or an equivalent transfer course or an ACT Mathematics score of 24. Not intended for mathematical science majors or minors. Introduction to differential and integral calculus of algebraic functions and their technical applications in the areas of optimization, mean values, and area. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

MATH 1312 Applied Calculus II
Prerequisites: grades of C or greater in MATH 1303 and either 1311 or 1451, or equivalent transfer courses, Differential and integral calculus of algebraic functions, transcendental functions, and vector-defined functions; integration techniques, parametric equations, and differential equations. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

MATH 1321 Quantitative and Mathematical Reasoning
Prerequisite: A grade of C or greater in Intermediate Algebra or an equivalent transfer course, or a grade of AQ, BQ, CQ, in any of UALR’s Pre-Core Mathematics courses (MATH 0321, MATH 0322, MATH 0323, MATH 0324), or a MATH ACT score of 21 or greater, or an SAT Mathematics score of 500 or greater. The overarching goal of Quantitative and Mathematical Reasoning is to provide students with mathematical understandings and skills to be productive workers, discerning consumers, and informed citizens. Students will solve problems using mathematical reasoning involving logic, proportions, algebra, and relations. In keeping with the tenets of student performance in a general education course, this course is designed to deliver instruction that focuses on process, conceptual understanding, communication and problem solving found in the following strands: (a) Personal, state and national finance (b) Statistics and probability (c) Mathematical modeling (d) Quantities and measurement. Students seeking a degree in a Non-STEM major are advised to take this course. Note: This course satisfies the state mandated requirement for the baccalaureate degree. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours. (ACTS Course Number MATH 1003)

MATH 1342 Business Calculus
Prerequisite: a grade of C or greater in MATH 1302, an equivalent transfer course, or a suitable score on a mathematics placement test. Differential and integral calculus with applications to economics and management sciences. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

MATH 1451 Calculus I
Prerequisites: grades of C or greater in MATH 1302 and 1303, equivalent transfer courses, or a suitable score on a mathematics placement test. Limits and limit theorems, continuity, derivatives and the chain rule, implicit differentiation, applications, the definite integral, the Fundamental Theorems of Calculus, and applications of integration. Three hours lecture. Two hours lab. Four credit hours. (ACTS Course Number MATH 2405)

MATH 1452 Calculus II
Prerequisite: a grade of C or greater in MATH 1451 or an equivalent transfer course. Integration, the definite and indefinite integrals, L’Hopital’s rule, improper integrals, Taylor polynomials, infinite series, power series, polar coordinates, and conic sections. Three lecture hours and two lab hours. Four credit hours. (ACTS Course Number MATH 2505)

MATH 2310 Discrete Mathematics
Prerequisite: a grade of C or greater in MATH 1302. Emphasizes applications of mathematics in computer science and other areas of modern technology. The topics include mathematical reasoning, set theory, proofs by induction, number systems, relations, directed graphs, trees, and related topics of study. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

MATH 2350 Introduction to Mathematical Proof
Prerequisite: a grade of C or greater in MATH 1451. An introduction to formal mathematical proof writing in the context of axiomatic systems. Symbolic logic, elementary set theory, methods of proof, mathematical induction, functions and relations, and additional topics in the context of axiomatic systems. Three credit hours.

MATH 2453 Calculus III
Prerequisite: a grade of C or greater in MATH 1452 or equivalent transfer course. Three-dimensional analytic geometry, vectors, lines, planes, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, line integrals, and gradient fields. Three lecture hours and two lab hours. Four credit hours. (ACTS Course Number MATH 2603)

MATH 3310 Algebraic Structures
Prerequisite: a grade of C or greater in MATH 2350. An introduction to modern algebraic structures. Topics include equivalence relations, groups, isomorphisms, direct products, rings, fields, and integral domains. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

MATH 3311 Number Theory
Prerequisite: a grade of C or greater in MATH 1302. Basic representation, the fundamental theorem of arithmetic, combinatorial and computational number theory, fundamentals of congruences, solving congruences, arithmetic functions, primitive roots, prime numbers, quadratic congruences, additivity. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

MATH 3312 Linear Algebra
Prerequisites: grades of C or greater in MATH 1312 or MATH 1452. Vector spaces, bases, polynomials, Cayley-Hamilton Theorem, invariant subspaces, linear transformations, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, selected applications, Jordan canonical form. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

MATH 3322 Introduction to Differential Equations
Prerequisite: a grade of C or greater in MATH 1452 (may be corequisite with consent of instructor). Methods of forming and solving some important types of ordinary differential equations and their application to selected physical and biological models. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

MATH 3324 Mathematical Models
Prerequisites: grades of C or greater in MATH 2453, 3312, STAT 3350. A study of selected topics from the physical and biological sciences demonstrating the interaction between model building and mathematical systems. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

MATH 3325 Mathematics of Optimization
Prerequisites: grades of C or greater in MATH 2453, 3312, STAT 3350. Linear programming. Simplex and revised simplex algorithms. Transportation problems, networks and flows, games and decisions. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

MATH 3330 College Geometry I
Prerequisite: a grade of C or greater in MATH 1451. A survey of secondary school geometry, the axiomatic method; Euclidean geometry; an introduction to nonEuclidean geometry. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

MATH 4100, 4200, 4300 Independent Study
Prerequisites: consent of department chairperson and supervising faculty member. Studies of assigned topics chosen to develop investigative, analytical, research, or professional skills related to mathematics, culminating in a written paper. Three hours lecture. One, two, or three credit hours.

MATH 4302 Complex Analysis
Prerequisite: a grade of C or greater in MATH 4303 or consent of instructor. Algebra of complex numbers, analytic functions, integration, power series, Laurent series, and elementary conformal mappings. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as MATH 5302. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

MATH 4303 Advanced Calculus I
Prerequisite: a grade of “C” or greater in MATH 2453 and 2350. Derivatives, mean value theorem, L’Hospital’s rule, integration, sequences, and a series of functions. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as MATH 5303. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

MATH 4304 Advanced Calculus II
Prerequisite: a grade of C or greater in MATH 4303. Functions of several variables, implicit function theorem, geometry of curves and surfaces, differential forms, Stoke’s theorem and Green’s theorem. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as MATH 5304. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

MATH 4305 Financial Mathematics
Prerequisite: MATH 1451 or equivalent. This course will cover some key procedures of the financial mathematics: determining equivalent measures of interest; discounting; accumulating; determining yield rates; estimating the rate of return on a fund; amortization. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

MATH 4306 Topology
Prerequisite: a grade of C or greater in MATH 2350 and MATH 2453. Topological spaces, connectedness, compactness, separation axioms, metric spaces, sequences, completeness, Urysohn’s metrization theorm. Additional topics selected from the Tychonoff theorem, compactifications, homotopy, the fundamental group, retractions and fixed points, the fundamental group of surfaces. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as MATH 5306. Three credit hours

MATH 4308 Integral Transform Theory
Prerequisite: a grade of C or greater in MATH 3322. Review of linear differential equations. The Laplace transform, functions of a complex variable, integration by the method of residues, the Laplace transform inversion integral. The Z-transform, the Z-transform inversion integral, difference equations, Fourier series, and the Fourier transform. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as MATH 5308. Three credit hours.

MATH 4310 Algebraic Structures II
Prerequisite: a grade of C or greater in MATH 3310. Continues the topics of Algebraic Structures I into more advanced topics of modern algebra including factor groups, polynomial rings, quotient rings, and extension fields. Three credit hours.

MATH 4323 Numerical Analysis
Prerequisites: grades of C or greater in MATH 2453, 3312, or equivalent courses; knowledge of a scientific programming language. Error analysis, fixed points and roots, interpolation, approximations, numerical differentiation and integration, linear systems, differential equations. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as MATH 5323. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

MATH 4361 History of Mathematics I
Prerequisite: grade of C or greater in MATH 1452. This course will provide an overview of aspects of the history of mathematics from the Early Beginnings (before the sixth century B.C.), Classical Period (sixth century B.C. to fifth century), and Medieval and Renaissance Periods (sixth century to sixteenth century). This survey course discusses a broad range of the history of mathematics including a variety of topics over many consecutive time periods, and is organized so that there is more discussion than lecture. The course will consider both the growth of mathematical ideas and the context in which these ideas developed, in various civilizations around the world. Attention will be paid to how the history of mathematics or mathematical ideas is important in the teaching of these ideas in both secondary school and college. Three credit hours.

MATH 4362 History of Mathematics II
Prerequisite: grade of C or greater in MATH 1452. This course will provide an overview of aspects of the history of mathematics from the Early Modern Period (seventeenth and eighteenth centuries) and the Modern Period (nineteenth and twentieth centuries). This survey course discusses a broad range of the history of mathematics including a variety of topics over many consecutive time periods, and is organized so that there is more discussion than lecture. The course will consider both the growth of mathematical ideas and the context in which these ideas developed in various civilizations around the world. Attention will be paid to how the history of mathematics or mathematical ideas is important to the teaching of these ideas in both secondary school and college. Three credit hours.

MATH 4390 Senior Seminar
Prerequisites: senior standing and major status in the Department of Mathematics and Statistics. Students in the course prepare and present senior projects and portfolios, prepare and take Major Fields Assessment Test in mathematics, pick, solve, and submit the solution of a problem from the problem sections of professional journals. This course is offered in the fall semester only and is to be taken by mathematics majors planning to graduate in the fall or the following spring. Three credit hours.

MATH 4199-4399 Selected Topics
Prerequisite: consent of instructor. The content of this course changes on demand. For descriptive title of the content refer to the semester schedule. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog at the 5000-level. One hour lecture for each hour credit. One, two, or three credit hours.

Courses in Mathematics Education (MATH)

The following courses are designed for the prospective early childhood, middle childhood, or secondary education teacher and cannot be used as part of the undergraduate major or minor in mathematics. For the courses appropriate to teacher licensure, contact the Department of Teacher Education.

MATH 3380 Mathematics I for Early Childhood
Prerequisites: admission to the early childhood/middle childhood education program (social studies/language arts specialty) and a grade of C or greater in MATH 1302 or 1315 or 1321. Problem solving, sets, system of whole numbers, system of integers, system of rational numbers, number theory, graphing, proportional reasoning, technology, and historical developments in mathematics. Includes mathematics content, teaching techniques, mathematics manipulatives, and technology. Emphasis on problem solving, reasoning, communication, and connections. Two hours lecture and two hours laboratory. Three credit hours.

MATH 3382 Mathematics II for Early Childhood
Prerequisites: admission to the early childhood education program and successful completion (C or greater) of MATH 3380. Second mathematics education course for early childhood education majors (no emphasis in mathematics). Problem-solving, estimation, number sense, development of computational algorithms, mental computation techniques, measurement of two- and three-dimensional objects, geometry, probability, data collection and analysis, technology, proportional reasoning, and historical developments in mathematics. Emphasis on problem solving, reasoning, communication, and connections. Two hours lecture and two hours laboratory. Three credit hours.

MATH 3383 Mathematics for Middle School
Prerequisites: admission to the middle childhood education program (mathematics/science specialty) and a grade of C or greater in MATH 1302. First mathematics course specifically for middle childhood education (mathematics/science specialty) majors. Problem solving; sets; number systems including whole numbers, integers, rational numbers, and real numbers; number theory; algebra; graphing; matrices; proportional reasoning; technology; and historical developments in mathematics. The course includes mathematics content, teaching techniques, mathematics manipulatives, and technology. Emphasis on problem solving, reasoning, communication, and connections. Two hours lecture and two hours laboratory. Three credit hours.

MATH 3384 Concepts in Geometry
Prerequisites: admission to the middle childhood education program and a grade of C or greater in MATH 3383 or MATH 3380. Problem solving, logic and sets, proofs, geometry as an axiomatic system, geometric figures in two and three dimensions, systems of measurement, congruence and similarity, geometry using coordinates, geometry using transformations, proportional reasoning, modeling real-world situations using geometry, networks, technology, and historical developments in geometry. Includes mathematics content, teaching techniques, mathematics manipulatives, and technology. Emphasis on problem solving, reasoning, communication, and connections. Two hours lecture and two hours laboratory. Three credit hours.

MATH 4380 Concepts in Probability and Statistics
Prerequisites: admission to the middle childhood education program and a grade of C or greater in MATH 3380 or MATH 3383. Problem solving, organizing data, averages and variation, regression and correlation, probability theory, normal distributions, sampling distributions, estimation, hypothesis testing involving one population, inferences about differences, proportional reasoning, technology, and historical developments in probability and statistics. Includes mathematics content, teaching techniques, mathematics manipulatives, and technology. Emphasis throughout the course is on problem solving, reasoning, communication, and connections. Two hours lecture and two hours laboratory. Three credit hours.

MATH 4381 Teaching Mathematics in Secondary School
Prerequisite: admission to the secondary education minor program or consent of the instructor. An overview of methods and materials used to teach secondary mathematics, techniques considered most effective, and appropriate assessment strategies. A link between mathematics content/skills and practical applications for classroom instruction. Includes mathematics content, teaching techniques, mathematics manipulatives, and technology. Emphasis throughout on problem solving, reasoning, communication, and connections. Required for secondary mathematics teacher licensure. Two hours lecture and two hours laboratory. Spring semester offering. Three credit hours.

MATH 4383 Technology in Math Education
Prerequisite: admission to the secondary education minor program, MATH 2453 and at least 12 upper-level hours in mathematics, or consent of instructor. Applications of technology in the secondary mathematics classroom. An overview of mathematics software appropriate for the secondary mathematics classroom. Emphasis throughout on problem solving, reasoning, communication, and connections. Required for secondary mathematics teacher licensure. Two hours lecture and two hours laboratory. Fall semester offering. Three credit hours.

MCED – Middle Childhood Education

MCED 3105 Field Experience I
This field experience will acquaint students with a variety of middle school experiences, and provide a 40 hour experience in a middle school classroom. Students will be oriented to the structure of a school district, the school, and the classroom setting. All concurrent courses in the Introduction to the Profession block will include assignments or specific tasks to be completed by students during the 40 hour classroom placement in this field experience. One credit hour.

MCED 3240 Field Experience II
Prerequisite: admission to the middle childhood teacher licensure program and successful completion of MCED 3105. This field experience will focus on working with students in small groups. Students will spend time in a middle school classroom working with students. Students will be expected to complete assignments related to all concurrent courses during the classroom placement. During this field experience students will continue to develop their professional portfolio and community resource file. Three credit hours.

MCED 3301 Middle Childhood Education, Family, and the Community
Prerequisite: admission to the teacher education program. Corequisite: MCED 3105. Presents strategies for working with families, state agencies, and community organizations from a middle childhood perspective. Information is provided about the nature, history, and philosophy of middle childhood education; the organization and structure of middle schools; teacher advisory systems; morally responsive teaching; teaching teams; multiculturalism; and diversity. Three credit hours.

MCED 3303 Middle Childhood Curriculum and Planning
Students will be oriented to the scope of the middle grades curriculum, varying patterns of curriculum organization, activities, and transition based teaching and general problem solving for instructional planning assessment and management. Introduction of the materials and various technology media used in teaching at the middle level. Field based experience required. Three credit hours.

MCED 3310 Middle Level Literacy and Literature
Provides the student with a broad perspective of literature and literacy instruction for middle school students with language as a central focus of study. Emphasis on exploring ways of engaging adolescents in meaningful literacy learning. Specific focus on differentiating instruction and integrating adolescent literature and writing throughout the curriculum. Involves preparation and evaluation of assessment and teaching procedures and strategies and a review of background information related to the reading process. Three credit hours.

MCED 3320 Integrating Curriculum: Language Arts and Social Studies
Prerequisite: admission to the middle childhood education program and completion of RHET1311, 1312; SPCH 1300; HIST 1311, 1312; HIST 2311 or 2312; POLS 1310; a three-hour literature course; a three hour geography course; and completion of the Introduction to the Profession block. This course facilitates the understanding of how to teach social studies and language arts through an integrated approach in the most effective way to children in the middle grades. Instructional techniques that teach students how to involve children in social, interactive learning will be presented. Students will plan for and provide developmentally appropriate hands-on experiences with appropriate materials and the supportive environment necessary for children’s meaningful exploration and discovery and will implement those experiences in a field placement. Students will also be required to conduct assessments of learning. Three credit hours.

MCED 3330 Integrating Curriculum: Science and Mathematics
Prerequisites: admission to the middle childhood education program and completion of eight hours of science and nine hours of mathematics. Corequisite: MCED 3240. Emphasizes integrated mathematics and science content and how to teach this content to middle level children. The student should use the content to develop thematic concepts which are implemented through the methodologies of inquiry based, hands-on learning with the use of manipulatives. Students utilize the internet and technology as an integrative tool to develop pedagogical techniques and materials in relation to whole course design with cross-disciplinary focus and active student involvement. Three credit hours.

MCED 3402 Middle Childhood and Early Adolescent Development and Learning
Corequisite: MCED 3105 Field Experience I. A study of the hereditary and environmental influences on the cognitive, emotional, physical, sexual, and social development of children from birth through adolescence with a special emphasis on their pre- and early adolescent development. The impact of the broader culture and atypical development will also be part of the course’s focus. Students observe, record, and analyze behavior and development of children in an educational setting. Four credit hours.

MCED 4120 Licensure Seminar
A review of educational psychology, assessment, motivation, and student expectations. Classroom scenarios requiring application of teacher decision-making skills and classroom management strategies will be presented. In addition, students will analyze case studies. Prepares students for the Praxis II examination; in order to pass this seminar, students must attain the standard set by the Arkansas State Board of Education. One credit hour.

MCED 4501 Internship I
Prerequisites: admission to middle childhood education program and completion of the Introduction to the Profession and Curriculum Applications semesters. Corequisites: MCED 4310 and 4330. Classroom observation and participation in classroom routines with gradual assumption of complete classroom teaching responsibilities. Students plan, teach, and reflect on the total experience. Students make accommodations for children with special needs. All of the school resources are used, and competence in using technology is required. Three credit hours.

MCED 4303 Professional Seminar
Corequisite: MCED 4502. Part of final semester, Professional Practicum II. Presentations by College of Education faculty and practitioners in the field concerning such topics as legal issues affecting educational practice; family constellations; adolescent misbehavior; behavior analysis; discipline involving logical and natural consequences in place of rewards and punishments; and encouragement. Students create a professional portfolio, and submit a senior exit project utilizing interactive technology. Students learn how to prepare for job interviews; what to expect the first teaching year; how to maintain a professional portfolio to demonstrate growth; how to reflect on personal development; and what is involved in meeting the Arkansas Teacher Licensure Standards. Four credit hours.

MCED 4310 Middle Level Content Literacy
Emphasis on the development of reading in the content areas for middle school students. Focus on the concepts of developing meaningful literacy experiences for adolescents of all ability levels, with a continued focus on language and literature as an integral part of the curriculum. Involves a study of major theories and current teaching strategies in literacy for adolescents. Evaluation and assessment strategies explored. Three credit hours.

MCED 4430 Classroom Management
Emphasizes fundamental principles underlying middle childhood developmental programs in middle level grades, including creation of and fostering of classroom management techniques and strategies for the design of environments which are conducive to a safe place for teaching, learning, and connecting the community to the school for effective discipline and parental support and involvement. Four credit hours.

MCED 4602 Internship II
Prerequisites: admission to the middle childhood education program and the successful completion of Internship I. Corequisite: concurrent enrollment in TCED 4320. The final field placement course. Students plan, teach, and reflect on the experience. Students responsible for all aspects of the classroom environment including making accommodations for children with special needs. All of the school resources will be used, and competence in using technology is required. Five credit hours.

MCOM – Mass Communication

MCOM 1300 Careers in Mass Media FYC
Orientation to mass communication major, mass media profession and UALR. Helps students reach their educational objectives. Interactive instructional methods promote the development of critical thinking skills and positive educational values. Students 1) learn to identify and use appropriate resources both on campus and within the community; 2) acquire skills needed to promote study, personal wellness, goal setting and achievement; 3) develop strategies to manage time, stress and conflict resolution.

MCOM 2300 Introduction to Media Production
Required in Media Design and Production sequence. Fundamentals of audio control-room procedures, audio recording and editing, single camera field production, and video editing. Emphasis on proper use and handling of equipment. Minimal exposure to video study practices. Three credit hours.

MCOM 2306 Introduction to Motion Pictures
Basic elements of movies, the process of movie making, and the approaches to movie aesthetics and criticism. Assignments may include viewing motion pictures at local theatres. Three credit hours.

MCOM 2308 Introduction to Scriptwriting
Prerequisite: MCOM 2300 and MCOM 2320. Required in Media Design and Production sequence. Study and practice in basic writing and scripting skills needed for the production of electronic media messages and programs. Use of the SMC computer labs. Three credit hours.

MCOM 2320 Issues in Mass Media Writing
Prerequisite: RHET 1311. This course will introduce students to the general literature and issues in the convergent mass communication field, emphasizing public relations, journalism, the web, entertainment media, technology related to mass media, and the advertising that supports mass media. It will also focus on writing issues related to media. Three credit hours.

MCOM 2330 Mass Media and Society
Required in all School of Mass Communication majors and some minors. Survey of relationships involving mass media, culture, and various other interconnected systems, both nationally and globally. Includes discussion of functions, freedoms, and responsibilities of mass media and effects on individuals and groups. Topics will include newspapers, magazines, radio, television, Internet, and developing media. Three credit hours.

MCOM 2350 Beginning Reporting
Prerequisite or co-requisite: MCOM 2320. Introduction to basic news and feature writing skills. Style and story structure for print and electronic media. Laboratory instruction and practice in writing for publication. Three credit hours.

MCOM 3310 Introduction to Web Principles and Design
Prerequisites: MCOM 2320, and MCOM 2350 or MCOM 2308. This course will introduce students to web design and development from the mass-communication perspective. It will serve as an introduction to the World Wide Web, and basic web design techniques. The course concentrates on history, social implications, navigation, authoring, and basic validation and submission of information across the Internet. In addition to theoretical and analytical foundations, the primary technologies employed are HTML 4.x; SHTML; Cascading Style Sheets; File Transfer Protocol; and Document Object Modeling. Three credit hours.

MCOM 3315 Mass Media Research
Prerequisite: Grade of C or greater in MCOM 2320 and MCOM 2330. This course will introduce students to a survey of research methods and their application in the study of mass communication. Students will also receive practice in determining the appropriate choice of research method for a mass communication problem of their choosing. Three credit hours.

MCOM 3320 Advanced Reporting
Prerequisites: MCOM 2320 and MCOM 2350. Application of principles of news writing to journalism practice; development of skills in evaluating the news, interviewing, and gathering information. Laboratory instruction and practice in objective reporting. Materials submitted as assignments are subject to dissemination through print and broadcast media and on the World Wide Web. Three credit hours.

MCOM 3330 Photojournalism
Fundamentals of news and feature photography for newspaper, magazine, and the Web. Materials submitted as assignments are subject to publication. Use of the SMC computer labs. Three credit hours.

MCOM 3345 Studio Production
Prerequisite: MCOM 2300. A practical study and application of video production with an emphasis on studio and multi-camera productions. Three credit hours.

MCOM 3350 Introduction to News Editing
Prerequisites: MCOM 2320 and MCOM 2350. Introduction to news editing. Instruction and practice in print audio and video editing in terms of content and style. Use of computers to edit copy and images; fundamentals of design for print and online media. Three credit hours.

MCOM 3355 History of the American Movies
History and development of the American entertainment motion picture industry from the technological to the aesthetic and social to the economic perspectives. Includes the evolution of the movie industry as it relates to audience uses and gratifications. Three credit hours.

MCOM 3356 Movie Criticism
Criticism of contemporary movies, concentrating on the creative elements used in the service of aesthetics and the application of scholarly and popular critical standards. Certain historical references are included. Assignments include the viewing of motion pictures at local theatres. Three credit hours.

MCOM 3360 Law, Policy, Ethics
Prerequisites: MCOM 2320, and MCOM 2330 (may be taken concurrently). This course will examine current legal, policy, and ethical issues affecting the broadcast, cable, print, and interactive media. Three credit hours.

MCOM 3365 Radio-Television Journalism
Prerequisites: MCOM 2300, MCOM 2320. MCOM 2350 may be taken as prerequisite or corequisite. MCOM 2300 is recommended but not required as a prerequisite. The course provides study and practice in the basic methods of writing and producing for radio and television news. The course will also evaluate audio and video streaming of material on news-related websites, and may include having student work presented online. Three credit hours.

MCOM 3366 Electronic News Gathering
Prerequisites: MCOM 2300, MCOM 2320, MCOM 2350, MCOM 3365, MCOM 3367, and MCOM 3370. MCOM 3315 is strongly recommended as a prerequisite, but is not required. Production of programs for the electronic media. Students function individually and on news teams to develop high quality on-the-air news programs, with video streaming of appropriate student work and some use of the Web for research. Three credit hours.

MCOM 3367 News Producing and Anchoring
Prerequisites: MCOM 2300, MCOM 2320, MCOM 2350, and MCOM 3365, or consent of instructor based upon documented media experience. This purpose of the course is to teach students the rudiments of radio and television newscast producing and anchoring, emphasizing TV. Students will be encouraged to develop critical thinking skills about selecting and organizing news material and graphics, writing and delivering stories, and managing, timing and promoting newscasts. Three credit hours.

MCOM 3370 Announcing and Performance
Prerequisite: MCOM 2320 or consent of instructor based upon prior media experience. Development of performance skills necessary for effective communication via the electronic media. Emphasis on announcing and visual presentation techniques, script reading, and adapting to the demands of electronic media technologies. Three credit hours.

MCOM 3380 Mass Communication Practicum
Prerequisite: junior standing. Work experiences in on-campus media under the direction of a School of Mass Communication professor. Periodic written and oral reports to the professor coordinating the study. Three credit hours.

MCOM 3390 Non-linear Video Editing I
Prerequisite: MCOM 2300. The basics of non-linear editing and use of Adobe Premier software. Three credit hours.

MCOM 4308 Screenwriting
Prerequisite: Mass Communication majors must have completed MCOM 2320 and MCOM 2330 with a C or greater. No prerequisites for Film minors. Learn the process, structure and skills used in writing minor picture screenplays. Three credit hours.

MCOM 4310 Media Sales
Prerequisites: MCOM 2320 and MCOM 2330. Examination of the elements, skills and strategies associated with selling broadcasts, cable, print, and interactive advertising. Three credit hours.

MCOM 4312 Management Strategies
Prerequisite: MCOM 2310 and MCOM 2330. Roles and responsibilities of media managers in broadcast, cable, print, and interactive organizations. Emphasis on coordinating work units and personnel, legal obligations, resource generation and management, public relations, and the new technologies. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as MCOM 5312. Three credit hours.

MCOM 4320 Non-linear Video Editing II
MCOM 2300, and MCOM 3390. A practical study of non-linear editing in the field of video production. Three credit hours.

MCOM 4330 Lighting
Prerequisite: Grade of C or greater in MCOM 2300. This course will provide students with a practical study and application of lighting techniques for video production. Students will learn studio and location lighting. Three credit hours.

MCOM 4332 Digital Audio Production
Prerequisites: MCOM 2320, MCOM 2300 and MCOM 2330 with a C or greater. Study and practice in advanced audio pre-production, production, and post-production elements used in radio, television, the Internet and other electronic media. Three credit hours.

MCOM 4340 Introduction to Digital Graphics and Animation
Prerequisites: MCOM 2300, and MCOM 3390. This course is designed to encompass a basic understanding of design elements of Adobe Photoshop and After Effects. Students will be exposed to a variety of photographic challenges geared toward creative problem solving and real-life experience in video production presentation. Three credit hours.

MCOM 4342 Movie Making Techniques
Prerequisite: MCOM 2300 and MCOM 3390. A practical study and application of video production with an emphasis on movie making techniques. The class will start out making a movie together then, with skills learned, will proceed to make their own movies in groups. Three credit hours.

MCOM 4350 Design and Production
Prerequisites: junior standing and MCOM 2320 or consent of instructor. Decision-making in the editing process. Principles of typography, publication design, and printing processes. Experience in the use of computers to design camera-ready materials for publication. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as MCOM 5350. Three credit hours.

MCOM 4352 News Media and the First Amendment
Prerequisites: junior standing, MCOM 3360 is recommended. The restrictions, obligations, and responsibilities of the news media; the law and its effect on publishing and broadcasting; relations between the law and freedoms protected by the U.S. Constitution. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as MCOM 5352. Three credit hours.

MCOM 4353 History of the Mass Media in America
Prerequisite: junior standing. Development of the mass media from their beginnings. Emphasis on the interaction between the media and the political, economic, technological, and social factors surrounding the media. Three credit hours.

MCOM 4354 Documentary Techniques
Prerequisite: MCOM 2300 and MCOM 3390. A practical study and application of video production with an emphasis on documentaries. The class will start out making features together. Then, with newly learned skills, will proceed to make their own documentaries in groups. Three credit hours.

MCOM 4357 Seminar in Radio-Television Journalism
Prerequisite: junior standing. Broadcast news policies; history; governmental and other forms of regulation; social implications; influence of various publics on radio-television news coverage. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as MCOM 5357. Three credit hours.

MCOM 4359 Feature and Magazine Journalism
Prerequisite: MCOM 3320 and MCOM 2350. Planning, researching and writing the feature article for newspapers, magazines and online publications. Emphasis on humanistic reporting and providing a context for the news through thorough research and application of this research to the article. Materials submitted as assignments are subject to publication. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as MCOM 5359. Three credit hours.

MCOM 4368 News Practices
Prerequisites: MCOM 2300, MCOM 2320, MCOM 2350, MCOM 3365, MCOM 3366, MCOM 3367, MCOM 3315 is strongly recommended as a prerequisite, but it is not required. Production of programs for the electronic media. Students function individually and on news teams to develop high quality on-the-air news programs with video streaming of appropriate student work and some use of the Web for research, as well as Webcasting, when Appropriate. Three credit hours.

MCOM 4375 Journalistic Freedom and Responsibility
Prerequisite: Junior standing. Journalistic ethics and practices; professional conduct and responsibilities of the journalist in a free society. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as MCOM 5375. Three credit hours.

MCOM 4380 Public Relations Writing
Prerequisites: MCOM 2350. The journalistic function in public relations, includes the writing and processing of news and feature releases for print and electronic media and editing internal and external publications. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as MCOM 5380. Three credit hours.

MCOM 4381 Public Relations Cases
Prerequisites: ADVT 3340, MCOM 2330, MCOM 2320, MCOM 2350; corequisite: MCOM 3315. Study of recent public relations cases involving business, industry, institutions and government. Students will also be introduced to public relations theories as they are applied in case studies and will analyze cases in terms of the component parts. Three credit hours.

MCOM 4382 Public Relations Campaigns
Prerequisites: ADVT 3340, MCOM 2320, MCOM 2350, MCOM 3315, MCOM, 4380, MCOM 4381, or consent of instructor. Capstone course for the Strategic Communication sequence. A study of the planning and implementation of the public relations campaign with special emphasis on the application of public relations principles introduced in ADVT 4310. Includes student service learning project. Three credit hours.

MCOM 4384 Topics in Mass Communication
Prerequisite: Junior standing and/or consent of instructor. Advanced and specialized topics in mass communication, especially those of current interest and relevance to mass communication professionals. Possible subjects include the following: journalism, entertainment, production and design, Web and media, strategic communication, mass media etc. Classes will provide an in-depth understanding of topics chosen. Refer to the semester schedule for specific topics offered. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as MCOM 5384. Three credit hours.

MCOM 4385 Advanced Web Design
Prerequisites: MCOM 2320, MCOM 2350, or MCOM 2308. This course will serve as part two in a sequence of courses dealing with mass communication and the World Wide Web. A specific concentration in server communication and publishing corporate web pages, as well as using basic programming logic combined with HTML. Three credit hours.

MCOM 4388 Reporting of Public Affairs
Prerequisites: MCOM 2320, MCOM 2350, and MCOM 3320. MCOM 3315 and MCOM 3360 may be taken as prerequisites or corequisites. Class may also be taken with consent of instructor based upon demonstrable advanced media experience. Practice in gathering materials and writing in-depth stories on public affairs; emphasis on courts, police, government, education, ecology, the economy, and social issues. Materials submitted as assignments are subject to online postings. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as MCOM 5388. Three credit hours.

MCOM 4189, 4289, 4389 Independent Study
Prerequisites: junior standing, consent of instructor, approval of independent study proposal before registration. Individual in-depth study, research, or designated on-campus practicum related to broadcast journalism, news-editorial, public relations options, or professional and technical writing. Up to three hours may be counted toward the major. One, two, or three credit hours.

MCOM 4390 Mass Communication Internship
Prerequisites: senior standing, consent of school director. Work experiences either in the commercial media or in other designated media under the direction of a mass communication professional. Periodic written and oral reports to the professor coordinating the study. Three credit hours.

MCOM 4391 Mass Communication Cooperative Education
Prerequisites: junior standing, consent of school director and director of cooperative education. Work experiences either in the commercial media under direction of professional journalists or in positions under supervision of public relations specialists. Periodic written and oral reports to the professor coordinating the study. Credit awarded for employment involving at least 20 hours per week and successful completion of specific instructional objectives that provide new learning on the job and in the major. Students who take this course may not take MCOM 4390. Three credit hours.

MCOM 4395 Producing and Directing
Prerequisites: MCOM 2300, MCOM 2308, MCOM 3345 or MCOM 4342, or MCOM 3390 and senior standing. This course is intended as the capstone course for the Media Production and Design sequence. Emphasis on accepting TV directing methodology, and on the producer’s role in developing television programming. Program development from initial concept through the completed program. The students will be expected to produce and direct television projects at near professional levels. Three credit hours.

MGMT – Management

MGMT 1300 Introduction to Business
A survey of business organization and operation, the various fields of business, basic business problems and procedures, the vocabulary of business, and the opportunities open to college graduates in business. Not open to junior and senior majors within the college. Three credit hours. (ACTS Course Number BUS 1013)

MGMT 2300 Supervisory Management
The supervisor and his or her relations with subordinates, superiors, colleagues, unions, and society. Emphasis on managerial aspects common to all supervisory positions, regardless of the technical specialty involved or the nature of the organization. Three credit hours.

MGMT 3300 Principles of Management
Introduction to organizational operations, internal and external forces, planning, decision and control processes. Introduction to the various organizational functions required to operate a successful business or non-profit organization. Three credit hours.

MGMT 3304 Operations Management
Prerequisite: BINS 3380 (or MGMT 3380) and ECON 3355 (may be taken concurrently). The course covers a breadth of concepts, tools, and methods that managers use to solve operating problems in manufacturing and service environments. The course takes a customer centric approach of internal business processes and highlights the linkages between these processes. Topics are selected from project management, operations strategy, quality management, inventory management, capacity planning, theory of constraints, transportation / assignment problems, and an introduction to supply chain management. Three credit hours.

MGMT 3306 Quality Assurance and Improvement
Prerequisite: ECON 2312 or ECON 3355. Quality control techniques, standards, and policies for production and operations environments; role of purchasing agent and engineer in specifying and insuring standards for purchased components; design and development of quality control and quality assurance systems throughout the organization. Three credit hours.

MGMT 3320 Human Resources Management
The principles of planning, directing, and controlling the personnel function. Emphasis on the effective implementation of a comprehensive personnel program, including the recruitment, development, evaluation, and motivation of employees. Three credit hours.

MGMT 3340 Managing People in Organizations
Prerequisites: MGMT 3300 or equivalent. A study and integration of basic managerial concepts and behavioral sciences as they affect people in organizations. Emphasis on environmental and inter-organizational forces that influence membership behavior. Three credit hours.

MGMT 3362 Venture Management and Decision Making
Corequisite: MGMT 3300 or consent of instructor. The operation of a successful small business including feasibility studies for expansion/growth, business plans, strategic management, marketing, financing, and human resource considerations. Three credit hours.

MGMT 3364 Family Business Management
Prerequisite: MGMT 3300. Management of family firm issues such as the interaction of family members, business objectives versus family objectives, succession planning, management development, motivation, and estate planning. Emphasis on the transition from personal management practices to professional management practices. Three credit hours.

MGMT 3392 Cooperative Education I
Prerequisite: consent of faculty sponsor and department chair prior to enrolling in the course. Provides experience in an organizational setting designed to integrate theory and practice. Course is offered on a credit/no credit basis only, with credit being equivalent to C or greater performance. Three credit hours.

MGMT 4100, 4300 Independent Study
Prerequisites: senior standing, management major with a minimum GPA of 3.00, consent of instructor. Individual study in the application of sound management principles to the solution of business problems. One or three credit hours.

MGMT 4304 Supply Chain Management
Prerequisite: MGMT 3304 and BINS 3380 (or MGMT 3380). Students are introduced to different concepts and issues that firms face in managing supply chains. The course will address different frameworks and quantitative methods for designing, managing, and analyzing the supply chain operations needed to support a firm’s business strategy. Students will study the structure of supply chain operations, and analyze the relationship between supply chain structure and performance, developing analytical models. Three credit hours.

MGMT 4309 Seminar: Special Topics in CIS/MIS
Topics especially relevant to Management Information Systems professionals will be offered on an elective basis. Such topics include, but are not limited to data communication, e-commerce technologies, and IS security. Three credit hours.

MGMT 4341 Labor and Industrial Relations
The industrial relations system and environment, including legal and economic constraints on participants in the bargaining process. Emphasis on collective bargaining as a power relationship in a conflict situation. Three credit hours.

MGMT 4342 Negotiation and Administration of Collective Bargaining Agreements
Prerequisite: MGMT 4341. Lecture and extensive use of case studies to develop the strategy and tactics of contract negotiation, application, and interpretation. Emphasis on the grievance process and arbitration. Three credit hours.

MGMT 4360 Compensation Management
Prerequisite: MGMT 3320. Administration of the total compensation program as a tool of management, including the use of job descriptions, job analysis and evaluation, and other necessary considerations in initiating and executing wage and salary administration. Three credit hours.

MGMT 4361 Business Planning and Product Introduction
Prerequisites: MGMT 3362 or consent of instructor. The role of the entrepreneur in new venture development. Identifying, assessing, and developing entrepreneurial opportunities. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as MGMT 5361. Three credit hours.

MGMT 4363 Financing Entrepreneurial Ventures
Prerequisites: FINC 3310 and MGMT 3300. Financing alternatives for new and growing ventures; debt financing from investment banks, commercial banks, and SBIC, as well as equity financing from angel investors, private placements, venture capitalists, and public equity markets. Students use firm valuation methods and calculate return to investors to create a capital plan for a growing enterprise. Three credit hours.

MGMT 4365 Business Consulting
Prerequisite: MGMT 3362 or consent of instructor. Teams of students consult with local small businesses recommended by the Arkansas Small Business and Technology Development Center or other business resources. Students work on problems in accounting, production, marketing, personnel, finance, insurance, law, and information systems. Student teams write reports outlining the problems and recommended solutions. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as MGMT 5365. Three credit hours.

MGMT 4372 Construction Business Management
Surveys organizational and management topics from the perspectives of the construction industry. Missions, goals and objectives, strategies, and organizational structures are reviewed. Business plans are developed along with practice in using decision models. Total quality management is reviewed along with training plans. Also covered are external relations to regulation, unions, communities, suppliers, and customers. Three credit hours.

MGMT 4375 Sustainable Business
A cross-disciplinary course to introduce students to the emerging field of sustainability and its triple-bottom line focus on the social, environmental, and economic impacts of business. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as MGMT 5375. Three credit hours.

MGMT 4377 International Business Management
Prerequisite: MGMT 3300 or consent of the instructor. Key objectives are to define and evaluate the field of international business, to analyze the international operating context with an emphasis on the basics of cultural differences, and to discuss the management of key functional activities in firms operating in global markets. Major topics include the nature of international business; economic theory and international business operations; international systems and institutions and the analysis of key dimensions of the overseas operating environment. The management of the primary functional activities in international firms emphasized, with the focus on strategies, tactics, and structures for dealing with the special problems and challenges arising in global markets. Three credit hours.

MGMT 4378 Global Operations Management
Prerequisites: MGMT 3304 or senior standing and consent of the instructor. Focuses on managing manufacturing and service operations across national boundaries to provide an organization with a competitive advantage. Emphasis on strategic benefits of globalization through coordinated operations located in different countries and mastering both technological and social/cultural obstacles. Students analyze a series of cases that address the unique issues of global operations management. Three credit hours.

MGMT 4380 Business Strategy
Prerequisites: MGMT 3300, BINS 3352, BINS 3380 (or MGMT 3380), MGMT 3304, ECON 3355 (or ECON 2312), FINC 3310, MKTG 3350 and be an officially accepted College of Business major. Integration of business concepts and techniques and their application to the development of corporate strategy and strategic planning by senior corporate executives. Includes setting objectives, developing business purposes, determining opportunities and threats, and implementing decision and control systems across functional areas. Three credit hours.

MGMT 4383 Entrepreneurial Perspectives
Prerequisite: junior standing. A significant exposure to the entrepreneurial process. Interaction with real-world entrepreneurs will enhance the entrepreneurial decision-making abilities of the students. Three credit hours.

MGMT 4385 Special Topics in Management
Topics of current relevance to management professionals. Three credit hours.

MGMT 4391 Employment Law
An examination of legal problems involving employment discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, national origin, or age. Examines the impact of developing principles of employment law on pre-employment inquiries and testing, seniority and promotions, and other personnel policies, practices, and procedures; affirmative action requirements; state and federal law used to resolve employment discrimination claims; the procedural framework for raising and adjudicating such claims before administrative agencies and the courts; requirements of the Fair Labor Standards Act, Equal Pay Act, ERISA, Worker’s Compensation, and OSHA; and current issues such as sexual harassment and employee dismissal. Three credit hours.

MGMT 4393 Cooperative Education II
Prerequisites: MGMT 3392 and consent of instructor and department chair prior to enrolling in the course. Provides experience in an organizational setting designed to integrate theory and practice. Course is offered on a credit/no credit basis only, with credit being equivalent to C or greater performance. Three credit hours.

MGMT 4394 Internship
Prerequisites: at least 90 semester hours earned with a minimum overall grade point average of 3.0 or department approval; a minimum of 12 semester hours of upper-level management courses completed; consent of instructor and department chair. Practical experience in an organizational setting designed to integrate management theory and applications. A written report is required. Course is offered on a credit/no credit basis only, with credit being equivalent to C or greater performance. Three credit hours.

MGMT 4395 Applications in HR Mgmt
Prerequisites: MGMT 3320 or MGMT 4391. This course is completely applied-oriented in which students get and opportunity to extensively practice Human Resource Management knowledge and skills. It is designed to help students become better equipped in the identification and utilization of successful Human Resource Management concepts and practices at their current or future workplaces. This course will help students become better managers and leaders in their organizations. Three credit hours.

MKTG – Marketing

MKTG 2330 Introduction to Sustainability
This interdisciplinary course introduces students to the concept of sustainability and the greatest sustainability challenges or our time related to natural, social, built, and managed systems. Students will study each module in class, prepare a research presentation related to one topic module, and participate in a community engagement service learning project related to one module. The course will challenge students to take action toward increased personal sustainability and responsibility. Cross listed as POLS and CNMG 2330.

MKTG 2380 Legal Environment of Business
Introduction to the American legal system. Provides a background of the legal environment as it pertains to profit and nonprofit organizations, along with ethical considerations and social and political influences as they affect such organizations. Three credit hours.

MKTG 3300 Business Professionalism
Principles and techniques of professionalism for the individual sales and marketing executive, and the management of professional image and conduct. Three credit hours.

MKTG 3350 Principles of Marketing
Prerequisite: junior standing. Introduction to the structure and functions of the marketing system of the economy and to marketing practices of organizations. Includes examination of the environments of marketing decision making, marketing institutions and agencies, and marketing practices of organizations. Three credit hours.

MKTG 3352 Seminar in Current Topics
Prerequisite: 54 or more credit hours. Topics of current interest and importance in marketing and advertising/public relations. Three credit hours.

MKTG 3353 Professional Selling
Prerequisite: MKTG 3350 An examination of the requirements and responsibilities of professional sales representatives, including knowledge and skill requirements, market development, preparation, effective sales communications, and customer relations. Three credit hours.

MKTG 3361 Physical Distribution
Prerequisite: MKTG 3350. Examines the marketing and cost-saving opportunities in the physical movement of goods between supplier, manufacturer, and consumer. Specific functions such as transportation, warehousing, packaging, material handling, order processing, and others will be studied and integrated into various distribution strategies. Three credit hours.

MKTG 3370 Principles of Retailing
Prerequisite: MKTG 3350. Principles of retail store management, including competition, trade area and location analysis, merchandising and inventory control, store layout, promotion, managing employees, and customer service. Three credit hours.

MKTG 3381 Advanced Business Law
Prerequisite: MKTG 2380. A comprehensive overview of business law including the law of contracts, commercial paper, bankruptcy, agency, organizations, sales, property, securities, and other topics of interest to business students and particularly to those majoring in accounting who intend to take the CPA exam. This course does not apply toward the marketing elective requirement. Three credit hours.

MKTG 3385 Consumer Analysis and Behavior
Prerequisites: PSYC 2300, MKTG 3350. An analysis of the personal, environmental, and interpersonal forces affecting consumer decisions and of their implications for marketing strategy development. Three credit hours.

MKTG 4199 Honors Seminar in Marketing
Prerequisites: senior standing, consent of department chairperson. Accelerated seminar on the latest developments in marketing strategy and marketing management, team taught by the departmental faculty. Students will prepare and present an honors paper. One credit hour.

MKTG 4310 Marketing Research
Prerequisite: MKTG 3350 or consent of instructor. A study of the development and use of information for marketing decision making; research methods applied to problems of market segmentation, pricing, distribution, promotional strategy, and development of marketing strategies. Three credit hours.

MKTG 4320 International Marketing
Prerequisite: MKTG 3350. Introduction to the major dimensions of the international marketing environment. Study of planning for and managing international marketing operations. The focus is on strategies, procedures and structures for dealing with the particular problems and challenges arising in the international marketing process. Three credit hours.

MKTG 4341 Brand and Market Consulting
Prerequisite: MKTG 3350. Examines the key tasks facing brand managers, including analyzing the marketing environment and developing objectives and strategies for the product or service. Involves the day-to-day responsibilities for managing either a single product or service or a closely-related product line. Heavy emphasis on marketing mix decisions concerning pricing, product, service, promotion, and distribution strategies. Students work in brand management teams to develop a marketing plan for a product or service. Three credit hours.

MKTG 4351 Sales Management
Prerequisite: MKTG 3350 and MKTG 3353. Administration of the professional sales force. Includes recruitment, selection, training, organization, motivation, compensation, routing and scheduling, and control of sales staff. Three credit hours.

MKTG 4355 Advanced Professional Selling
Prerequisites: MKTG 3350, MKTG 3353. Advanced techniques of salesmanship, field application of selling techniques, improving communications skills. Key focus is key account selling and relationship management. Problem solving as the basis of consultative selling. Business-to-business emphasis. Three credit hours.

MKTG 4360 Purchasing
Prerequisite: MKTG 3350. Management of materials acquisition and control as it relates to the engineering, production, marketing, and finance functions of the organization. Three credit hours.

MKTG 4370 Business-to-Business Marketing
Prerequisite: MKTG 3350. Cases and concepts of marketing products from one business to another. This course includes specific strategies and techniques for the development of product policy, pricing, promotion, and distribution of business products. Three credit hours.

MKTG 4378 Real Estate Law
Prerequisite: FINC 3370. An introduction to the nature of real property; ownership rights and estates; descriptions; easements, fixtures, liens, sales, land contracts; mortgage law; deeds and property transfers; cooperatives and condominiums; wills and intestate succession; zoning; and recent developments. This course does not apply toward the marketing elective requirement. Three credit hours.

MKTG 4385 Marketing Management
Prerequisites: senior standing, MKTG 3350, MKTG 3385, MKTG 4310, ADVT 3300, MKTG 3353. The application of marketing concepts and techniques to the solution of marketing problems, includes product positioning, product and product line, price, channels of distribution, advertising, and personal selling. The case study method is emphasized. Three credit hours.

MKTG 4390 Independent Study
Prerequisites: consent of instructor and department chair, minimum 3.00 GPA. Research and independent investigation in specific areas of marketing of interest to the student. Three credit hours.

MKTG 4395 Cooperative Education I
Prerequisites: senior standing, major in marketing or advertising, completion of at least nine hours of upper-level marketing or advertising courses with a grade of C or greater, cumulative GPA of 2.50, and consent of a sponsoring faculty member prior to registration. Designed to complement and extend the classroom learning experience through the application of marketing theories and concepts in a professional work environment. A written project, designed in consultation with the faculty member, and a minimum of 200 hours with a participating employer during the semester are required. The exact number of weekly work hours, activities, and responsibilities are dependent upon the nature of the work experience and must be specified in written agreements between the student, faculty member, and the Office of Cooperative Education. This course is accepted as elective credit in the marketing or advertising/public relations major. Course is offered on a credit/no credit basis only. Three credit hours.

MKTG 4396 Cooperative Education II
Prerequisites: credit for the completion of MKTG 4395 and consent of a sponsoring faculty member prior to registration. Designed as the continuation of MKTG 4395. A written project, designed in consultation with the faculty member, and a minimum of 200 hours with a participating employer during the semester are required. The exact number of weekly work hours, activities, and responsibilities are dependent upon the nature of the work experience and must be specified in written agreements between the student, faculty member, and the Office of Cooperative Education. This course is not accepted as elective credit in the marketing or advertising/public relations major. Course is offered on a credit/no credit basis only. Three credit hours.

MUAP – Applied Music

MUAP 1000 Recital Attendance
Attendance at concerts, recitals, student convocations, etc., as required by departmental policies.

MUAP 1100 Third-Age Piano Class
Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. designed for individuals who are interested in pursuing piano study in a less-formal group setting. Various technical, reading, and harmonization topics explored for performance of solo and ensemble works. May be repeated for credit. One credit hour.

MUAP 1104 Vocal Study
Group vocal studies designed for beginning music majors. Group application of proper breathing, phrasing and general attributes of correct vocal production. Introduction to study of the International Phonetic Alphabet. For music majors only.

MUAP 1111 First Year Experience
This course is designed to provide first time music majors with experiences that will help them succeed at the university and as musicians in the field. Together, we will work to establish habits that will help students succeed and we will explore tools and information that will be useful to students when they leave the university.

MUAP 1114 Piano Class I
Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. For beginning piano students with little or no keyboard experience. Basic skills required to play the piano will be addressed in a group setting. Topics explored include piano technique, music reading, basic harmonization, transposition and theory and keyboard fundamentals. One credit hour. Music majors only.

MUAP 1164 Piano Class II
Prerequisite: MUAP 1114 with grade of C or greater. A continuation of Piano Class I designed to continue development of keyboard facility through technique, sight reading, harmonization, and a variety of solo and ensemble piano repertoire. One credit hour. Music majors only.

MUAP 1201 Guitar Reading I
Prerequisite: MUAP 1203 with B or greater or consent of instructor based on audition to demonstrate familiarity with guitar and music fundamentals. Instrumental laboratory for guitarists, emphasizing reading studies in a variety of music styles. Two credit hours.

MUAP 1202 Guitar Reading II
Prerequisite: MUAP 1201 or consent of instructor. A continuation of Guitar Reading I with emphasis on chord chart reading. Comping in various styles will be discussed and more advanced materials will be used to improve simple line reading. Two credit hours.

MUAP 1203 Pop Guitar Class
Designed as an alternative to conventional class guitar, this course teaches theory, technique, and control through the performance of songs in the pop-rock idiom. Class time is divided between the introduction of a concept or technique and its application in the songs provided. The course is open to anyone. Two credit hours.

MUAP 1204 Voice Class I
For beginning voice students. Application of vocal principles to develop singing facility. Group application of proper breathing, phrasing, and general attributes of correct vocal production. Two credit hours.

MUAP 1244 Voice Class II
Prerequisite: MUAP 1204 or consent of instructor. Group vocal instruction with emphasis on the development of vocal technique and individual performance of art songs. Two credit hours.

MUAP 2184 Piano Class III
Prerequisite: MUAP 1164 with grade of C or greater. Designed to hone the skills introduced in Piano Class II, with an emphasis on sight reading, playing from lead sheets, and on playing a variety of intermediate solo and ensemble repertoire from various stylistic periods. One credit hour. Music majors only.

MUAP 2218 Voice for Musical Theatre
Prerequisite: MUAP 1204 or consent of instructor. A vocal performance class studying the techniques for singing in musical theatre. Staging of individual numbers and audition preparation. Two credit hours.

MUAP 2350 Songwriting
Organizational factors needed to identify the components of song form and integrate formal design and enlarged key areas into music. Designed for non-music and music majors. Three credit hours.

MUAP 3111 English Diction
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. This course will broaden students’ understandings of English-language sounds as they are applied to both speech and classical singing and impart an understanding of the American Standard, Mid-Atlantic and British Received Pronunciation dialects. Students will be introduced to the International Phonetic Alphabet and learn its application to English-language Opera and Art Song. Frequent performances in the classroom setting will allow students to directly apply this knowledge to their performance craft.

MUAP 3112 Italian Diction
Prerequisite: MUAP 3111 with grade of C or greater, Consent of Instructor. This course will broaden students’ understanding of Italian-language sounds as they are applied to both speech and classical singing. Students will learn to transcribe Italian with the International Phonetic Alphabet and learn its application to Italian-language Opera and Art Song. Frequent performances in the classroom setting will allow students to directly apply this knowledge to their performance craft.

MUAP 3113 German Diction
Prerequisite: MUAP 3111 with grade of C or greater; Consent of Instructor. This course will broaden students’ understandings of German-language sounds as they are applied to both speech and classical singing. Students will learn to transcribe German with the International Phonetic Alphabet and learn its application to German-language Opera and Art Song. Frequent performances in the classroom setting will allow students to directly apply this knowledge to their performance craft.

MUAP 3113 French Diction
Prerequisite: MUAP 3111 with grade of C or greater, Consent of Instructor. This course will broaden students’ understandings of French-language sounds as they are applied to classical singing and distinguished from the spoken language. Students will learn to transcribe French with the International Phonetic Alphabet and learn its application to French-language Opera and Art Song. Frequent performances in the classroom setting will allow students to directly apply this knowledge to their performance craft.

MUAP 3124 Conducting I
Prerequisite: MUTH 3381 with a grade of C or greater or consent of instructor. Fundamentals of conducting, applicable to both instrumental and choral ensembles; patterns and basic conducting techniques, conducting of musical examples in both genres. One credit hour. Music majors only.

MUAP 3165 Piano Class IV
Prerequisite: MUAP 2184 with a grade of B or higher, and MUTH 3191 with grade of C or greater or consent of instructor. Beginning with an intensive review of basic functional piano skills, more advanced sight reading at the keyboard, harmonization skills, improvisation techniques, simple accompaniments, and solo piano repertoire will be explored. One credit hour. Music majors only.

MUAP 2154, 2254, 2354 Special Topics
Prerequisites: MUAP 1204, 1244; 1214, 1264; or consent of instructor. Class vocal or piano instruction in various forms of musical repertoire and style, such as musical theatre, jazz and pop, or religious solos. One, two, or three credit hours.

MUAP 3325 Conducting II
Prerequisite: MUTH 3224 or consent of instructor. Conducting techniques relative to both choral and instrumental ensembles, including blend, balance, phrasing, diction, instrumental transposition, expressive devices and basic styles of choral/instrumental music literature; conducting of music examples in both genres. Three credit hours.

MUED – Music Education

MUED 2101 Woodwind Techniques
This course is designed for students pursuing a degree in music education. Students will explore teaching techniques appropriate for public school students learning to play woodwind instruments. Students will learn the basic principles of playing by performing on each of the woodwind instruments. Topics will include ranges, fingerings, transpositions, basic instrument maintenance, method books and teaching techniques. For music majors only.

MUED 2102 Brass Techniques
This course is designed for students pursuing a degree in music education. Students will explore teaching techniques appropriate for public school students learning to play brass instruments. Students will learn the basic principles of playing by performing on each of the brass instruments and they will learn to diagnose problems typical of young players. Topics will include range of the brass instruments, fingerings, transpositions, basic instrument maintenance, method books and teaching techniques. For music majors only.

MUED 2103 Percussion Techniques
This course is designed for music education majors pursuing teaching careers in instrumental music education. Course objectives include study of rhythm, technique, sound production, repertoire, and pedagogy on snare drum, marching percussion, drumset, hand drums, timpani, and other percussion instruments. For music majors only.

MUED 2104 String Techniques
This course is designed for students pursuing a degree in music education. Students will explore teaching techniques appropriate for public school students learning to play string instruments. Students will learn the basic principles of playing by performing on each of the string instruments and they will learn to diagnose problems typical of young players. Topics will include ranges of the string instruments, fingerings, basic instrument maintenance, method books and teaching techniques. For music majors only.

MUED 2200 Foundations of Music Education
Students will explore the historical, philosophical, and social foundations of music education. Additionally, students will examine resources for music teaching and will investigate twentieth century developments in music education. For music majors only.

MUED 3122 Composing & Arranging for School Ensembles
This course is designed for students pursuing a degree in music education. Students will explore ways to compose and arrange music for PreK-12 school ensembles. Students will learn the basics of composing, scoring, and arranging. Topics will include harmonizing a melody, planning the arrangement, writing accompaniments, composing an original score, and adapting scores for special ensembles.

MUED 3122 Composing & Arranging for School Ensembles
This course is designed for students pursuing a degree in music education. Students will explore ways to compose and arrange music for PreK-12 school ensembles. Students will learn the basics of composing, scoring, and arranging. Topics will include harmonizing a melody, planning the arrangement, writing accompaniments, composing an original score, and adapting scores for special ensembles.

MUED 3123 Global Styles and Practices in Music Education
This course will focus on the issues, teaching materials, and techniques involved in incorporating music cultures of United States and related world music repertoires in K-12 classroom instruction. For music majors only.

MUED 3214 Vocal Pedagogy
Designed as an introduction to the art and science of vocal teaching. Information on the special physiological and acoustical conditions found in child and adolescent voices will be explored. Students will gain knowledge and understanding of the vocal instrument and will learn to apply this knowledge to their singing and teaching. For music majors only.

MUED 3232 Early Childhood Music
The emphasis is on activities, creative projects, and developing vocal and instrumental skills useful to the early childhood teacher for both musical and non-musical integrated classroom activities. Students will develop skills in making lesson plans for musical activities and integrating music with the other arts, other subjects, and other peoples, places, and cultures. Not open to music majors for credit. Two credit hours.

MUED 3302 Piano Pedagogy
Prerequisite: completion of MUPR 2226 jury, and MUHL 2200, or consent of instructor. Study of methods and pedagogical material for piano teachers. Three credit hours.

MUED 3314 Vocal Pedagogy
Study of methods and pedagogical literature for voice teachers. Three credit hours.

MUED 3315 Teaching Music in Performance Ensembles
Students will explore methods and materials appropriate for effective music teaching in school ensembles. Topics will include: working with diverse students, selecting appropriate literature, teaching musicianship in an ensemble setting, assessment in the arts, and program development in bands, choirs, and orchestras. For music majors only.

MUED 3322 Teaching General Music
Characteristics of child growth and their implications in music, establishing music objectives, translating objectives into a developmental sequence of experiences, understanding skills, and knowledge. A practical course for music teachers, emphasizing selection of music and methods of teaching of classroom music to children in elementary school. Three credit hours.

MUED 4352 Piano Practicum
Prerequisite: MUED 3302 and completion of MUPR 3226 jury. Practice teaching and observation of class instruction in piano at beginning levels for children and adults, and of individual instruction in piano from elementary through intermediate levels. Lesson plans and procedures for teaching specific concepts in piano performance. Three credit hours.

MUED 4192, 4292, 4392 Special Studies and Workshops
Prerequisite: consent of music chairperson. Individual and group participation in special studies and workshops in music education. One, two, or three credit hours.

MUED 4252 Perspectives on Careers in Music
Prerequisite: must have passed the upper-level qualifying jury in MUPR, as well as MUTH 2391 and MUTH 2292, or consent of instructor. Course objective is to broaden the student’s understanding of the range of careers in the world of professional music. The course will explore music as both a creative endeavor and as a product. Students will learn how music progresses from artistic creation to consumable product, and how the participants in the music business make a living utilizing skills in marketing, performance, teaching, recording, technology, venue management, etc. Dual listed in the Graduate Catalog as MUED 5252. MUED 5252 is not open to students who already have credit for 4252. Two credit hours.

MUEN – Music Ensemble

MUEN 1104, 2104, 3104, 4104 Techniques of Accompanying
Prerequisite: audition. A course designed to equip the keyboard major to function as an accompanist. This course offers both theoretical and practical experience. One credit hour.

MUEN 1113, 2113, 3113, 4113 University Concert Choir
Prerequisite: audition scheduled with instructor. For experienced choral singers; open to students of any major. The concert choir is a large, select soprano, alto, tenor, bass (SATB) choral ensemble that performs with repertoire of selections representative of the Renaissance through the contemporary periods. One credit hour.

MUEN 1117, 2117, 3117, 4117 Chamber Singers
Prerequisite: consent of instructor; open to students of any major. A small, select soprano, alto, tenor, bass (SATB) choral ensemble that performs repertoire from various stylistic periods especially written for performance by a small ensemble. One credit hour.

MUEN 1137, 2137, 3137, 4137 Women’s Choir
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Small group of soprano, mezzo and alto voices performing a variety of music arranged or composed for women’s voices. Includes instrumental accompaniment. One credit hour.

MUEN 1140, 2140, 3140, 4140 Community Choir
Prerequisite: audition and consent of instructor. Open to community members, UALR students, faculty, and staff of all experience levels. Prepares and performs major choral literature. May be repeated for credit. One credit hour.

MUEN 1150, 2150, 3150, 4150 Opera Performance
Prerequisite: consent of instructor; open to students of any major. Study, through exercises and performances of acting techniques, that aids the singing-actor in the dramatic presentation of operatic repertoire. Once credit hour.

MUEN 1153, 2153, 3153, 4153 Jazz Ensemble
Prerequisite: consent of instructor. An ensemble studying and performing music in the jazz and jazz-rock styles, with emphasis on instrumental repertoire. One credit hour.

MUEN 1160, 2160, 3160, 4160 Jazz Combo
Prerequisite: consent of instructor. A small ensemble studying and performing music in jazz styles. One credit hour.

MUEN 1167, 2167, 3167, 4167 University Gospel Chorale
A performance class that develops the execution of traditional, standard, contemporary, and original compositions of African-American gospel music. Vocal and instrumental techniques, as well as ensemble and improvisational skills, will be developed and improved. One credit hour.

MUEN 1173, 2173, 3173, 4173 Percussion Ensemble
Prerequisite: consent of instructor. A small ensemble featuring repertoire written for a number of percussion instruments. One credit hour.

MUEN 1183, 2183, 4183 Piano Ensemble
Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Ensemble performance involving piano duos from various musical periods. One credit hour.

MUEN 3183 Piano Ensemble
Prerequisites: two semesters of MUPR 2226 (applied piano), consent of instructor. Ensemble performance involving piano duos from various musical periods. One credit hour.

MUEN 1188, 2188, 3188, 4188 Guitar Ensemble
A performance class for guitarists and bass guitarists. Standard and original works arranged in jazz, pop, and rock styles; will develop reading ability, as well as ensemble and improvisational skills. One credit hour.

MUEN 1194, 2194, 3194, 4194 Basketball Band
Prerequisite: consent of instructor. An ensemble that performs at UALR basketball games. One credit hour.

MUEN 1196, 2196, 3196, 4196 Chamber Ensembles
Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Small chamber ensembles, such as trios, quartets, quintets, of woodwinds, brass, and stringed instruments for chamber music experiences. One credit hour.

MUEN 4101 Community Orchestra
Prerequisite: consent of instructor; no audition required. Open to community members, UALR students, faculty, and staff of all experience levels. Prepares and performs music in all styles in the full orchestra medium. May be repeated for credit. One credit hour.

MUEN 4197 Indian Percussion Ensemble
Group and individual instruction in Indian percussion instruments, primarily chenda (South Indian drum), wood block (upon which chenda patterns are learned prior to instruction on the chenda), and to a lesser extent, ilattalam (cymbals) and tabla (North Indian drums). No prerequisites. Offered every semester.

MUHL – Music History and Literature

MUHL 2305 Introduction to Music
Recommended prerequisite: RHET 1311. Introduction to the creative process and history of music, vocabulary and descriptive terms used in the musical arts, and how to write about them. Attendance at arts events is required. Students will learn through writing, reading, discussing, listening, and participating in critical thinking and problem-solving activities. Fulfills core requirement in aesthetics along with ARHA 2305 or THEA 2305. Three credit hours. (ACTS Course Number MUSC 1003)

MUHL 3322 Survey of Western Art Music
Prerequisite: MUHL 2305. A survey of the development of Western art music from antiquity to the present, and an introduction to selected non-Western traditions, with emphasis on the study of music literature through recordings. Required for all BA music major emphases. Lecture. Three credit hours.

MUHL 3331 Music History I
Prerequisite: MUHL 3331 and a reading knowledge of music. A continuation of Music History I. A survey of the development of music in western civilization from 1750 to the present, as well as in selected non-western cultures during that time period with emphasis on the study of music through scores and recordings. Three credit hours. Required for all music majors.

MUHL 3341 Music History II
Prerequisites: MUHL 3331, MUTH 2391. A continuation of Music History I. A survey of music in Western civilization from 1750 to the present. Three credit hours.

MUHL 3351 The History of Rock
A study of the evolution of rock music from its pre-rock origins to the present. Three credit hours.

MUHL 3361 Jazz History and Styles
A study of the development and styles of jazz and its principal exponents. Three credit hours.

MUHL 3370 History of the Blues
A comprehensive study of the origins and development, as well as the evolution, of blues forms from their origins to their present state. Three credit hours.

MUHL 3371 Non-Western Music
Prerequisite: MUHL 2305 or consent of instructor. A study of selected areas of world music outside Europe and North America through a variety of approaches: playing the music, clapping or singing, listening, studying it in its cultural context. Satisfies music literature requirement for music majors and minors. Three credit hours.

MUHL 3381 American Music
Prerequisite: MUHL 2305 or consent of instructor. A study of American musical traditions of the last four centuries, including classical, ragtime, jazz, blues, slave music, spirituals, gospel, musical theatre, white Protestant, popular, rock, American Indian, and country. Satisfies music literature requirement for music majors and minors. Three credit hours.

MUHL 3391 Opera
Prerequisite: MUHL 2305 or consent of instructor. A survey of the development of opera, with emphasis on the study of opera through scores and videos. Especially recommended for voice majors and minors with an interest in opera. Offered every two years (Fall).

MUHL 3392 Orchestral Music
Prerequisite: MUHL 2305 or consent of instructor, and a reading knowledge of music. A survey of the development of orchestral music through scores and recordings. Especially recommended for strings, winds, and percussion majors and minors. Offered every two years (spring).

MUHL 3393 Choral Music History
Prerequisite: MUHL 2305 or consent of instructor, and a reading knowledge of music. A survey of the development of choral music through scores and recordings. Especially recommended for voice majors and minors with an interest in choral music. Offered every two years (Spring).

MUHL 4191, 4291, 4391 Special Studies
Prerequisite: consent of music chairperson. Special individual or group research in music history. One, two, or three credit hours.

MUHL 4311 Vocal Literature
Study of solo literature, history and materials for singers, including lieder, arias, songs, and song cycles. Three credit hours.

MUHL 4374 Piano Literature I
Prerequisite: MUED 3302, or consent of instructor. Study of solo piano literature, including Baroque preludes and fugues, dance suites, toccatas, Classical sonatas, and theme and variation sets, up to about 1800. Three credit hours.

MUHL 4377 Piano Literature II
Prerequisite: MUHL 4374, or consent of instructor. Continuation of Piano Literature I, with emphasis on Romantic etudes and character pieces, sonatas, and twentieth-century works. Three credit hours.

MUPR – Private Music

Credits earned on the basis of lesson duration. An upper-level course number implies advanced proficiency in performance technique and repertoire.
MUPR 1xxx-Minor or elective study, may be repeated for credit
MUPR 2xxx-First-year principal performance area for music major, 2 semesters. By audition only.
MUPR 3xxx-Second-year major study, 2 semesters. By passing jury for MUPR 2xxx only.
MUPR 4xxx-Optional third-year major study, 2 semesters. By passing jury for MUPR 3xxx only (may be repeated for credit).
A one-credit lesson means a 30-minute lesson weekly, and requires a minimum of one hour of daily practice. A two-credit lesson means a 55-minute lesson weekly, and requires a minimum of two hours of daily practice. BA music majors are expected to perform at least once per year in a public recital such as Student Recital Hour.
An applied music fee is charged for all individual instruction. See “Tuition and Fees.” Audition repertoire guidelines are available from the instructor in each performance area, and on the department website.

MUPR 3000 Junior Recital
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Performance of a 30-minute recital by students completing the third year of their music study.

MUPR 4000 Junior Recital
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Performance of a 60-minute recital by students completing the fourth year of their music study.

MUTH – Music Theory

MUTH 1211 Rhythmic Skills
The rhythmic component of the music fundamentals package. This course will help develop the rhythmic control, accuracy, and notation skill necessary for performance, composition, and music education. Class time will be devoted primarily to ensemble performance of rhythms and development of rhythmic sight-reading ability. Lecture and laboratory. Two credit hours.

MUTH 1310 Music Fundamentals
This course is designed to serve both as a preparatory music theory course for the music major and as a music fundamentals course for the non-major or music minor. This course will fulfill the MUTH requirement for the minor. Students will learn about the fundamental rhythmic, melodic, and harmonic practices in Western music and the notational terms and symbols commonly used to communicate these aspects of a musical language. In addition to the study of written materials, students participating in this web-enhanced class will gain basic keyboard knowledge, basic aural skills and fundamental theory concepts through the use of computer-based theory tutorial software and various web-based theory tutorials. Lecture, laboratory, and online components. Upon completion of this course, students wishing to continue with music theory courses will be required to pass a theory fundamentals assessment with a grade of 80% or greater. Three credit hours.

MUTH 1381 Introduction to Theory
Foundation course in music theory for the music major. Topics include fundamental rhythmic, melodic, and harmonic practices in Western music and the notational terms and symbols commonly used to communicate these aspects of a musical language. In addition to the study of written materials, students participating in this class will gain basic keyboard knowledge and basic aural skills practices. Three credit hours.

MUTH 2191 Aural Skills I
Prerequisites: MUTH 1381 and MUAP 1114 with a grade of C or greater. Corequisites: MUAP 1164 and MUTH 2381. This course is a lab course for MUTH 2381. Diatonic music will be the focus of sight singing and dictation exercises in simple and compound meters. Rhythmic reading with conducting patterns. Listening techniques will include error detection, interval, scale and chord identification, triad factor identification, melodic, rhythmic dictation. 1 credit hour. (Spring)

MUTH 2193 Aural Skills II
Prerequisites: MUTH 2192, MUTH 2381 and MUAP 1164 with a grade of C or greater. Corequisites: MUTH 2391 and MUAP 2184. This course is a lab course for MUTH 2391. A continuation of MUTH 2193. Simple chromatic usage will be featured in melodic and harmonic dictation exercises and sight singing. Rhythms in simple and compound meters with varying subdivisions. 1 credit hour.

MUTH 2381 Music Theory I
Prerequisites: MUTH 1381 with a grade of C or greater; Corequisite: MUTH 2192. This course is designed as a continuing music theory course for the music majors and music minors. This course will fulfill the MUTH requirement for the minor. Students will learn about cadences, non-harmonic tones, voice leading in four voices, harmonic progression and harmonic rhythm, dominant seventh chords, leading-tone seventh chords, and non- dominant seventh chords. Three credit hours.

MUTH 2391 Music Theory II
Prerequisites: MUTH 2381 and MUTH 2192 with a grade of C or greater. Corequisite: MUTH 2193. Students will build on MUTH 2381 Theory I knowledge of rhythm, melody, and harmony by learning about and gaining mastery of the structural elements of music primarily from the Classical era, but also from the Baroque and Romantic eras in Western music. Students will gain basic keyboard knowledge and aural skills of the 17th- and 18th century theoretical concepts through the use of computer-based theory tutorial software (MacGamut CAI), vocal part-writing exercises, and score study. Three credit hours.

MUTH 3120, 3220, 3320 Special Topics
Prerequisite: four semesters of theory or consent of instructor based on placement examination. Harmonic or formal practices and styles such as fugue, sonata form, serial composition, or form and analysis. One, two, or three credit hours.

MUTH 3192 Aural Skills III
Prerequisites: MUTH 2192, MUTH 2391, MUAP 2184 with a grade of C or greater. Corequisite: MUTH 3381 and MUAP 3165. This course is a lab course for MUTH 3381. A continuation of MUTH 2193, including more advanced ear training and sight singing. 1 credit hour.

MUTH 3231 Form and Analysis
Prerequisite: MUTH 2292, 2391, grades of C or greater for declared music majors or consent of instructor or department advisor. A survey of forms, shapes and genres in music of the common practice period (1600-1900) emphasizing the designations and categories of form. Principles of variety and unity and the language of musical analysis in standard tonal structure will be the topic of study. Two credit hours.

MUTH 3381 Music Theory III
Prerequisites: MUTH 2391, MUTH 2193 and MUAP 2184 with a grade of C or greater. Corequisite: MUTH 3192 and MUAP 3185. This fourth course in the music theory sequence will predominately focus on the chromatic elements found in texture, harmony, and melody of the music of the Romantic era as well as some of the chromatic elements within the Classical and Baroque eras of Western music. Students will gain and demonstrate knowledge of the period through written traditional Roman numeral score analysis, macro-analysis, chord building exercises, four-voice part-writing exercises, choral, keyboard, chamber instrumental music, and performance of keyboard reductions of sections from a variety of symphonic works; and, identify both aurally and through written score analysis characteristic modalities, harmonies (diatonic and chromatic), phrase and cadence types, and structural components of typical Beethoven, Chopin, and Wolf instrumental and vocal composition. Three credit hours.

MUTH 4310 Arranging
Prerequisite: MUTH 2391. A study of the characteristics and styles of arranging for band, orchestral instruments, and chorus. A historical survey of choral and instrumental writing in the Renaissance, Baroque, Classical, Romantic and Twentieth Century, with arranging exercises for each period. Three credit hours.

MUTH 4320 Basic Composition
Prerequisite: MUTH 2391 or consent of instructor. A study of methods and styles of musical compositions written by students. Various methods of beginning an original composition are discussed and demonstrated in addition to lectures and demonstrations on the small forms of composition. Students have the opportunity to apply prior theory knowledge and receive individual attention. Three credit hours.

MUTH 4340 Jazz Composition
Prerequisite: MUTH 3330 or consent of instructor. In this course, students write original compositions in the jazz idiom for varied media. Three credit hours.

MUTH 4190, 4290, 4390 Special Studies
Prerequisite: consent of music chairperson. Special individual or group research in music theory. One, two, or three credit hours.

MUTH 4230 Advanced Composition
Prerequisites: MUTH 2391, 4320, consent of instructor and approval of chair. Individual study of methods and styles of musical composition. May be repeated for credit. Two credit hours.

NPLS – Nonprofit Leadership Studies

NPLS 1100 Introduction to Nonprofit Professional Studies
The course provides an introduction to the nonprofit or third sector in the US with an emphasis on the historical and philosophical foundations of youth and human service organizations. Topics covered include the roles of nonprofit organizations in meeting human service needs, philanthropic structure of nonprofit organizations, importance of a mission orientation for nonprofit organizations, and possible careers in nonprofit organizations. One credit hour.

NPLS 3300 Management of Nonprofit Agencies
Prerequisites: NPLS 1100, attendance at approved NPLS workshop, or permission of the instructor. This course is an overview of nonprofit management. Topics include board and committee development, fund-raising principles and practices, human resource development and supervision, general nonprofit management, nonprofit accounting and financial management, nonprofit marketing, program planning, and risk management. It also includes at least one group project and is required for Nonprofit Leadership Studies minors. Three credit hours.

NPLS 4310 Strategic Fund Development
This course prepares students for managing volunteers in nonprofit organizations in the 21st century. It covers reasons for volunteering; strategies for fostering volunteer/staff relationships; the components of a volunteer program; processes for planning, developing, and implementing a volunteer program; and techniques for the recruitment, orientation, training, motivation, supervision, evaluation, recognition, and retention of volunteers. Three credit hours.

NPLS 4320 Volunteer Management
This course is an introduction to the organizational components, concepts, and methods of effective strategic fund development for 501(c)(3) nonprofit organizations. This includes developing the ability to evaluate elements of fundraising communications (such as internal and external cases for support), annual giving efforts, special event viability, stewardship, and an organization’s overall fundraising plan. Three credit hours.

NPLS 4301, 4302 Internship
Prerequisites: NPLS minor, senior standing, 2.0 grade point average, and permission of the instructor. The internship requires 150 hours of supervised field experience in a nonprofit organization (50 hours for each hour of credit). It is designed to allow students to further develop their selected certification competencies and may be repeated for up to six hours of credit. Three credit hours.

NPLS 4180, 4280, 4380 Independent Study
Prerequisite: consent of NPLS director. Advanced assignments in selected areas. Three credit hours.

NPLS 4390 Special Topics
Selected topics in nonprofit professional studies. Three credit hours.

NPLS 4110 Leadership and Service Practicum
Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Students gain practical leadership and service experience in association with the Nonprofit Leadership Student Association. One credit hour.

NURS – Nursing

Lower-Level Courses in Nursing (NURS)

NURS 1201 Medication Calculations for Nursing
An elective web-based course designed to provide nursing students with an understanding of medication calculations; Provides framework for understanding calculation of medication dosages by presenting terms, symbols, forms and methods commonly practiced by healthcare providers. Two credit hours.

NURS 1300 Essential Nursing Skills
Prerequisite: Conditional admission to the nursing program. An introduction for nursing students to essential psychomotor skills and professional behaviors required for the safe practice of nursing. Emphasis is on skill mastery. Three credit hours. (2 credits theory; 1 credit lab)

NURS 1301 Medical Terminology for Nursing
An elective web-based course designed to provide an understanding of medical terminology; Provides the framework for understanding medical records by presenting terms, abbreviations, symbols, forms and formats commonly used by healthcare providers. Three credit hours.

NURS 1205 Health Promotion Across the Lifespan
Prerequisite: Unconditional admission to the nursing program; Pre- or Corequisite: NURS 1505 and BIOL 1412. The course introduces the knowledge, skills, and attitudes as they relate to the concept of Health across the lifespan. Emphasis is on nurses’ role in health risk reduction; learning needs assessment; accessing current evidence of practices to improve quality of life; collaborating with peers to develop patient centered risk assessments; and teaching plans to promote health in all life stages for individuals and families. Two credit hours.

NURS 1415 Nursing Role Transition
Prerequisites: BIOL 1411, 1412; MATH 1302 or higher; PSYC 2300 or SOCI 2300; RHET 1311, 1312; and one of the following: HIST 2311, 2312, or POLS 1310; CHEM 1400 or higher (excluding CHEM 1409); BIOL 2401 or equivalent. The course introduces LPNs, LPTNs, and paramedics to the knowledge, skills, and attitudes required for the registered nurse in patient centered care, teamwork and collaboration, evidence based practice, safety, quality improvement, and informatics. The concept of health will be explored through collaboration with peers to develop a patient centered risk assessment and teaching plan to promote health across the lifespan. Verification of mastery of essential psychomotor skills will be confirmed through completion of simulation activities. Web-based course with scheduled, mandatory class meetings. Summer term. Four credit hours.

NURS 1505 Adult Nursing I
Prerequisite: Unconditional admission to the nursing program. Pre or Corequisite: NURS 1205, BIOL 1412. An introduction to the nurse’s role in the delivery of patient centered care as a member of a multidisciplinary team with an emphasis on the growth and development in older adulthood, fundamental nursing assessment and interventions to promote functioning and comfort. Introduction to cultural considerations, pharmacology, physical and environmental safety, evidence based practice, legal/ethical principles, quality improvement, and informatics is incorporated through exemplars of chronic health problems and physical changes requiring acute or long term management. Learning activities include class and laboratory experiences in simulation, acute care, long-term care, and community settings. Five credit hours (3 credits theory; 2 credits lab).

NURS 1410 Adult Nursing II
Prerequisites: NURS 1205, NURS 1505, BIOL 1412. Builds on NURS 1505 with focus on coordination of patient centered care and the evidence base for planning priorities based on the health problem, symptoms, and patient/family beliefs and values. Exemplars include acute and chronic health problems common in middle adulthood that require multidisciplinary management. Students continue to develop nursing knowledge, skills, and attitudes in the competencies of safety, teamwork and collaboration, quality improvement, and informatics with laboratory experiences in simulation, structured health care settings, and completion of a service learning activity. Seven week course. Four credit hours (2 credits theory; 2 credits lab).

NURS 1420 Mental Health Nursing
Prerequisites for Traditional Option: NURS 1205, NURS 1505, BIOL 1412; prerequisites for Transition Option: NURS 1415. Builds on NURS 1505 with a focus on mental health/illness across the lifespan and communication with patients, families, and the health care team, including principles of conflict management. Exemplars include psychosocial assessment in acute and chronic mental illness, symptom management, and patient advocacy. Students continue to develop nursing knowledge, skills, and attitudes in the competencies of safety, quality improvement, and informatics through learning experiences in the classroom, acute care/community mental health facilities. Traditional option: Seven week course; Transition option: Summer term. Four credit hours (2 credits theory; 2 credits lab).

NURS 2199, 2299, 2399 Special Topics in Nursing
Prerequisites: NURS 1410 or NURS 1415, NURS 1420. An elective course that provides opportunity for second year nursing students to use clinical decision making and evidence based practice to explore and coordinate projects of their choosing as a health care professional in community and service learning settings. One, two, or three credit hours.

NURS 2201 Pharmacology for Nurses
Prerequisites: NURS 1505 or NURS 1415. An elective web-based nursing course presenting the essential concepts of pharmacology. Designed to promote clinical decision making and the integration of pharmacological concepts to meet health needs of individuals across the lifespan. Two credit hours.

NURS 2202 Diagnostic Studies in Nursing
Prerequisites: NURS 1505 or NURS 1415. An elective web-based nursing course presenting common laboratory and diagnostic tests and procedures commonly used in the diagnosis and treatment of common health problems. Designed to promote clinical decision making in patient preparation and education for procedures. Two credit hours.

NURS 2410 Obstetric and Reproductive Health Nursing
Prerequisites: NURS 1410 or NURS 1415, NURS 1420, and MATH 1302. Pre or Corequisite: CHEM 1400 or higher (excluding CHEM 1409). A study of the current evidence base for patient centered care during the reproductive years, with emphasis on normal child-bearing processes. Exemplars illustrating expected processes and common problems that occur during childbearing will be used to facilitate students’ application of decision making skills to prioritize care as a member of the multidisciplinary team. Students will provide patient/family discharge teaching and implement an original community teaching project to further develop skills in quality improvement and informatics. Laboratory experiences will take place in simulation, acute care and community settings. Traditional option: Seven week course; Traditional Accelerated option: Summer term. Four credit hours (2 credits theory; 2 credits lab).

NURS 2420 Pediatric Nursing
Prerequisites: NURS 1410 or NURS 1415, NURS 1420, and MATH 1302 or higher. Pre or Corequisite: CHEM 1400 or higher (excluding CHEM 1409). A study of the growth and development of infancy through adolescence within the family context. Common acute and chronic health problems that occur during childhood will be incorporated through exemplars in which students must examine the current evidence base and prioritize care as a member of the multidisciplinary team. Students will collaborate in the development of a planned change related to safety needs across developmental stages in a variety of settings. Knowledge and skills related to quality improvement and informatics as they relate to care of children will continue to develop through classroom and laboratory experiences. Laboratory experiences will take place in simulation, acute care and community settings. Traditional option: Seven week course; Traditional Accelerated option: Summer term. Four credit hours (2 credits theory; 2 credits lab).

NURS 2550 Adult Nursing III
Prerequisites: NURS 2410, NURS 2420, CHEM 1400 or higher (excluding CHEM 1409) Pre or corequisite: BIOL 2401. The focus of this course is to further develop the knowledge, skills, and attitudes related to clinical decision making in the delivery of nursing care to adults. Complex health problems will be incorporated through exemplars in which students must prioritize care as a member of the multidisciplinary team. Laboratory experiences will include simulation and managing care for groups of patients and providing leadership within the nursing team, with emphasis on provision of evidence based, patient centered care in acute care settings. Competencies of safety, quality improvement , and informatics will be incorporated in laboratory experiences. Ten weeks. Five credit hours (3 credits theory; 2 credits lab).

NURS 2350 Competency for Entry into Practice
Prerequisites: NURS 2550, CHEM 1400 or higher (excluding CHEM 1409). Pre or corequisite: BIOL 2401. The focus of this course is to support transition to the practice of nursing through synthesis of knowledge. Students will demonstrate the knowledge, skills, and attitudes in the competencies of patient centered care, evidence based practice, teamwork and collaboration, safety, quality improvement, and informatics. The competencies will be demonstrated within a structured preceptor supervised practicum, and during a practical management experience. Comprehensive review will support student readiness for the NCLEX-RN examination. Five weeks. Three credit hours (2 credits theory; 1 credit lab).

Upper-Level Courses in Nursing (NURS)

NURS 3220 Nursing Health Assessment I
Prerequisite: RN or enrolled in the final semester of an Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing (ACEN) approved associate degree or diploma program with approval of department chairperson. This course is the first in a two course sequence that focuses on client assessment. It provides the knowledge, skills, and attitudes for competency that focuses on the role of the professional nurse in performing a comprehensive health history, physical, and psychosocial assessment. A variety of assessment tools and techniques are utilized. Further focus is on data collection and accurate documentation to communicate findings to the health care team. Two credit hours.

NURS 3230 Nursing Health Assessment II
Prerequisite: Grade of C or greater in NURS 3220. This course is the second in a two course sequence that focuses on client assessment. It provides the knowledge, skills, and attitudes for competency that focuses on the role of the professional nurse in performing a comprehensive health history, physical, and psychosocial assessment. A variety of assessment tools and techniques are utilized. Further focus is on data collection and accurate documentation to communicate findings to the health care team. Students are STRONGLY encouraged to take the course immediately following NURS 3220. Two credit hours.

NURS 3305 Informatics in Nursing (Elective)
Corequisite: NURS 2550 or consent of instructor. This course explores knowledge, skills and attitudes associated with accessing, managing, and communicating information, particularly on the creation, structure, and delivery of health related information with the use of technology. Further emphasis is on the use of information technology to improve practice and support life-long learning. Seven week course. Three credit hours.

NURS 3310 Professional Nursing Role Development
Prerequisite to all other required upper level nursing courses except Nursing 3220 and 3230. The course focus is on the process of socialization into nursing as a profession. The process explores the impact of historical and current events in the development of the professional role of the nurse. Knowledge, skills, and attitudes related to QSEN competencies (EBP, T/C, QI, S, PCC, and I) in professional nursing and the BSN curriculum is included. A personal philosophy of nursing will be explored within the framework of various nursing theories. Seven week course. Three credit hours.

NURS 3350 Ethics, Legalities, and Advocacy
This course explores various ethical guidelines that inform and guide the decision making of nurses, including the framework of the American Nurses Association Code of Ethics. Emphasis is on the knowledge, skills, and attitudes included in the legal and ethical responsibilities of nurses in all aspects of care. Patient-centered care is explored from the perspective of advocating for the patient within the interdisciplinary team. Seven week course.

NURS 3420 Wellness Promotion
Corequisite: NURS 3310. Provides an overview of knowledge, skills, and attitudes inherent in the nurse’s role as educator. Emphasis is on principles of teaching and learning in diverse populations to implement evidence based practices to improve outcomes. Assessment of learning needs of patients and communities will be explored. The course will culminate with students designing an application project as an avenue for nurses to advance health. Seven-week term. Four credit hours (3 credit theory; 1 credit lab).

NURS 3430 Healthcare Economics
Corequisite NURS 3310. This course focuses on knowledge, skills, and attitudes that relate to factors affecting costs of health care. Students will research cost/benefit analyses related to quality outcomes in the business of health care. Current local, state and national health policy issues as they relate to patient centered care will be discussed from a nursing perspective. Application project will be completed. Seven week course. Four credit hours (3 credits theory; 1 credit lab ).

NURS 3440 Research and Evidenced-Based Practice in Nursing
Prerequisite: PSYC 2310 General Psyc Statistics or PSYC 2340 Statistics & Methods I or SOCI 3381 Social Statistics or STAT 2350 lntro to Stat Methods Concurrent: NURS 3310. This course provides an overview of scientific evidence integrated into nursing practice. The focus is on knowledge, skills and attitudes required for the research process, including evaluation and dissemination of best practices to improve health care outcomes. Further emphasis is on the significance of research as it contributes to the profession of nursing. Application project will be completed. Seven week course. Four credit hours (3 credits theory; 1 credit lab).

NURS 4415 Community Health Needs
Prerequisite NURS 3310. This course provides an introduction to knowledge, skills, and attitudes for community health nursing including issues related to public health and concepts of epidemiology. Emphasis is on health promotion and illness prevention or disease management of specified groups. Integrated practice project focus is on the professional nurse’s role in community assessment and development of an interventional project to meet identified community needs. Seven week course. Four credit hours (3 credits theory; 1 credit lab).

NURS 4420 Leadership and Management
Prerequisite NURS 3310. This course provides the opportunity to develop knowledge, skills and attitudes required for leadership and management in nursing. Leadership, organizational management and change theories are examined, with emphasis on conflict management, workplace diversity, resource allocation, quality and performance. The integrated practice project is designed to provide experiences to expand the application of leadership and management skills. Seven week course. Four credit hours (3 credits theory; 1 credit lab).

NURS 4430 Integration of Concepts
Prerequisite/Concurrent: NURS 4415, NURS 4420. Must be taken in the final term. Instructor approval required. The course focuses on the synthesis of the essential competencies of the RN-BSN program in a systematic and comprehensive manner in order to provide a framework for the transition to the BSN role. The essential competencies are: Quality improvement, teamwork/collaboration, patient-centered care, evidence based practice, informatics, and safety. The integrated practice project is designed to provide experiences to expand the analysis and synthesis of these competencies. Four credit hours (3 credit theory; 1 credit lab).

PADM – Public Administration

PADM 3310 Policy Process
See POLS 3310. Three credit hours.

PADM 3331 Public Administration
Prerequisite: POLS 1310 or junior standing. Trends and organization of public administration; fiscal and personnel management; administrative powers and responsibility. Three credit hours.

PADM 4313 Public Personnel Administration
Analysis of the policies, practices, and issues of public personnel administration, including recruitment and selection processes, classification and pay plans, training, career management, separation, grievances and appeals, and unionization and collective bargaining. Three credit hours.

PADM 4341 Seminar: Comparative Public Administration
Prerequisite: senior standing. A seminar survey of similarities and differences in bureaucratic structures and processes. Analysis of the organization, staffing, and role of administrative systems in contrasting social and cultural contexts of the Western and non-Western worlds. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as PADM 5341. Three credit hours.

PADM 4353 Seminar in Budgeting
Prerequisite: POLS 1310. The course covers budgeting theory and practice. Topics include budgeting as allocations, process games, rituals, history, and politics. It examines institutions and their roles in budgeting as well as current issues such as uncontrollability, balanced budgets, and variance budgeting. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as PADM 5353. Three credit hours.

PEAW – Personal Awareness

PEAW 1300 The First Year Experience
Helps students reach their educational objectives. Interactive instructional methods promote the development of critical thinking skills and positive educational values. Students 1) complete a personal assessment to enhance their understanding of communication and learning styles, lifestyle risks, and loci of control; 2) learn to identify and use appropriate resources both on campus and within the community; 3) acquire skills needed to promote study, personal wellness, goal setting and achievement; 4) develop strategies to manage money, time and stress wisely; and 5) participate in a service learning experience outside the classroom in a setting designed to foster community service. Final course grades are A, B, C, and NC. Three credit hours.

PEAW 1190 Career Planning and Life Options
A systematic approach to developing decision-making skills and an orientation to the world of work. The focal point of the course is the student and his or her goals. Emphasis is on clarifying and formulating realistic career goals and an appropriate career plan and strategy to achieve these goals. Final course grade is credit/no-credit. One credit hour.

PEAW 1310 Library Research and Resources
Basic techniques for using the library effectively. Use of information resources, including on-line catalog, computerized databases, bibliographies, and indexes. Attention to students’ individual subject needs. Three credit hours.

PEAW 1124, 2124, 3124, 4124 Practicum: Leadership Training
Designed to recognize and enhance the development of student leaders through an orientation to campus and community resources and through participation in service projects and social activities. Enrollment is restricted to students participating in official university leadership groups. Final course grade is credit/no-credit. One credit hour.

PFSL – Professional Selling

PFSL 4395 Cooperative Education I
Prerequisites: MKTG 3350, MKTG 3353 with grades of C or greater, a cumulative GPA of 2.5, and consent of a sponsoring faculty member prior to registration. The application of sales concepts and techniques in a field setting. A written project, designed in consultation with the faculty member, and a minimum of 200 hours with a participating employer during the semester are required. The exact number of weekly work hours, activities, and responsibilities are dependent on the nature of the work experience and must be specified in written agreements between the student, faculty member, and the Office of Cooperative Education. Course is offered on a credit/no credit basis only. Three credit hours.

PHIL – Philosophy

PHIL 1110 Introduction to Ethics
Overview of ethical theory and moral reasoning; case-based approach emphasizing ethical issues in business and technology. Same as IFSC 1110. One hour lecture per week. One credit hour.

PHIL 1310 Introduction to Philosophy
Prerequisite: RHET 1311. Survey of basic themes in philosophy. Addresses such fundamental concerns as the nature of morality and beauty, the reasonableness of religious conviction, the nature of persons and the existence of free will, the status of animals and the environment, the relation of mind and body, the structure of a just society, and the nature of art through discussion and analysis of readings. Three credit hours.

PHIL 1330 Introduction to Critical Thinking
An introduction to reasoning skills. Focus on the recognition of informal fallacies, the nature, use, and evaluation of arguments, and the characteristics of inductive and deductive arguments. Three credit hours.

PHIL 2320 Ethics and Society
Prerequisite: RHET 1311. Study of selected texts reflecting a variety of ethical systems from Western and non-Western literary heritages and ethical traditions. Assigned works represent several national ethical literatures, with at least one major ethical text from each of four periods (antiquity, medieval, early modern, and contemporary). Three credit hours.(ACTS Course Number PHIL 1103)

PHIL 2350 Introduction to Logic
Prerequisite: instructor consent. Introduction to deductive logic including translation of sentences into formal systems, immediate inferences, syllogisms, formal fallacies, proofs of validity, and quantification. Three credit hours.(ACTS Course Number PHIL 1003)

PHIL 3310 Theories of Knowledge
Prerequisite: PHIL 1310 or PHIL 2320 or instructor consent. Introduction to the field of epistemology. Skeptical and realist positions will be assessed by analyzing internal and external accounts of knowledge (including coherence, foundation, naturalized, and reliablist theories). The connection between epistemology and artificial intelligence will also be examined. Three credit hours.

PHIL 3312 Science and Culture
Prerequisite: PHIL 2320 or PHIL 1310 or consent of instructor. Examination of the methods, presuppositions, and implications of empirical science. Special emphasis will be given to the metaphysical assumptions that ground the scientific enterprise, and the interface between the pursuit of science and the moral interests of society. Three credit hours.

PHIL 3315 Philosophy and Narrative
This course will focus on philosophical issues relevant to one or more of the following topic areas: philosophical issues in literature and film, theories of drama and performance, the politics of narrative, and recent hermeneutical theory. Three credit hours.

PHIL 3320 Modern Philosophy
Prerequisite: PHIL 1310 or PHIL 2320, or instructor consent. This course will examine the writings of early modern philosophers (including Descartes, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, and Kant) and their influence on nineteenth century philosophers (including Hegel, Marx, and Kierkegaard). Three credit hours.

PHIL 3321 Kant & 19th Century Philosophy
Prerequisite: PHIL 1310, or PHIL 2320, or instructor consent (granted on the basis of similar preparation). This course investigates American, British and/or continental European philosophy after the eighteenth century, with an emphasis on selected major figures, works, or themes. Three credit hours.

PHIL 3322 Contemporary Philosophy
Prerequisite: PHIL 1310, PHIL 2320, or instructor consent. This course will explore major developments in twentieth and twenty-first century philosophy. The themes and central figures under investigation will vary, but special emphasis will be placed on topics of current philosophical debate as well as those that bear directly on wider contemporary concerns. Three credit hours.

PHIL 3335 Medical Ethics
Prerequisite: PHIL 1310 or PHIL 2320 or instructor consent. Analysis of ethical issues in medicine affecting patients, health-care workers, and the public. Materials drawn from medical, legal, philosophical, and psychiatric sources, addressing such issues as euthanasia, abortion, assisted suicide, involuntary commitment, resource distribution, AIDS, and health insurance. Three credit hours.

PHIL 3341 Contemporary Ethical Theory
Prerequisite: PHIL 1310, or PHIL 2320, or instructor consent (granted on the basis of similar preparation). This course examines some fundamental issues in 20th-21st century ethical theory. In addition to exploring recent defenses and criticisms of leading normative theories, the course focuses on recent work in meta-ethics-in particular, debates about moral realism and non-realism. Three credit hours.

PHIL 3345 Ancient Greek Philosophy
Prerequisite: PHIL 1310 or PHIL 2320 or instructor consent. Philosophical positions of ancient Greek philosophers (Plato, Aristotle, Epicurus, and others) and their influence on medieval philosophers (Augustine, Aquinas, Averroes, and others). Three credit hours.

PHIL 3346 Social and Political Philosophy
Prerequisite: PHIL 1310, PHIL 2320, or instructor consent. This course will survey a number of different approaches to social and political philosophy. Students will have the opportunity to investigate and consider the role of the government, the engagement of individuals within society, and the relationship between law and politics. Similarly, students will read texts from throughout the history of philosophy in an effort to gain an appreciation of the varieties of theoretical approaches to society and the state.

PHIL 3347 Philosophy of Law
Prerequisite: PHIL 2320 or PHIL 1310 or consent of instructor. Examination of topics and areas of study in jurisprudence such as the justification for coercion and punishment; the nature, moral foundation, and authority of law; liberty and freedom of expression under the law; feminist legal theory; critical race theory and other contemporary challenges. Three credit hours.

PHIL 3350 Eastern Thought
Prerequisite: 3 hours of Philosophy, or 3 hours of Religious Studies, or instructor consent. Survey of the beliefs, practices, and group structures of the major Eastern religious and social traditions (including Hinduism, Mahayana and Zen Buddhism, Shintoism, and Confucianism). Three credit hours.

PHIL 3360 Philosophy of Religion
Prerequisite: 3 hours of Philosophy, or 3 hours of Religious Studies, or instructor consent. Major issues in the philosophy of religion including the knowledge of God, the problem of evil, life after death, religious language and experience, and the relationship of faith and reason. Three credit hours.

PHIL 3370 Existentialism
Prerequisite: introductory philosophy course or instructor consent. Survey of the existential philosophers of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries including Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Heidegger, Sartre, Camus, Jaspers, Marcel, and Tillich. Three credit hours.

PHIL 3372 Philosophy and the Arts
This course investigates influential historical and/or contemporary contributions to aesthetics, philosophy of the arts, and philosophy of arts criticism. Topics may include: the nature of art and beauty; principles of criticism, standards of taste, and uniquely correct interpretations; the nature of an appropriate response to an artwork; the reality of aesthetic properties; and the relations between art, morality, and emotion. Three credit hours.

PHIL 3375 Environmental Philosophy
Prerequisite: PHIL 1310, PHIL 2320, or instructor consent. This course explores key texts and themes within the field of Environmental Philosophy. It will explore a variety of questions concerning the relationship between human beings and the natural world. Such questions may include, but are not limited to: what constitutes nature, what the relationship is between humanity and our environment, and what our obligations are toward non-human animals and natural habitats.

PHIL 4333 Feminist Theory
This course will study major issues in feminist theory, including historical and contemporary debates, and seeks a broad understanding of the development of various strands of feminist thought and the resulting range of interpretive possibilities. It may include explorations of feminist perspectives on epistemology, metaphysics, social and political theory, and ethics, as well as race, class, sexuality, and nationality. Three credit hours.

PHIL 4350 Classical Political Theory
Prerequisite: POLS 1310 or junior standing. Major political ideas and doctrines of political thinkers from Plato to Montesquieu, with emphasis on the contributions of each to the theory and practice of government. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as POLS 5380. Three credit hours.

PHIL 4360 Modern Political Theory
[See course description for POLS 4390 Modern Political Theory.]

PHIL 4373 Philosophy of Race
This course is an introduction to the philosophy of race and ethnicity. It will explore the philosophical assumptions behind concepts of race, including: 1) historical origins and contemporary views of race and racial identities; 2) the intersection of racism and other forms of oppression; or 3) race in the history of philosophy.

PHIL 4280, 4380 Topics in Philosophy
Feminism, philosophy of art, metaphysics, and race theory are possible topics. Topics and course offering varies on demand. Two or three credit hours.

PHIL 4385 Seminar in History of Philosophy
Prerequisites: Phil 1310 and PHIL 2320 or Instructor Consent. This seminar allows participants to pursue intensive study of a pivotal movement or central figure in the history of philosophy or the development of a particular idea. Topics may include Plato, Hellenistic Philosophy, Stoicism, Skepticism: Ancient and Modern, German Idealism, Marx and Marxism, Rationalism, Logical Positivism, Analytic Philosophy, or Post-structuralism. Three credit hours.

PHIL 4386 Seminar in Social/Political Philosophy
Prerequisites: Phil 1310 and PHIL 2320 or Instructor Consent. This seminar allows participants to pursue intensive study of a pivotal movement or central figure in the history of philosophy or the development of a particular idea. Topics may include Plato, Hellenistic Philosophy, Stoicism, Skepticism: Ancient and Modern, German Idealism, Marx and Marxism, Rationalism, Logical Positivism, Analytic Philosophy, or Post-structuralism. Three credit hours.

PHIL 4388 Seminar in Metaphysics / Epistemology
Prerequisites: Phil 1310 and PHIL 2320 or Instructor Consent. This seminar course offers an opportunity to either explore in greater depth a topic within metaphysics or epistemology that has been introduced in other courses offered by the department or explore a topic that is not covered in other regularly offered courses. Three credit hours.

PHIL 4387 Seminar in Moral Philosophy
Prerequisites: Phil 1310 and PHIL 2320 or Instructor Consent. This seminar course offers an opportunity to either explore in greater depth a topic within moral philosophy that has been introduced in other courses offered by the department or explore a topic that is not covered in other regularly offered courses. Three credit hours.

PHIL 4290, 4390 Independent Study
Prerequisites: senior standing, 15 hours of philosophy, consent of instructor. Selective reading and written project on a topic submitted by the student and approved by the instructor before registration. Open only to students with demonstrated ability to write research papers of superior quality in philosophy. Applicants unknown to the instructor should submit academic transcripts and samples of their research papers in philosophy. Two or three credit hours.

PHYS – Physics

PHYS 1310 Physical Concepts
Prerequisite: MATH 0301 or equivalent. A one-semester course for students in programs of the health related professions. An introduction to the concepts of mechanics, properties of matter, heat, sound, electricity and magnetism, light, and atomic and nuclear physics. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

PHYS 1110 Physical Concepts Laboratory
Corequisite or prerequisite: PHYS 1310. Designed to examine some experimental aspects of topics discussed in PHYS 1310. Two hours laboratory. One credit hour.

PHYS 1321 College Physics I
Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in MATH 1302 or MATH 1401. Introduction to the fundamental principles underlying the foundations of classical and modern physics, including kinematics, Newtonian mechanics, fluids, thermodynamics, simple harmonic motion, and wave motion. An algebra-based course designed for majors in the life sciences, pre-professional students, and engineering technology students, but is open to any student who meets the prerequisites. Three hours lecture, one hour optional discussion. Three credit hours. (ACTS Course Number PHYS 2014)

PHYS 1121 College Physics I Laboratory
Prerequisite concurrent: PHYS 1321. Two hours laboratory covering topics In PHYS 1321. Students explore concepts and principles using laboratory skills of inquiry, measuring techniques, mathematical analysis, graphing, and modeling. One credit hour. (ACTS Course Number PHYS 2014)

PHYS 1322 College Physics II
Prerequisite: PHYS 1321 with a grade of C or better. Continuation of PHYS 1321, including topics of electricity, magnetism, electromagnetism, electromagnetic radiation, geometric and physical optics, and selected topics from modern physics, including radioactivity. Three hours lecture, one hour optional discussion. Three credit hours. (ACTS Course Number PHYS 2024)

PHYS 1122 College Physics II Laboratory
Prerequisite concurrent: PHYS 1322. Two hours laboratory covering topics in PHYS 1322. Students explore concepts and principles using laboratory skills of inquiry, measuring techniques, mathematical analysis, graphing, and modeling. One credit hour. (ACTS Course Number PHYS 2024)

PHYS 2321 Physics for Scientists and Engineers I
Prerequisite: MATH 1304 or 1451. A calculus-based introduction to the fundamental principles underlying classical physics and modern physics and the applications of those principles in science and engineering. Three hours of lecture and one hour optional discussion. Three credit hours. (ACTS Course Number PHYS 2034)

PHYS 2121 Physics for Scientists and Engineers I Laboratory
Prerequisite or corequisite: PHYS 2321. Two hours laboratory. One credit hour. (ACTS Course Number PHYS 2034)

PHYS 2322 Physics for Scientists and Engineers II
Prerequisites: PHYS 2321 and MATH 1305 or 1452. Continuation of PHYS 2321 for students majoring in physics, astronomy, chemistry, computer science, engineering, geology, information science, mathematics, and systems engineering. Topics include electricity, magnetism, optics, relativity, and quantum physics. Three hours of lecture and one hour optional discussion. Three credit hours. (ACTS Course Number PHYS 2044)

PHYS 2122 Physics for Scientists and Engineers II Laboratory
Prerequisite or corequisite: PHYS 2322. Two hours laboratory. One credit hour. (ACTS Course Number PHYS 2044)

PHYS 2391 Cooperative Education Work Experience I
Prerequisite: consent of department chairperson. Corequisites: PHYS 1321, 1121 or PHYS 2321, 2121. Designed to enhance college education through career exploration in astronomy, engineering physics, or physics. A minimum of nine hours work per week. Exact number of hours will depend on the nature of the work experience and will be specified by a contract. Three credit hours.

PHYS 3123 Physics for Scientists and Engineers III Laboratory
Prerequisite or corequisite: PHYS 3323. Three hours laboratory. One credit hour.

PHYS 3315 Teaching Physics in the Secondary School
Prerequisite: consent of instructor. A study of physics laboratory experiments and demonstrations available for secondary school physics courses. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

PHYS 3323 Physics for Scientists and Engineers III
Prerequisites: PHYS 2322 or 1322 and MATH 2306, 1452 or 2453. A continuation of topics in relativity and quantum physics introduced in PHYS 2322 or 1322 for students majoring in physics, astronomy, chemistry, computer science, engineering, geology, information science, mathematics, and systems engineering. Three hours of lecture and one hour optional discussion. Three credit hours.

PHYS 3330 Medical Physics
Prerequisites: PHYS 1321, 1322 or 2321, 2322. The applications of the concepts, methods, and principles of physics to the diagnosis and treatment of human disease. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

PHYS 3130 Medical Physics Laboratory
Prerequisite or corequisite: PHYS 3330. Approximately 18 hours of hospital time supplemented by laboratory work in the Physics Department. Three hours laboratory. One credit hour.

PHYS 3350 Electronics
Prerequisites: PHYS 2322, or 1322 and consent of the instructor. An introduction to digital circuit concepts and basic systems. Digital measurements, switching concepts and logic, flip-flops and multivibrators, counters and registers, digital and analog digital systems. Nine hours laboratory. Three credit hours.

PHYS 3391 Cooperative Education Work Experience II
Prerequisites: major in physics, junior standing, and consent of department chairperson. Further work experiences to enhance college education through an internship in astronomy, engineering physics, or physics. A minimum of nine hours work per week. The exact number of hours will depend on the nature of the work experience and will be specified by a contract. Three credit hours.

PHYS 4190 Seminar
Presentation of selected papers by students, faculty members, and invited speakers at weekly departmental meetings. Discussions, analysis, and implications of theoretical and experimental studies in the physical sciences. One hour. One credit hour.

PHYS 4111, 4112 Advanced Laboratory I
Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Advanced experiments to acquaint the student with the problems and techniques of research activities. Equipment such as a 12- inch computer-controlled telescope with electronic camera, a 17-inch heliostat, and audio spectrum analyzers are available for student use. The advanced laboratory exposes the student to modern research techniques and provides many traditional laboratory experiences. Three to six hours of laboratory. One or two credit hours.

PHYS 4112, 4212 Advanced Laboratory II
Prerequisite: PHYS 4111 or 4112. Continuation of PHYS 4111 or 4112. Three to six hours laboratory. One or two credit hours.

PHYS 4100, 4200, 4300 Independent Study
Prerequisite: consent of chairperson. Individual research by the advanced student. Topics determined on the basis of faculty interests and availability. One to three hours per credit hour. Exact time and nature of the experience will depend on the particular subject of the independent study and will be agreed on at the beginning of the term by the student and the instructor. One, two, or three credit hours.

PHYS 4310 Statistical Thermodynamics
Prerequisites: PHYS 2322, 3323. A microscopic, unified approach to thermodynamics and statistical mechanics with applications to ideal gases, including blackbody radiation and conduction electrons, magnetic systems, the Debye model, and chemical and phase equilibria. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as PHYS 5310. Three hours lecture, one hour optional discussion. Three credit hours.

PHYS 4311 Classical Mechanics
Prerequisites: PHYS 2321, MATH 2306 or 1452, or consent of the instructor. Concepts of Newtonian mechanics, dynamics of particles and systems of particles, gravitation, vector analysis, dynamics of rigid bodies, moving coordinate systems, continuous media, small oscillations, and the methods of Lagrange and Hamilton. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as PHYS 5311. Three hours lecture, one hour optional discussion. Three credit hours.

PHYS 4321 Electromagnetism I
Prerequisite: PHYS 2322. Includes the Coulomb and Gauss laws, the Poisson and Laplace equations and solutions in several coordinate systems, electric and magnetic energy, AC and DC circuits, Ampere’s and Faraday’s laws, the vector potential, Maxwell’s equations, and the propagation of electromagnetic waves. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as PHYS 5321. Three hours lecture, one hour optional discussion. Three credit hours.

PHYS 4322 Electromagnetism II
Prerequisite: PHYS 4321. Continuation of PHYS 4321. Three hours lecture, one hour optional discussion. Three credit hours.

PHYS 4330 Mathematical Methods in the Physical Sciences
Prerequisite: MATH 2306 or 1452. Review of vector calculus, differential equations of physics, and techniques of solution. Fourier series, statistics, probability, error theory, partial differentiation, and functions of a complex variable. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as PHYS 5330. Three hours lecture, one hour optional discussion. Three credit hours.

PHYS 4340 Solid State Physics
Prerequisite: PHYS 3323. Structure of crystals, dispersion relations, specific heat, phonons, electric and magnetic properties of insulators and metals, band theory of metals, insulators and semiconductors, superconductivity. Three hours lecture, one hour optional discussion. Three credit hours.

PHYS 4350 Quantum Mechanics I
Prerequisite: PHYS 3323. Concepts and history of quantum mechanics, experimental basis, the uncertainty principle, the Schrodinger equation with applications to simple systems, the hydrogen atom, perturbation theory, the interpretations of quantum mechanics, symmetry principles. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as PHYS 5350. Three hours lecture, one hour optional discussion. Three credit hours.

PHYS 4360 High Energy and Nuclear Physics
Prerequisite: PHYS 3323. Properties of the nuclei, nuclear structure and stability, quark-gluon structure of hadrons, thermodynamics of large ensembles of hadrons, nuclear reactions, instrumentation and accelerators. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as PHYS 5360. Three hours lecture, one hour optional discussion. Three credit hours.

PHYS 4370 Advanced Theoretical Physics
Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Topics vary with the experience and interests of students. Some possible topics are scattering of waves, plasma physics, atmospheric physics, fluid dynamics, and quantum optics. Three hours lecture, one hour optional discussion. Three credit hours.

PHYS 4380 Wave Motion and Optics
Prerequisite: PHYS 2322. The wave equation and solutions, wave propagation, coherence, interference, diffraction, polarization, refraction and reflection, dispersion, the interactions of light with matter, Huygens’ principle, optical instruments, quantum optics. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as PHYS 5380. Three hours lecture, one hour optional discussion. Three credit hours.

PHYS 4289, 4389, 4489 Undergraduate Research
Prerequisites: consent of department chairperson, junior or senior standing, compliance with approved guidelines (available from chairperson). Trains the student to analyze, plan and conduct experimental work on a research problem. Frequent conferences and a study of research literature with a final report are required. May extend over two semesters. Four to six hours per week for each hour of credit earned. Exact hourly commitment per week will depend on the nature of the project and will be agreed on in advance by the student and the instructor. Two, three, or four credit hours.

PHYS 4199, 4299, 4399, 4499 Special Topics
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Advanced, specialized topics of current interest in physics and astronomy. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog at the 5000-level. One, two, three, or four hours of lecture or equivalent per week. One, two, three, or four credit hours.

POLS – Political Science

POLS 1310 American National Government
An introduction to the political institutions, processes, and patterns of the national government of the United States, focusing on the Congress, presidency, and courts, and on their interrelationships. Attention is given to suffrage and elections, political parties, interest groups, and public opinion. Significant issues and problems of national policy such as civil rights and civil liberties are considered. Three credit hours. (ACTS Course Number PLSC 2003)

POLS 2301 Introduction to Political Science
Introduction to social science concepts as applied to political analysis. Analysis of individuals, groups, and society, particularly the study of social, economic, and political structures and behavior. Introduction to the discipline of political science as a social science, including enduring questions about politics, nature of political analysis, major theoretical and empirical approaches, and critiques of the discipline. Three credit hours.

POLS 2330 Introduction to Sustainability
This interdisciplinary course introduces students to the concept of sustainability and the greatest sustainability challenges of our time related to natural, social, built, and managed systems. Students will study each module in class, prepare a research presentation related to one topic module, and participate in a community engagement service learning project related to one module. The course will challenge students to take action toward increased personal sustainability and responsibility. Three hours lecture, Three credit hours. Cross-listed as MGMT 2330 and CNMG 2330.

POLS 3101 Seminar in Political Science
[See course description for POLS 3301 Seminar in Political Science ]

POLS 3201 Seminar in Political Science
[See course description for POLS 3301 Seminar in Political Science ]

POLS 3300 American Political Parties
Prerequisite: POLS 1310 or junior standing. The nature, function, and history of political parties in the United States and the process by which the will of the electorate is applied to public problems through suffrage, nominations, campaigns, and elections. Three credit hours.

POLS 3301 Seminar in Political Science
Prerequisite: POLS 1310 or junior standing. Special problems, issues, or trends in the theory and practice of politics and government. May be repeated with a change of subject and permission of department chairperson. One, two, or three credit hours.

POLS 3302 Methods of Political Inquiry
Introduction to basic research methods in empirical political analysis. Research design in political science; data collection techniques; data analysis and hypothesis testing; statistics and computer use for political science. Three credit hours.

POLS 3303 American State and Local Government
Problems of state and local government; the party system in the state; organization, functions, and powers of the legislative, executive, and judicial branches of the state government; organization and operation of county, city, village, and township government in the United States; emphasizes the effect of federalism on American state and local governments. Three credit hours.

POLS 3304 Qualitative Methods in Political Science
An introduction to qualitative research in political science, including examination of research design, question selection, literature reviews, and methods of gathering, coding, and analyzing information. Three credit hours.

POLS 3305 Elections and Public Opinion
Prerequisite: POLS 1310 or junior standing. The roles of elections and public opinion within the democratic system are thoroughly analyzed, with emphasis on factors leading to different electoral behavior and opinions within the public. Three credit hours.

POLS 3310 Policy Process
Prerequisite: POLS 1310 or junior standing. Surveys alternative approaches for analyzing policy making, the political and institutional context affecting the policy process, and selected public policies and decisions. Three credit hours.

POLS 3320 The American Presidency
Prerequisite: POLS 1310 or junior standing. Powers, duties, and responsibilities of our greatest executive officer, centering on historic and contemporary conceptions of the office; the presidency as an administrative institution. Three credit hours.

POLS 3325 Legislative Process and Behavior
Prerequisite: POLS 1310 or junior standing. Legislative politics in the United States Congress: socialization; role of party, constituency, and legislative institutions as they affect legislative behavior and public policy. Three credit hours.

POLS 3331 Public Administration
Prerequisites: POLS 1310 or junior standing. Trends and organization of public administration, fiscal and personnel management, administrative powers, and responsibility. Cross-listed with PADM 3331. Three credit hours.

POLS 3338, 3339 Cooperative Education in Political Science I & II
Prerequisites: declared major in political science; POLS 1310; and at least one upper-level course in political science, basic computer literacy, and consent of the department’s cooperative education coordinator. POLS 3303 is strongly recommended but not required. Cooperative Education in Political Science is designed to give a student majoring in the discipline an educationally applied field work learning experience. A maximum of six hours of Cooperative Education may be taken in the major. Three credit hours.

POLS 3348 Internship I
Prerequisites: at least 45 hours of completed work and permission of the instructor. Public service learning in an applied setting. Provides undergraduate students interested in politics and government with practical governmental experience. Students, through the writing of a primary internship paper and the attendance at periodic intern seminars, synthesize practical and theoretical learning in government, politics, and law. Three credit hours.

POLS 3350 Arkansas Government and Politics
Prerequisite: POLS 1310 or junior standing. A study of contemporary politics and government of Arkansas with a brief introduction to the state’s political history and a concentration on the twentieth-century experience. Topics include elections, the constitution, organization of Arkansas state and local government, and the operation of the executive, legislative, and judicial branches. Three credit hours.

POLS 3360 Comparative Government: Western
Prerequisite: POLS 1310 or junior standing. The structure, powers, and principles of the national governments of the leading European nations, including the former Soviet republics, in contrast with one another and the United States. The course also includes Canada. Three
credit hours.

POLS 3365 The European Union
This course examines the structures and functions of European governance, both at the nation-state and at the EU level, and tackles some of the concepts behind, impediments to, and consequences of, European integration in both theory and form. Students will become familiar with the politics of both large and small member states and how these politics are reflected in governance at the EU level. Three credit hours.

POLS 3370 Comparative Politics: Developing Areas
Prerequisite: POLS 1310 or junior standing. An examination of the major themes and practical problems central to third world politics such as development, state-society relations and change. A general focus on cases from Africa, Asia and Latin America will help ground thematic discussions. POLS 3360 is recommended as background. Three credit hours.

Pols 3380 Seminar in Comparative Politics
Prerequisite: POLS 1310 or junior standing. Special problems, issues, or trends in the study of comparative politics. May be repeated with a change of subject and permission of the department chairperson. Three credit hours.

POLS 3390 American Political Thought
Prerequisite: POLS 1310 or junior standing. The lives and ideas of leading political thinkers of the United States from the colonial period to the present. Three credit hours.

POLS 4100, 4200, 4300 Independent Study
Prerequisites: senior standing, 15 credit hours of political science, consent of instructor. Advanced study and research. The student should prepare a prospectus before applying for independent study. One, two, or three credit hours.

POLS 4301 Judicial System and Process
A survey of state, local, and federal judicial systems and their interrelationships. Examines judicial structure, functions, and decision-making procedures. Three credit hours.

POLS 4302 Law and Society
An examination of the origins and history of law in society, including the evolving roles of judges, juries, defense attorneys, and prosecutors. Examines the evolution of civil and criminal law, the adversary system, and the concept of justice. Three credit hours.

POLS 4308 Topics in Urban Studies
In-depth analysis of selected urban topics and themes. Course emphasizes multidisciplinary nature of urban issues and various approaches used to characterize, investigate and understand urban phenomena. May be repeated for credit with a change of subject and permission of the department chairperson. Cross-listed as URST 4308. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as POLS 5308.

POLS 4310 Seminar in American National Government
Prerequisite: senior standing. Research seminar dealing with selected phases of politics and government in the United States. It gives students the opportunity to bring analytical skills and substantive knowledge gained in prior courses to bear on a selected topic of importance, and will involve a substantial writing project. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as POLS 5310. Three credit hours.

POLS 4315 Capitol Hill Seminar
An introduction to politics and government in Washington, DC politics. Through meetings with Washington decision-makers from the three branches of government, the major governmental linkage institutions and lobbyists, congressional staffers, members of the media, think tanks, and political analysts, the course facilitates understanding of the theoretical and practical worlds of American politics from an insider, Capitol Hill, perspective. Three credit hours.

POLS 4320 American Foreign Policy
Prerequisite: POLS 1310 or junior standing. Examines the goals and motivation of American foreign policy and relations, the actors and processes that shape policies and decisions, and selected foreign policy problems and issues. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as POLS 5320. Three credit hours.

POLS 4333 Seminar in State Politics
Research seminar dealing with selected aspects of state politics such as comparative policy making, political culture variations, and problem solving. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as POLS 5333. Three credit hours.

POLS 4340 International Relations
Prerequisite: POLS 1310 or junior standing. Provides a conceptual foundation for understanding and analyzing the international system, states, and actors. Examines economic, political, and military aspects of national security, power, and national interest, and patterns of national decision making. Three credit hours.

POLS 4341 Seminar in International Relations
Special problems, issues, or trends in the study of international relations. May be repeated with a change of subject and permission of the department chairperson. Three credit hours.

POLS 4343 Seminar in Local Politics
Research seminar dealing with selected aspects of local politics such as community power structure, local autonomy, and comparative administration. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as POLS 5343. Three credit hours.

POLS 4345 The Clinton Presidency
Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. The presidency of Bill Clinton from several perspectives, all grounded in the discipline of political science: the administration’s policy making; presidential power and leadership; crises and turning points in the Clinton administration; campaigning and communications skill of the president; relations with the press, political parties and groups; and the legacy of the Clinton presidency. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as POLS 5345. Three credit hours.

POLS 4348 Internship II
Prerequisite: Senior standing and permission of the instructor. A public service learning experience which gives students the opportunity to blend practical concepts learned on the job with their academic course work in political science. Students attend periodic seminars and participate in a substantial writing assignment aimed at fully integrating and synthesizing their public service experience. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as POLS 5348. Three credit hours.

POLS 4350 Constitutional Law: Governmental Powers
Prerequisite: POLS 1310 or junior standing. The Supreme Court as a political institution in American democracy. Analysis of leading constitutional decisions exploring judicial review, federalism, separation of powers, regulation of commerce, due process, and equal protection. The dynamics of Supreme Court decision-making. Three credit hours.
POLS 4351 Constitutional Law: Civil Liberties
Prerequisite: POLS 1310 or junior standing. Civil liberties; analysis of leading constitutional decisions focusing on human freedom and fundamental rights. Emphasis on religious liberty, freedom of expression, racial equality, privacy, criminal procedures, and the dynamics of Supreme Court decision making. Three credit hours.

POLS 4355 Urban Planning and Land Use
A view of urban planning and land use from critical, analytical urban studies perspective. The course inquires into the meaning of planning for communities and cities. Course uses case studies to explore positive and negative impacts of planning technique and professionalism. Considers historical and modern alternatives to planning and subsequent land use and how urban planning and land use relate to quality of urban life. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as POLS 5355. Three credit hours.

POLS 4356 Urban Policy and Government
Course explores urban policy-making and urban government from a critical, analytical urban studies perspective. Considers historical and modern variations of urban government and intergovernmental relations and how this relates to urban policy making, political will and quality of urban life issues.Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as POLS 5356. Three credit hours.

POLS 4360 Selected Topics in Political Science
Prerequisite: senior standing. The seminar provides students the opportunity to bring analytical skills and substantive knowledge gained in prior courses to bear on a selected topic of special importance, and will involve a substantial writing project. Students should inquire at the department for the topic that will be addressed in a given semester. Three credit hours.

POLS 4370 Readings in Political Science
Prerequisite: senior standing. In this readings seminar several outstanding books, including classics and notable current works, are assigned for analysis and discussion. The course is designed to give students an opportunity to consider fundamental themes that perennially concern the discipline: the nature of power, politics, and governance. Three credit hours.

POLS 4375 Politics of the Middle East
The course covers the politics and political dynamics of the Middle East, introducing the student to the main issues and actors (state and non-state) of the contemporary Middle East. The course explores the nature of contemporary politics in the region including the impact of the complex relationships among great power intervention, economics, ethnicity, nationalism, and religion. Three credit hours.

POLS 4376 Global Terrorism
The course will cover history, contemporary nature and defense against terrorism, with a particular emphasis on post 09/11 “war on terror.” Three credit hours.

POLS 4380 Classical Political Theory
Prerequisite: POLS 1310 or junior standing. Major political ideas and doctrines of political thinkers from Plato to Montesquieu, with emphasis on the contributions of each to the theory and practice of government. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as POLS 5380. Three credit hours.

POLS 4387 Great Decisions in American Foreign Policy
Prerequisites: POLS 1310, HIST 2311, or junior standing. Examines eight current foreign policy issues. Explores the origin of each issue, alternative proposals and strategies for American foreign policy, other nations’ proposals and strategies, and the consequences of past and current international problems for the United States and the world community. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as POLS 5387. Three credit hours.

POLS 4390 Modern Political Theory
Prerequisite: POLS 1310 or junior standing. A continuation of POLS 4380; from Edmund Burke to the present, with emphasis on the more recent political theories and systems of democracy, communism, and socialism. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as POLS 5390. Three credit hours.

POLS 4395 Seminar in Political Science Research
Special problems, issue, or trends in the study of politics. The course will involve student participation in conducting political science research. May be repeated with a change of subject and permission of department chairperson. Three credit hours.

POLS 4397 Social Studies Teaching Applications
A link between social studies content with practical applications for classroom instruction. Content information comes from history, geography, political science, sociology/anthropology, and psychology. Modeled for prospective secondary education teachers to illustrate how content can be applied in the classroom. Critical components of each of the disciplines integrated into the content presentations and the demonstrated applications. Team taught. Same as GEOG and HIST 4397. Three credit hours.

POLS 4399 Undergraduate Research Project
Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing, POLS 3302, 15 credit hours of political science, and consent of the instructor. Completion of a major research project in political science. The student should complete a research proposal before applying. Three credit hours.

PSYC – Psychology

PSYC 2300 Psychology and the Human Experience
Prerequisite: RHET 1311. Focuses on development of the individual in the context of physical and social environments. Topics include the scientific method and its application to the study of the individual, the relationship between brain and behavior, social and personality development, theories of motivation, maladaptive behavior, social cognition and interaction, and the effects of membership in different groups. Students learn through writing, reading, discussing, listening, and participating in critical thinking and problem-solving activities. Three credit hours. (ACTS Course Number PSYC 1103)

PSYC 2310 General Psychological Statistics
Prerequisite: MATH 1302 or 1315 or equivalent. A general survey of statistical methods in psychology, including descriptive and inferential techniques. Emphasis on application and interpretation of the statistical procedures. Course does not fulfill requirement for psychology majors, or count toward the minimum of 31 hours of psychology courses for majors. May be useful in preparation for required statistics courses. Accepted by some majors. See program advisor for information. Three credit hours.

PSYC 2340 Statistics and Methods I
Prerequisite: MATH 1302 or 1315 or equivalent. A study of descriptive research techniques. Emphasis on design and statistical analysis of descriptive experimentation. Topics include central tendency and dispersion, probability theory, frequency distributions, percentiles, correlation and regression. Three credit hours.

PSYC 3305 Sensation-Perception
Prerequisite: PSYC 2300. Study of the perception external events and sensory processes underlying that perception. Three credit hours.

PSYC 3308 Urban Environmental Psychology
Prerequisite: PSYC 2300. Study of the effects of physical environments on individuals. Topics include individual perceptions of local environments, pollution, and energy costs; individual privacy needs versus crowding; unique environments, such as wilderness, museums, and zoos; and the design of more livable homes. Three credit hours.

PSYC 3310 Motivation and Emotion
Prerequisite: PSYC 2300. Detailed coverage of important forms of human motivation and cursory treatment of emotions. Three credit hours.

PSYC 3320 Introduction to Applied Psychology
Prerequisite: PSYC 2300. An introduction to the application of psychology to a variety of problems concerning mental and physical health, communication, motivation, the use of tests and other psychological techniques in industry and government, social engineering, environmental issues, and the legal system. Also covers careers in psychology, their educational requirements, and career planning. Three credit hours.

PSYC 3330 Health Psychology
Prerequisite: PSYC 2300. A study of the inter-relationship between psychology and health. Topics include research regarding the mind-body connection, the causes of stress and how stress impacts health, behavioral contributions to an individual’s or community’s health status, and the ways in which health is being re-conceptualized. Three credit hours.

PSYC 3340 Meditation Techniques
Theoretical framework for understanding the meditation experience, namely, Jung’s depth psychology, yoga psychology, and Buddhist psychology; training in specific meditation techniques of various religious traditions, including Hatha Yoga, Zen, and the Silence, as well as the self-analysis of dreams. Cross-listed as RELS 3340. Three credit hours.

PSYC 3341 Research Methods I
Prerequisite: PSCY 2340 with grade of “C” or greater. This course is designed as a survey of methods used in psychological research with equal treatment given to quasi experimental and experimental designs. Topics will include experiments, survey research, qualitative field research and unobtrusive research with an emphasis on the purposes, strengths and weaknesses of each. This course is required for psychology majors entering Fall 2010. Three credit hours.

PSYC 3342 Statistics and Methods II
Prerequisite: PSYC 2340 with a “C” or greater. A study of inferential research techniques, with an emphasis on the design and statistical analysis of controlled experimental procedures. Topics include sampling procedures and distributions, hypothesis testing, within and between subjects designs, tests of the difference between two means, and one-way and factorial analyses of variance. Three credit hours.

PSYC 3350 Social Psychology
Prerequisite: PSYC 2300. An introduction of theories, research, and problems regarding interrelationships of social structure, interpersonal interaction, and behavior of individuals. Topics include human aggression, prejudice, attraction, persuasion, self-perception, and conformity. Three credit hours.

PSYC 3356 Developmental Psychology
Prerequisite: PSYC 2300. Development of the individual from conception through adolescence. Topics include prenatal, intellectual, emotional, social, and personality development. Three credit hours.

PSYC 3357 Infancy
Prerequisite: PSYC 2300, 3356, or consent of the instructor. Theory and research on the psychological development of infants. Topics include sensory and perceptual development, intellectual development, social and emotional development, and physical development during the first two years of life. Three credit hours.

PSYC 3358 Adolescent Psychology
Prerequisite: PSYC 2300, 3356, or consent of instructor. Theory and research on the psychological development of adolescents; physical, social, personality, and intellectual development during adolescence; major theories concerning adolescence. Three credit hours.

PSYC 3360 Abnormal Psychology
Prerequisite: PSYC 2300. The causes, symptoms, and treatment of abnormalities in human behavior. Three credit hours.

PSYC 3363 Psychology of Religion
Prerequisite: PSYC 2300 or consent of instructor. Various interpretations of religious experience in terms of modern Western psychology and their use in religious counseling. Varieties of religious experiences, psychological interpretations of religious experiences, religion and stages of human development, and techniques of religious counseling. Three credit hours.

PSYC 3365 Fundamentals of Psychosexual Behavior
Prerequisite: PSYC 2300. The emotional, attitudinal, and developmental parameters of human sexual motivation and behavior; masculinity-femininity; sexual deviation; and prevalent sexual behaviors. Three credit hours.

PSYC 3366 Psychology of Women
Prerequisite: Psychology 2300. The study of the psychology of women, emphasizing the different views of women in our society, the bases of these views, and their implications for men and women. Three credit hours.

PSYC 3368 Psychology Cooperative Education
Prerequisites: completed 30 semester hours with a 2.50 GPA overall, PSYC 2300, six upper-level hours in psychology and consent of the psychology department coordinator and the director of cooperative education. Transfer students must have completed one semester in residence. Prerequisite or corequisite: PSYC 2340 or 2310. Designed to complement and extend the classroom learning experience through the application of psychology-based concepts, skills, and technology in a professional work environment. PSYC 3368 normally requires 200 hours per semester with the employer. Number of work hours, activities, and responsibilities depends on the nature of the work and must be specified in a written agreement coordinated with the course instructor and the Office of Cooperative Education. Grading is based on the criteria of the written agreement and is the responsibility of the instructor. Three credit hours.

PSYC 3369, 3469 Internship
Prerequisites: junior standing, consent of instructor. Provides practical experience in a professional urban setting. Students work in a business, government agency, state mental health institution, or similar location giving opportunities to apply their academic background to develop applied skills. Three or four credit hours.

PSYC 3370 Industrial Psychology
Prerequisite: PSYC 2300. A survey of the field of industrial psychology. Application of psychological principles to prediction, performance criteria, job analysis, employee evaluation, training, work environment, management, motivation, and job satisfaction. Recommended for business students and those interested in applied psychology. Three credit hours.

PSYC 3375 Psychology of Consumer Behavior
Prerequisite: PSYC 2300. Psychology of advertising; motivational, perceptual, social, and learning variables influencing consumer choice. Recommended for advertising, marketing, business, and psychology majors. Three credit hours.

PSYC 3380 Cognitive Psychology
Prerequisite: PSYC 2300. An introduction to theories and research regarding human information processing. Topics include attention, memory, problem solving, information representation, and individual differences in cognitive ability. Three credit hours.

PSYC 4100 Senior Synthesis
Prerequisite: senior standing and 18 hours in psychology, or consent of instructor. Capstone course, applying knowledge and skills from previous psychology courses. One credit hour.

PSYC 4300 Drugs and Behavior
Prerequisite: PSYC 2300, senior standing, or consent of instructor. An analysis of the effects of drug administration on ongoing behavior and learning. Emphasis on drugs of clinical application and usages. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as PSYC 5300. Three credit hours.

PSYC 4301 Drug Abuse
Prerequisite: PSYC 2300. A study of drug abuse and addiction with an emphasis on pharmacological, psychological, and behavior aspects of abused drugs. There is also an emphasis on the differing treatments used in the attempt to control these addictions. Three credit hours.

PSYC 4310 Counseling Psychology
Prerequisite: PSYC 2300, senior standing, or consent of the instructor. A survey of the field of counseling and its philosophy, with emphasis on the counseling relationship. Educational, vocational, industrial, and personal counseling are covered. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as PSYC 5310. Three credit hours.

PSYC 4320 Physiological Psychology
Prerequisite: PSYC 2300. Principal neuroanatomical structures, with emphasis on their behavioral correlates. Three credit hours.

PSYC 4221, 4321 Independent Study
Prerequisite: senior standing psychology major, consent of the professor. Readings and research in various areas of psychology. Two or three credit hours.

PSYC 4325 Personnel Psychology
Prerequisites: PSYC 2300, three hours of statistics. Analysis of industrial psychology in terms of personnel work. Topics include predictors and related issues, criteria and related issues, statistical analysis for selection and placement, testing, interviews and other non-test procedures, personnel development, and attitude measurement. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as PSYC 5325. Three credit hours.

PSYC 4330 Learning and Memory
Prerequisite: PSYC 2300. Fundamental principles of conditioning and learning. Topics include traditional and modern approaches to reinforcement, punishment, generalization, discrimination, constraints on learning, and applications of learning principles. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as PSYC 5330. Three credit hours.

PSYC 4335 Personality and Social Development
Prerequisite: PSYC 2300. Recommended: PSYC 3356. Examines the interaction between developing children and the social environment and the implications for adult personality using an Eriksonian stage model. Constitutional predispositions, parental care giving, modeling, peer interaction, and social institutions considered. Three credit hours.

PSYC 4336 Cognitive Development
Prerequisite: PSYC 2300, 3356, and senior standing or consent of the instructor. An introduction to the theories and research on the development of thinking in infants, children, and adolescents. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as PSYC 5336. Three credit hours.

PSYCH 4337 Adult Psychology and Aging
Prerequisite: PSYC 2300 with grade of C or greater. This comprehensive course focuses on typical transitional aspects of development across the adult lifespan including physical, cognitive, emotional, and social development domains. Theoretical perspectives and practical applications from psychology will be emphasized including cross-cultural, gender, ethnic, familial, historical perspectives, and temporal culture interventions. Three credit hours.

PSYC 4340 Shaping of Human Behavior
Prerequisite: PSYC 2300, and senior standing or consent of the instructor. A study of the application of principles of learning and conditioning to the shaping of the behavior of people in a variety of settings. Ethical issues in changing human behavior. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as PSYC 5340. Three credit hours.

PSYC 4345 History of Psychology
Prerequisite: PSYC 2300. An examination of concepts, methods, and systems that have contributed to the development of modern psychology. Provides excellent preparation for the Advanced Psychology GRE. Three credit hours.

PSYC 4355 Psychology of Personal Adjustment
Prerequisite: PSYC 2300. A study of the healthy personality, emphasizing characteristics, development, and promotion of mental health. Three credit hours.

PSYC 4360 Psychological Tests and Measurement
Prerequisite: PSYC 2300 with grade of C or greater, and three hours of college-level statistics. An examination of classical test theory with extensive treatments of reliability, validity, item analysis and standardization. An introduction to other scaling and test construction approaches is included. The construction and use of common psychological tests are considered. Three credit hours.

PSYC 4363 Organizational Psychology
Prerequisite: PSYC 2300 or consent of the instructor. An analysis of the interplay of individuals and the organizations for which they work. Topics include job satisfaction, motivation, morale, leadership, group dynamics, conflict, communication, union-management relations, and organizational growth and development. Three credit hours.

PSYC 4365 Psychological Disorders of Childhood
Prerequisite: PSYC 2300, and senior standing or consent of instructor. A study of the nature, causes, and treatment of disturbed behavior in children and their families. Topics include childhood psychoses, attention deficit disorder, autism, depression, behavior problems, and the abused child. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as PSYC 5365. Three credit hours.

PSYC 4370 Psychology of Personality
Prerequisite: PSYC 2300 and PSYC 3360. A critical survey of modern approaches to the organization and development of personality, with extensive reading to integrate experimental, clinical, biographical, and cultural evidence. Three credit hours.

PSYC 4380 Human Factors Psychology
Prerequisite: PSYC 2300. An analysis of relevant information about human behavior for the design of physical objects people use, the methods for their use, and the design of environments in which people live and work. Three credit hours.

PSYC 4385 Psychology and Public Health
Prerequisites: PSYC 2300, and senior standing, or consent of the instructor for undergraduates; graduate standing for graduates. Considers how psychological science and applications can help shape community health and public health efforts. Issues related to health psychology research, community psychology, preventive health, and public health practice will be considered. Will explore innovative public health models in which psychological science or applications have been prominent. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as PSYC 5385. Three credit hours.

PSYC 4290, 4390 Senior Seminar
Prerequisite: PSYC 2340 and senior status in psychology major. Topics vary with instructor. Two or three credit hours.

PSYC 4397 Social Studies Teaching Applications
A link between social studies content with practical applications for classroom instruction. Information comes from history, geography, political science, sociology/anthropology, and psychology. Content modeled for prospective secondary education teachers to illustrate how content can be applied in the classroom. Critical components of each discipline integrated into the content presentations and the demonstrated applications. Team taught. Three credit hours.

PSYC 4399 Special Topics in Psychology
Prerequisite: PSYC 2300. Advanced specialized topics of current interest in psychology. Topics vary with faculty interest and availability. With a different topic the course may be repeated for credit. Three credit hours.

PSYC 4412 Computer Applications in Psychology
Prerequisite: consent of instructor. The basic instrumentation involved in psychological research, with emphasis on the use of programming language in experimental situations and interfacing microcomputers with common laboratory equipment. Two hours lecture, four hours laboratory per week. Four credit hours.

PSYC 4450 Experimental Psychology
Prerequisites: PSYC 2300, 2340. General methodological principles and techniques of psychological experimentation. Students design, conduct, analyze, and report experiments in their areas of interest. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory. Four credit hours.

PSYC 4495 Practicum in Psychology
Prerequisites: senior standing, consent of instructor. The student will perform independent laboratory research or assist in the instructional process. Four credit hours.

PVYS – Poverty Studies

PVYS 2301 Introduction to Poverty Studies
This course serves as an introduction to a multidisciplinary study of poverty, including emphases on causes and effects of poverty, values, moral, and legal issues related to poverty, and difficulties in breaking the cycle of poverty. Three credit hours.

PVYS 2302 Poverty Reduction Strategies
Prerequisite: PVYS 2301. In response to the incidence of poverty, both in urban and rural areas, this course equips the student with analytical tools that aid in the planning, design, and implementation of anti-poverty strategies. Macro and micro approaches include individual counseling and prevention tactics, policy making, continua of care, community development, and community collaboration. The course is required for Shepherd Scholars. Three credit hours.

PVYS 3301 Service-Learning Placement I
Prerequisite: PVYS 2301, 2302 and admission to the Shepherd Scholars program. In this intensive fieldwork course, Shepherd Scholars will be placed with an agency in either an urban or rural poverty situation where they will be integrated into the work of that organization. Successful completion requires at least four weeks (160 contact hours) and both written and oral reflection presentations. Three credit hours.

PVYS 3302 Service-Learning Placement II
Similar to PVYS 3301, this course offers Shepherd Scholars with an intensive fieldwork opportunity. Students will be placed with an agency in either an urban or rural poverty situation where they will be integrated into the work of that organization. Students successfully completing PVYS 3201 may continued in that placement for this course with the approval of the program director and community mentor. Successful completion requires at least four weeks (160 contact hours) and both written and oral reflection presentations. Prerequisite: PVYS 2301,2302, and 3301 and admission to the Shepherd Scholars program. Three credit hours.

PVYS 4301 Seminar in Poverty Studies
This capstone course is conducted as a seminar in which students play a lead role along with the instructor in discussions of readings, papers, and presentations. lt is designed to challenge students to propose, research, and write a major paper on poverty and its reduction. Topics may derive from any relevant discipline and will be selected in consultation with a participating instructor who will serve as a preceptor.

RACE – Race and Ethnicity

RACE 2301 Introduction to Race and Ethnicity
This course provides an overview of the key concepts and issues in the interdisciplinary study of race and ethnicity. The course serves as an introduction to complex issues such as the social construction of race and ethnicity, white privilege, the role of media in that construction, the effect of immigration on conversations about race, individual and institutional discrimination, multiple differences and intersecting oppressions. Students will explore their own racial identities, biases, and prejudices. Course materials facilitate engagement in critical analysis of textual and statistical information from a variety of disciplinary sources. This course is required for the minor in Race and Ethnicity. Three credit hours.

HIST/RACE 4356 History of Race and Ethnicity in America
A survey of the history of race and ethnicity in the United States from prehistory to present with a special focus on selected topics in the experience of African Americans, Asian Americans, European Americans, Latino Americans, and Native Americans. Dual listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as HIST/RACE 5356. Three credit hours.

RACE 4100/4200/4300 Independent Study Race and Ethnicity
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. This course is available to students minoring in Race and Ethnicity only. For the student of superior ability who wishes to pursue research in the field. One, Two, or Three credit hours.

READ – Reading

READ 0310 College Reading
A combined lecture/reading lab course designed to improve reading vocabulary and comprehension strategies needed for success in college. Students required to take this course must complete it satisfactorily before enrolling in RHET 1312 Composition II. A, B, C, NC. Three credit hours.

READ 1310 College Study Skills
Prerequisite: READ 0310 if required. Provides practical instruction in skills needed for success and retention in college. Three credit hours.

READ 1311 Reading for Academic Content
Prerequisite: READ 0310 if required. A combination laboratory and lecture course designed for students who want practical information on improving their reading rate and comprehension. Students will be introduced to scholastic reading strategies and methods for use in their other college courses. Three credit hours.

READ 3322 Foundations of Literacy Instruction in Special Education
This course introduces special education teacher candidates to the principle of literacy development, factors affecting literacy development, and different approaches to reading instruction. Focusing on phonemicawareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary development, comprehension, and selection of appropriate materials to influence motivation for reading, teach candidates will explore instructional strategies that address struggling readers as well as high-risk learners in the context of a balanced approach to literacy instruction. Three credit hours.

READ 4322 Literacy Assessment of Students with Special Needs
Prerequisite: READ 3322. This course provides candidates with the knowledge of current concepts and issues associated with literacy assessment ranging from kindergarten to grade twelve for students with special needs. Focusing on appropriate selection, administration, and interpretation of curriculum-based assessments, authentic assessments, and standardized reading assessments, candidates also will explore connections between referral and IEP processes, and RTI with attention to research-based intervention reading strategies embedded in field activities. Three credit hours.

RELS – Religious Studies

RELS 2305 World Religions
Prerequisite: RHET 1311 recommended. Examines the global patterns of contemporary world religions as symbol systems and expressions of discrete, coherent world views. Three credit hours.

RELS 2333 Introduction to Religious Studies
An introduction to the study of religion. The theme may vary, but the course will highlight central issues that arise in studying religion from the academic standpoint-for example: the definition of religion, its characteristic features and functions, the “insider” vs. “outsider” perspective, the challenges that arise in comparing religions, and attempts to explain the origin of religion. Three credit hours.

RELS 3320 Christianity
Prerequisite: RELS 2305 or consent of instructor. A survey of major developments in the history of Christian thought from its origins in the New Testament through the Protestant Reformation. Three credit hours.

RELS 3330 Religious Countercultures
A cross-cultural survey of sects and cults throughout history, emphasizing contemporary groups in America. Examination of relevant issues concerning cults; the definitions of sect and cult; the relationship between cults and main line religions; brainwashing, deprogramming, government regulation. Same as ANTH 3366. Three credit hours.

RELS 3333 Reading Sacred Texts
This course is designed to provide both an opportunity to examine the texts of a particular religious tradition in detail and to introduce students to interdisciplinary methods for interpreting such texts. Three credit hours.

RELS 3336 Islam
Prerequisite: RELS 2305 or consent of instructor. An examination of the role of Islam as the primary cohesive element in the social, political, and cultural development of the modern Middle East. Comparison and contrast of Western and Middle Eastern perspectives on relevant current issues. Same as HIST 3336. Three credit hours.

RELS 3338 Religion and Modern South Asia
The role of religion (Hinduism, Buddhism, Islam, Christianity) in the formulation of South Asian responses to the processes of Anglicization, Westernization, and Modernization. Same as HIST 3338. Three credit hours.

RELS 3340 Meditation Techniques
Theoretical framework for understanding the meditation experience, namely, Jung’s depth psychology, yoga psychology, and Buddhist psychology; training in specific meditation techniques of various religious traditions, including Hatha Yoga, Zen, and the Silence, as well as the self-analysis of dreams. Three credit hours. Cross-listed as PYSC 3340.

RELS 3350 Eastern Thought
Prerequisite: 3 hours of Philosophy, or 3 hours of Religious Studies, or instructor consent. Survey of the beliefs, practices, and group structures of the major Eastern religious and social traditions (including Hinduism, Mahayana and Zen Buddhism, Shintoism, and Confucianism). Three credit hours.

RELS 3360 Philosophy of Religion
Prerequisite: 3 hours of Philosophy, or 3 hours of Religious Studies, or instructor consent. Major issues in the philosophy of religion including the knowledge of God, the problem of evil, life after death, religious language and experience, and the relationship of faith and reason. Three credit hours.

RELS 3363 Psychology of Religion
See PSYC 3363. Three credit hours.

RELS 3370 Judaism
Prerequisite: RELS 2305 or consent of instructor. A survey of major developments in the history of Jewish thought from its origins in the Hebrew Bible through the present. Three credit hours.

RELS 4180, 4280, 4380 Topics in Religion
Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Analysis of selected issues in religious studies. Course content will change. For descriptive title of the content, refer to the semester class schedule. One, two, or three credit hours.

RELS 4313 Apocalypse Now…and Then: A History of Apocalyptic Thought and Movements
See HIST 4313.

RELS 4315 Religious History of the United States
See HIST 4315.

RELS 4321 Religion, Society, and Culture
Introduction to the role of shamans, witches, diviners, cultic and magic belief systems, function of myth, ritual, religious symbolism, meaning of spirit possession, revitalization, and ancestor worship in tribal, peasant, and modern societies. Same as ANTH 4321. Three credit hours.

RELS 4180, 4280, 4380 Topics in Religion
Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Analysis of selected issues in religious studies. Course content will change. For descriptive title of the content, refer to the semester class schedule. One, two, or three credit hours.

RELS 4385 Seminar in Major Religions
This course provides for a more in-depth examination of a particular religious tradition. The tradition is typically non-Western and varies by semester. Check with the department for details. Three credit hours.

RELS 4290, 4390 Independent Study
Prerequisites: consent of instructor, see philosophy website for independent study guidelines. Selective reading and a formal written project on a topic submitted by the student and approved by the instructor at a conference in advance of registration. Open only to students with demonstrated ability to write research papers of superior quality in religious studies. Applicants unknown to the instructor should submit academic transcripts and samples of their research papers in religious studies. Two or three credit hours.

RHET – Rhetoric And Writing

RHET 0310 Composition Fundamentals
Practice in writing, with an emphasis on developing fluency and editing. This course does not fulfill the core curriculum requirement and is intended for students who are not ready for RHET 1311. Institutional credit only; final grades are A, B, C, or NC. Three credit hours.

RHET 0321 Academic Literacy
Practice in academic writing and reading with an emphasis on developing strategies and skills for college success: reading and writing fluency, editing techniques, reading comprehension, and vocabulary development. This fulfills the requirement for developmental reading and writing, but doe’s not fulfill a core curriculum requirement. Institutional credit only; final grades are A, B, C, or No Credit. This is a combined lecture/lab course. Three credit hours.

RHET 1311 Composition I
Prerequisite: A minimum ACT English score of 19, a minimum SAT I verbal score of 450, or RHET 0310, or RHET 0321. Practice in writing, with an emphasis on personal, expressive writing, as well as transactional writing. Students will focus on organizing and revising ideas and writing well organized, thoroughly developed papers that achieve the writer’s purpose, meet the readers’ needs, and develop the writer’s voice. Final course grades are A, B, C, or NC. Students must complete this course with a grade of C or greater to take RHET 1312. Three credit hours. (ACTS Course Number ENGL 1013)

RHET 1312 Composition II
Prerequisite: RHET 1311 with a C or greater or equivalent. Those students required by state law to enroll in READ 0310 must successfully complete that course before enrolling in RHET 1312. Practice in writing, with an emphasis on academic forms. Students will focus on analysis, argumentation, research, and documentation writing. Final course grades are A, B, C, or NC. Three credit hours. (ACTS Course Number ENGL 1023)

RHET 1320 Honors Composition
For students with superior achievement in English. Fulfills first year composition core curriculum requirement. Admission by invitation. Three credit hours.

RHET 1110 Composition Fundamentals Writing Laboratory (The University Writing Center)
Individualized supplemental help for students enrolled in RHET 0310 or 1311. Practice in basic grammar and writing skills. May be used as a refresher course before taking RHET 1311; may be used to prepare for composition test-outs. Graded CR/NC. One credit hour.

RHET 1130 Writing on Computers (The University Writing Center)
A practical course for writers to use the computer in the composing process. Students will learn one word processing program well, integrate it into their individual writing processes, and use other software that supports writing on computers. One credit hour.

RHET 2100 Writing Laboratory (The University Writing Center)
Individualized supplemental help for students enrolled in RHET 1312 or who have completed composition courses. May be used as a refresher course. Graded CR/NC. One credit hour.

RHET 2312 Advanced Composition
Prerequisite: RHET 1312 or equivalent. A course designed to offer the student advanced practice in essay and other academic writing forms; includes review of composition modes as well as grammar and mechanics. The course is especially appropriate for returning, transfer, and other students who want or need additional writing practice in preparation for performance in upper-level coursework, or students who wish additional writing practice before entering a writing major. Three credit hours.

RHET 3200 Introduction to Professional and Technical Writing
Prerequisite: RHET 1312 or the equivalent. An introduction to the Rhetoric and Writing major and professional and technical writing theory and practice. Two credit hours.

RHET 3300 Introduction to Research
Prerequisite: RHET 1312 or the equivalent. Introduction to quantitative and qualitative research methods and the research process as applied to the study of written communication. Three credit hours.

RHET 3301 Editing for Usage, Style, and Clarity
Prerequisites: RHET 1311 and 1312 or equivalents. An introductory editing course that focuses on basic editing and proofreading skills. Course includes review of grammar, punctuation, and mechanics. Editing practice includes work with the student’s own writing as well as secondary texts. Three credit hours.

RHET 3315 Persuasive Writing
Prerequisite: RHET 1312 or the equivalent. A theoretical and practical introduction to the art of written persuasion. Emphasis on persuasive techniques and their ethical consequences. Three credit hours.

RHET 3316 Writing for the Workplace
Prerequisite: RHET 1312 or the equivalent. Study and practice of workplace communication required of professionals who write as part of their jobs. Emphasis on developing a sense of audience and purpose, writing in teams, and learning problem solving strategies. Intensive practice writing workplace documents such as memos, letters, e-mail, résumés, and reports. Three credit hours.

RHET 3317 Nonfiction
Prerequisite: RHET 1312 or the equivalent. Study and practice of nonfiction writing to explore, investigate, and explain ideas, experiences, and perspectives. Emphasis on style, voice, revision, and collaboration. Three credit hours.

RHET 3320 Contemporary Issues in Language and Rhetoric
Prerequisites: RHET 1311 and 1312 or equivalents. A study of contemporary issues in language research from rhetorical and social perspectives. Three credit hours.

RHET 3326 Technical Writing
Prerequisite: RHET 1312 or the equivalent. Intensive instruction in the theory and practice of technical communication. Emphasis on understanding audience, establishing a clear purpose, using technology, acquiring a sense of the profession, and developing strategies for successfully producing individual and collaborative documents. Practice writing genres such as reports, instructions, descriptions, specifications, and proposals. Three credit hours.

RHET 4100, 4200 Independent Study
Prerequisites: senior standing, 12 hours of upper-level RHET courses. For the student of superior ability who wishes to undertake an independent writing project. One or two credit hours.

RHET 4190 Colloquium in Rhetoric and Writing
Prerequisite: senior standing. Focuses on professional development and synthesizing the major concepts within rhetorical/writing theory. One credit hours.

RHET 4202 Teaching Writing in Secondary Schools
Prerequisite: RHET 1312. A methods course team-taught by faculty from the Departments of English and Rhetoric and Writing. Topics include making classroom presentations, managing small-group work, responding to student writing, evaluating and using secondary school literature and composition textbooks, and learning approaches to teaching literature and writing. Taken in conjunction with ENGL 4202. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as RHET
5202. Two credit hours.

RHET 4191, 4291 Writing Internship
Prerequisites: junior standing, consent of director. On-the-job training for students planning to enter a writing career or teach writing. For assignment, see the director of the University Writing Center in the Department of Rhetoric and Writing. CR/NC grading optional. One or two credit hours.

RHET 4301 Theories of Rhetoric and Writing
Prerequisites: RHET 3315 with a grade of C or greater, or consent of instructor. A study of theories of rhetoric and writing. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as RHET 5301. Three credit hours.

RHET 4304 Technical Style and Editing
Prerequisites: RHET 3301 with a grade of C or greater, or consent of instructor. Survey and study of institutional and industrial style manuals. Intensive practice in editing technical, business, government, and scientific reports. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as RHET 5304. Three credit hours.

RHET 4305 Document Design
Prerequisite: RHET 3316 or 3326. Study and practice of the use of visual elements in technical communication. Emphasis on typography, page layout, data displays, pictorial communication, and usability testing for both print and online documents. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as RHET 5305. Three credit hours.

RHET 4306 Writing for Business and Government
Prerequisite: RHET 3316 or 3326 with a grade of C or greater, or consent of instructor. Theory of and practice in writing for government and business organizations. Topics will include training manuals, job descriptions, policy writing, records, and correspondence. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as RHET 5306. Three credit hours.

RHET 4307 Writing Software Documentation
Prerequisite: RHET 3316 or 3326 with a grade of C or greater, or consent of instructor. Study and practice of writing documentation for computer software, including printed manuals, tutorials, reference guides, and online help systems. Emphasis on analyzing prospective users and their tasks, interviewing subject matter experts, developing help for different levels of users, writing user-friendly text, editing documentation for style and clarity, and working on a documentation team. Intensive practice with RoboHELP HTML software for composing online help. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as RHET 5307. Three credit hours.

RHET 4315 Advanced Persuasive Writing
Prerequisite: RHET 3315 with a grade of C or greater, or permission of the instructor. Intensive study of classical and new rhetorics. Emphasis on solving rhetorical problems. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as RHET 5315. Three credit hours.

RHET 4317 Advanced Nonfiction Writing

Prerequisite: RHET 3317 with a grade of C or greater, or consent of the instructor. An advanced nonfiction writing class. Study and practice of writing to explore, investigate, and explain. Students will write a variety of professional, scholarly, and popular essays. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as RHET 5317. Three credit hours.

RHET 4321 Editing for Publication
Prerequisite: RHET 3301. A hands-on experience in pre-production editing for publication. Includes study of the editing process, manuscript acquisition, the peer review process, manuscript editing, editorial correspondence, and pre- production manuscript preparation. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as RHET 5321. Three credit hours.

RHET 4325 Legal Writing, Reasoning, and Argument
Prerequisite: RHET 3315 or permission of instructor. Designed for all majors, particularly for pre-law students and writers interested in the discourse of the law. Students will read a variety of judicial decisions on current issues such as Freedom of Speech and complete several relatively short assignments focusing on legal reasoning and argument. Students will also learn how to find information on legal decisions and issues. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as RHET 5325. Three credit hours.

RHET 4345 Topics in Persuasive Writing
Prerequisite: RHET 3315 with a grade of C or greater, or consent of the instructor. Theory and practice of persuasion with topics varying each semester. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as RHET 5345. Three credit hours.

RHET 4346 Topics in Technical Communication
Prerequisite: RHET 3316 or RHET 3326 with a grade of C or greater, or consent of the instructor. The theory and practice of technical communication; topics vary each semester. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as RHET 5346. Three credit hours.

RHET 4347 Topics in Nonfiction Writing
Prerequisite: RHET 3317 with a grade of C or greater, or consent of the instructor. Theory and practice of nonfiction writing with topics varying each semester. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as RHET 5347. Three credit hours.

RHET 4371 Writing on the Web
Prerequisite: RHET 3316 or RHET 3326 with a grade of C or greater, or consent of instructor. Ability to compose effective technical writing and/or computer competency. Introduction to basic web design and construction; course emphasizes audience(s), purpose(s), and accessibility issues such as web site navigation, multiple browsers, and ADA compliance. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as RHET 5371. Three credit hours.

RHET 4372 Usability Testing and Design
Prerequisite: RHET 3316, RHET 3326, IFSC 1310, RST 2318, or consent of instructor. An introduction to principles of user experience (UX) design, usability, and usability testing in the context of new media. Topics covered include interaction design, audience and requirements analysis, prototyping, document aesthetics, and usability testing procedures. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as RHET 5372. Three credit hours.

RHET 4375 Grant Writing
Prerequisites: RHET 3316 or RHET 3326 with a grade of C or greater, or consent of the instructor. Survey, theory and practice of grant writing (solicited and non- solicited) and the philanthropic sector. Topics include, but are not limited to, finding and researching a foundation, resources for each stage of the grant writing process, developing a problem statement, creating objectives and goals, creating a budget, and working with foundations. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as RHET 5375. Three credit hours.

RHET 4395,4396 Cooperative Education
Prerequisite: RHET 3315, 3316, or 3317; recommendation of the departmental cooperative education coordinator. Designed to complement and extend the classroom learning experience through the application of theoretical concepts in a professional workplace. Exact number of work hours, activities, and responsibilities depend on the work experience and must be specified in a written agreement between the employer and student in coordination with the Office of Cooperative Education. Three credit hours.

RHET 4398,4399 Senior Writing Project
Prerequisites: senior writing major or minor with 12 hours of upper-level courses. Student will complete either a portfolio or a final project written in cooperative arrangement with advisor from both major and minor department. Three credit hours.

SCHL – Scholars

SCHL 1101, 1102 Scholars Colloquium I and II
Prerequisite: admission to the Scholars Program or consent of the program director. Weekly discussions with faculty and community representatives and a time for advising, testing, and other organizational aspects of the program. One credit hour each semester.

SCHL 1300, 1301 Rhetoric and Communication I and II
Prerequisite: admission to the Scholars Program or consent of the program director. Logic combined with oral and written communication; critical examination of ideas and facts in a rhetorical context; and effective communication. Three credit hours each semester.

SCHL 1320, 1321 Science and Society I and II
Prerequisite: admission to the Scholars Program or consent of the program director. Science as a mode of thought and a method of inquiry; impact of scientific thought and scientific technological discoveries on humanity. Three credit hours each semester.

SCHL 2300, 2301, 3300 History of Ideas I, II, and III
Prerequisite: admission to the Scholars Program or consent of the program director. This course examines three recurring themes: humanity’s conceptions of and perceived relationships to the divine; humanity’s conceptions of reality in general and perceived methods of knowing this reality; and humanity’s conceptions of the roles people do and should play as individuals and as members of the social order. These themes are studied in both Western and non-Western cultures, using the methods of history, philosophy, and the study of literature. This is a three-semester course; all three semesters must be taken. The normal sequence is II, III, I. Three credit hours each semester.

SCHL 2310, 2311 Individual and Society I and II
Prerequisite: admission to the Scholars Program or consent of the program director. Individual and group relationships, combining views from political science, anthropology, psychology, literature, and history. Three credit hours each semester.

SCHL 3310, 3311 Individual and the Creative Arts I and II
Prerequisite: admission to the Scholars Program or consent of the program director. An examination of the role of artistic endeavors in enriching human life, including material from art, architecture, music, dance, literature, and theatre. Students must attend and discuss concerts, plays, exhibits, and related events. Three credit hours each semester.

SCHL 3150, 3250, 3350 Scholars Seminar
Prerequisite: admission to the Scholars Program or consent of the program director. Special courses on topics that vary from semester to semester. Scholars seminars will explore issues in depth from an interdisciplinary perspective. These seminars involve active modes of learning (such as reports, projects, or fieldwork); enrollment is normally limited to 15. Non-scholars students are admitted when space is available. One, two, or three credit hours.

SCHL 4399 Independent Study
Prerequisite: admission to the Scholars Program or consent of the program director. This course is designed for students engaged in research leading to the Scholars final project. Topic and thesis committee must be approved by the Scholars Policy Council. Three credit hours.

SOCI – Sociology

SOCI 2300 Introduction to Sociology
Recommended: RHET 1311. Introduction to sociological concepts. Analysis of society, particularly the study of human organization. An overview of the theories and methods utilized in the discipline is provided and will be used as a framework for critical analysis. Students will learn to investigate group and societal connections in major social institutions-religion, family, politics, economics, education. Three credit hours. (ACTS Course Number SOCI 1013)

SOCI 2301 World Cultures
See INTS 2301.

SOCI 3300 Sociology of Sports
An overview of sports in the contemporary United States; covers the athletes, the spectators (on site, television, and radio), the therapeutic functions for individuals, and the impact of sports on other institutions in society. Explores the commercialization of sports and its effects on other economic activities. Three credit hours.

SOCI 3312 North American Indians
Prerequisite: ANTH 2316. A study of Indian cultures from the Arctic to northern Mexico from immediately after European contact to the present. Three credit hours.

SOCI 3316 Japanese Culture and Society
Prerequisite: ANTH 2316 or SOCI 2300. The anthropological and sociological study of Japanese culture and society; covers Japanese history, major social institutions, and aspects of culture that are unique to Japan. Three credit hours.

SOCI 3318 Sexuality, Society, and Culture
See ANTH 3318.

SOCI 3330 Racial and Minority Groups
Prerequisite: SOCI 2300. Analysis of social processes in a pluralistic society, with emphasis on the cultural contributions and ethos of the different ethnic groups. Three credit hours.

SOCI 3333 Women in a Changing Society
Prerequisite: SOCI 2300. An analysis of the socialization of women for their ascribed roles, with emphasis on the molding forces of culture and the changes taking place in women’s roles in contemporary, US, and other societies. Three credit hours.

SOCI 3334 Social Problems
Prerequisite: SOCI 2300. Application of sociological principles to the study of social problems, such as juvenile delinquency, sex-based inequality, educational systems, ethnic groups, ethnic group conflict, crime, industrial conflict and unemployment, poverty, and the maintenance of a free society. Three credit hours.

SOCI 3335 Sociology of Deviant Behavior
Prerequisite: SOCI 2300. A survey of deviant behavior in modern society. Emphasis on the theories and causes of deviant behavior, including societal reactions and deviant action and reaction in the contemporary United States. Emphasis on the various theoretical orientations used in sociology today. Three credit hours.

SOCI 3336 Criminology
Prerequisite: SOCI 2300. The nature of criminal deviation, theories of causations, processes of criminal justice, penal and correctional methods and institutions. Three credit hours.

SOCI 3337 Juvenile Delinquency
Prerequisite: SOCI 2300. Juvenile delinquent behavior, problems, theory, cause, control, and prevention. Three credit hours.

SOCI 3340 Experiences of Black Americans
Prerequisite: SOCI 2300. The experiences of blacks in America are subdivided into significant periods with corresponding motifs. Attempts will be made to conceptualize the major influences from each motif-period in the struggle of blacks for sociopolitical and economic equality in a dominantly white society. Three credit hours.

SOCI 3341 Urban Sociology
Prerequisite: SOCI 2300. Analysis of elements of change in cities and suburbs in contemporary society. Social problems related to urbanization and urban centers. Three credit hours.

SOCI 3343 Social Stratification
Prerequisite: SOCI 2300. Analysis of selected theories of stratification, various lifestyles, other bases of social differentiation, and their consequences for individuals and society. Three credit hours.

SOCI 3346 Sociology of the Family
Prerequisite: SOCI 2300. The family as a major unifying force for the individual, the community, and the total society, with emphasis on parental and marital dynamics; analysis of the changes associated with the emergence of urban industrial societies. Three credit hours.

SOCI 3350 Family Violence
A consideration of abuse, neglect, and conflict within the family. Review of basic theories of interpersonal violence and conflict resolution. Focus on abuse of children, siblings, spouses, and elders. Discussion of social policy responses and appropriate interventions. Three credit hours.

SOCI 3370 The Sociology of Mental Health
The cultural, social, and social-psychological aspects of mental health. Examination of issues such as who is normal, how one is declared abnormal, theories of mental health and illness, and various modes of treatment. Three credit hours.

SOCI 3376 Sociology of Health and Illness
Prerequisite: SOCI 2300. Sociological theory and research related to social epidemiology and to the organization of efforts to cope with illness and disease. Three credit hours.

SOCI 3381 Social Statistics
Prerequisite: SOCI 2300. Recommended: MATH 1301 or equivalent. Basic statistical techniques and their corresponding theoretical premises, which are often used in statistical reasoning in sociology. Qualitative variables, characteristics of attributes, measures of their variation, correlation, and tests of significance are stressed. Three credit hours.

SOCI 3383 Classical Sociological Theory
Prerequisite: SOCI 2300. The conceptual and historical framework of classical sociological theories will be considered. Special emphases will be given to pre-twentieth-century theory and the philosophical underpinnings of sociological theory. Three credit hours.

SOCI 3384 Contemporary Sociological Theory
Prerequisite: SOCI 2300. Introduction to and critical examination of contemporary sociological theory. The course offers an overview of the concepts, methods, and theoretical perspectives employed by contemporary sociologists. Students are encouraged to take this course after completing SOCI 3383. Three credit hours.

SOCI 3385 Research Methods
Prerequisite: SOCI 2300. Recommended: MATH 1301 or equivalent. Methods of research in sociology; trends in methodology and use of computers in processing data and presentation of research reports. Three credit hours.

SOCI 3392 Environmental Sociology
Prerequisite: SOCI 2300. The environment viewed from a sociological perspective. The environmental movement and issues, such as the transition to an ecologically sound society, as they relate to the social structure of United States society. Three credit hours.

SOCI 4320 Sociocultural Change
See ANTH 4320.

SOCI 4321 Religion, Society, and Culture
See ANTH 4321.

SOCI 4328 Sociology Field Experience
Prerequisites: SOCI 2300, senior standing, or consent of chairperson. Practical experience consisting of at least 90 hours of supervised work in a community agency or any other context of sociological interest. The objective is for students to apply theoretical orientations to real world situations and to develop working skills. May be repeated one time. Three credit hours.

SOCI 4330 Political Sociology
Prerequisite: SOCI 2300. The sociological study of the United States political economy. Sociological theories and concepts applied to the analysis of various aspects of political theory and behavior. Three credit hours.

SOCI 4332 Population Analysis
Prerequisite: SOCI 2300. Population growth; description of population dynamics; analysis of economic, social and political, and ecological implications of population growth or decrease. Three credit hours.

SOCI 4353 The Sociology of Developing Nations
Prerequisite: SOCI 2300. A study of the socioeconomic characteristics of third world nations with emphasis on the sociocultural values and dynamics relevant to economic development theories and programs. Three credit hours.

SOCI 4365 Sociology of Organizations
Prerequisite: SOCI 2300. Examination of a variety of complex organizations in modern society: schools, hospitals, corporations, unions, universities, and government. Organizational structures and processes are analyzed with emphasis on inter-organizational and organization-environment relations. Three credit hours.

SOCI 4387 Seminar in Sociology
Prerequisites: SOCI 2300, 3381, 3383 or 3384, 3385, and senior standing. The use of sociological theories and methods to address issues of practical concern to clients; clinical practice, policy analysis, consultation to business and government, and applied social research. Three credit hours.

SOCI 4190, 4290, 4390 Independent Study
Prerequisites: SOCI 2300, 3181, 3381, 3383 or 3384, 3385, 3185 or 15 hours in departmental courses, senior standing, or consent of chairperson. Advanced assignments in selected areas. One, two, or three credit hours.

SOCI 4393 Sociology Internship in the SNRC
Prerequisite: declared major, 60 hours of course work completed, consent of the department chairperson and director of the Sequoyah National Research Center (SNRC). Students will work under the direction of the directors of the SNRC in areas

SOWK – Social Work

SOWK 1301 Introduction to Social Work
This course focuses on the major concepts and principles of professional social work, including: the development of social welfare; the history of social work; the knowledge, skills, and value base of social work; models of social work methods; and current social work practice applications. The course also looks at the basis of knowledge from which the theories of social justice and diversity spring and lays a foundation for social workers’ professional entry into both public and private arenas. Three credit hours.

SOWK 3302 Social Work and Diversity
Prerequisites: formal admission to the social work program and completion of SOWK 1301 with a grade of “C” or above. This course focuses on the strengths and challenges faced by different groups including but not limited to gay, lesbian, and bisexual individuals; people of color; people with disabilities; religious minorities; and the elderly. Students will learn about the characteristics of culturally competent social work practice with diverse populations and the knowledge, attitudes, and skills for working with different population groups. Three credit hours.

SOWK 3303 Human Behavior in the Social Environment I
Prerequisites: formal admission to social work and SOWK 1301 with a grade of “C” or above. Part one of a two-course sequence, this course provides students with the content necessary to understand the complexities of human development and behavior. Students learn to evaluate various social environmental influences that affect human behavior and functioning as well as the ways in which the social environment can impede or promote well-being. Particular attention is paid to life span development of infancy, early childhood and adolescence as well as highlighting issues of oppression, privilege and discrimination. Three credit hours.

SOWK 3304 Human Behavior in the Social Environment II
Prerequisites: formal admission to social work and SOWK 1301 and 3303 with a grade of “C” or above. Part two of a two-course sequence, this course continues to analyze theories of the development and behavior of individuals, families, communities, groups, and organizations, as well as the interactions of these systems with and among one another in larger socio-cultural environments. Particular attention is paid to life span development of young adulthood, middle adulthood and older adulthood. Three credit hours.

SOWK 3313 Social Welfare Policy
Prerequisites: Formal admission to the social work program or human services minor and SOWK 1301 with a grade of “C” or above. Part one of a two-course sequence, this course examines policy-making in the governmental context. The process at the local, state, regional and national levels will be reviewed and service and benefits entitlements provided under these policies will be summarized. The history, organization, guiding principles and resulting programs that govern major social welfare institutions will be explored. Theories of social justice will be studied to understand the phrasing of policy claims and their assessment. Three credit hours.

SOWK 3314 Social Welfare Policy II
Prerequisite: formal admission to social work and SOWK 1301 and 3313 with a grade of “C” or above. Part two of a two-course sequence, this course explores topics such as (1) history and current structures of social welfare services, (2) the role of policy in service delivery and in social work practice, (3) attainment of individual and social well being, and (4) comparative and international social welfare. The course also emphasizes understanding of current developments in social welfare, factors affecting the structure and dynamics of social welfare policies/services as well as understanding the role of the social work profession within that framework. Additionally, models for analyzing social welfare policy are introduced, and students apply these models to past policy decisions and current issues. Three credit hours.

SOWK 3315 Policy Practice
Prerequisites: SOWK 3313, SOWK 3314, and formal admission to the social work program. Training student social workers to engage in policy practice. Oriented to the creation of the professional skills associated with policy action. Conceptualizes policy action as a series of skill areas that start with problem identification and analysis and conclude with policy proposal, action planning, and mobilization of political and public support. Three credit hours.

SOWK 3322 Methods of Social Work Research
Prerequisites: MATH 1302 or MATH 1315, and formal admission to the social work program. An overview of the approaches to and uses of research in generalist social work practice. Emphasis placed on the practice-research link with a focus on conducting practice and program evaluation within a social work agency setting. Ethical and human diversity issues are considered throughout the course.

SOWK 3331 Social Work Practice I
Prerequisites: SOWK 3303, and formal admission to the social work program. This is the first course in a three-course practice sequence, introduces the student to therapeutic relationship building, interviewing, and client-system assessment. The primary objective of the sequence is to prepare students to engage in culturally-competent, family-centered practice which incorporates a strengths perspective needed for practice with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Three credit hours.

SOWK 3381 Statistics for Social Workers
Prerequisite: SOWK 1301, formal admission to the social work program. This course is an introduction to statistics and their use in analyzing and interpreting data. The course is designed to teach students statistics applicable to social work practice and decision-making. In particular, it is an introduction to probability, descriptive statistics, and beginning inferential statistics. The course covers basic descriptive statistics and introduces the student to hypothesis testing and bivariate statistics. Students will use the knowledge of statistics learned in this course to interpret and critique statistical analyses published in journal articles. Students will also analyze real data, interpret the findings and write reports. Three credit hours.

SOWK 4212 Field Seminar I
Prerequisites: formal admission to BSW program; a “C” or better in SOWK 1301, 3303, 3304, 3313, 3314, 3302, 3331; a 2.5 cumulative GPA in all social work courses taken to date; a 2.5 overall GPA; and formal admission to the Field Experience. Corequisite: SOWK 4341/4541. Pre or corequisite: SOWK 4332. Field Seminar I is the first of a two course seminar that provides the student with the opportunity to integrate knowledge and insights developed in the classroom by exploring the field experience through the group process. The practice model of engagement, assessment, planning, implementation, evaluation and termination is the basis for student learning and self-evaluation. This course introduces the student to “use of self” within the group context and utilizes presentations, case consultations, group process, agency resources, ethical dilemmas, and personal development to achieve professional awareness and identity. Student must receive a “B” or higher to move on to Field Seminar II. Two credit hours.

SOWK 4190 Independent Study
Prerequisites: SOWK 1301, formal admission to the social work program, and consent of instructor. Advanced study and assignments in selected areas of social work. One credit hour.

SOWK 4213 Field Seminar II
Prerequisites: formal admission to BSW program; a “C” or better in SOWK 1301, 3303, 3304, 3313, 3314, 3302, 3331; a “B” in SOWK 4212 and 4341/4541; a 2.5 cumulative GPA in all social work courses taken to date; a 2.5 overall GPA; and formal admission to the Field Experience. Corequisite: SOWK 4342/4542. Pre or corequisite: SOWK 4333. Field Seminar II is the second of two seminars that provide the student with the opportunity to integrate knowledge and insights developed in the classroom by exploring the field experience through the group process. The Generalist Intervention Model of engagement, assessment, planning, implementation, evaluation and termination is the basis for student learning and self-evaluation. Seminar II builds on the strengths and experience of Seminar I to further student development toward full integration of knowledge, skills and values in generalist practice. Group discussion and process, the basis and coordination of skills, establishment of values, collaboration with colleagues, and community visits provide the framework to identify as a professional social worker. Student must receive a “B” or higher to move on to graduate. Two credit hours.

SOWK 4290 Independent Study
Prerequisites: SOWK 1301, formal admission to the social work program, and consent of instructor. Advanced study and assignments in selected areas of social work. Two credit hours.

SOWK 4330 Animal Assisted Therapy
Prerequisite: junior status. Course provides an overview of the interdisciplinary field of animal-assisted therapy and the human-animal bond. Course will include observations of AAT visits to human service settings and web-enhanced classes. Three credit hours.

SOWK 4310 Social Gerontology
This course explores the social aspects of aging – how do older adults affect society and how does society affect older adults? The interaction of older adults with society is examined along with many of our social institutions such as family, healthcare, government, and the economy. Also examined are the issues associated with our aging population and how those issues affect people of all ages. A number of current controversies associated with our changing population structure will be discussed in class. Three credit hours.

SOWK 4330 Animal Assisted Therapy
Prerequisite: junior status. Course provides an overview of the interdisciplinary field of animal-assisted therapy and the human-animal bond. Course will include observations of AAT visits to human service settings and web-enhanced classes. Three credit hours.

SOWK 4332 Social Work Practice II
Prerequisites: SOWK 3331. The second in the three-course sequence, this course builds on the foundation interviewing and client-system assessment skills by introducing students to various intervention skills to be used with individuals, groups, communities, and in family-centered practice. The focus is on generalist practice utilizing problem-solving and solution-focused techniques. Skills learned in this course are integrated with actual practice experience through the SOWK 4541 Field Experience I and SOWK 4212 Field Seminar I. Three credit hours.

SOWK 4333 Social Work Practice III
Prerequisites: SOWK 4332. The third in the three-course sequence, this course builds on the foundation interviewing and client-system assessment skills presented in Practice I and the various intervention skills to be used with individuals, groups, communities, and in family-centered practice, which were the focus of Practice II. Practice III introduces methods for terminating a client from service by focusing on final empowerment strategies and strategies for program and practice evaluation. The focus on program and practice evaluation, in correlation with social work values, will integrate research methods into the professional world of practice. Skills learned in this course will also help to prepare the student for supervisory and managerial positions within the agency arena and are integrated with actual practice experience through the SOWK 4542 Field Experience I and SOWK 4213 Field Seminar I. Three credit hours.

SOWK 4336 Social Aspects Death & Dying
Gerontology and social work seek to apply knowledge from the social sciences, medicine, and the humanities with the skills and values of the helping professions. The multidisciplinary study of death (thanatology) itself comes out of studying these different disciplines. There are many social, psychological, philosophical, and religious theories concerning the passage of death—for both ourselves and those around us. We will study many diverse contributions in the social aspects of death and dying. Three credit hours.

SOWK 4337 Adult Development and Aging
This course emphasizes the life course perspective as it looks at adult development and aging within the context of the social environment. Aspects of “successful aging” that will be examined cover growth and development from emerging adulthood to old age, and the impact that culture, gender, ethnicity, and individual differences have on these processes. Human development and aging is examined during early adulthood, middle adulthood, and late adulthood. We will study aspects of development that are common to persons at all ages across the life course, individual differences in development, and differences that characterize the separate age cohorts. Three credit hours.

SOWK 4341/4541 Field Experience I
Prerequisites: formal admission to BSW program; a “C” or better in SOWK 1301, 3303, 3304, 3313, 3314, 3302, 3331; a “B” in SOWK 4212 and 4541; a 2.5 cumulative GPA in all social work courses taken to date; a 2.5 overall GPA; and formal admission to the Field Experience. Corequisite: SOWK 4542. Pre or corequisite: SOWK 4332. Field Experience I is the first of two opportunities for the student to integrate knowledge and values acquired in the classroom into practice by observing and engaging with the client system under supervision of a social worker in a human services agency. The introduction of the student to direct practice will involve the elements of the generalist intervention model: engagement, assessment, planning, implementation, evaluation, and termination. Field Experience I provides a structured learning environment in which professional ethics, critical thinking, generalist practice, and applicable skills are explored for greater depth and application. The corequisite SOWK 4212, Field Seminar I, is offered concurrently with Field Experience I for in-depth consultation with other students and seminar instructor to allow feedback and consultation in a group process. SOWK 4541 is 240 hours in the field setting in the fall semester of the senior year for five credits. The student must receive a “B” in order to progress to Field Experience II.

SOWK 4342/4542 Field Experience II
Prerequisites: formal admission to BSW program; a “C” or better in SOWK 1301, 3303, 3304, 3313, 3314, 3302, 3331; a “B” in SOWK 4212 and 4341/4541; a 2.5 cumulative GPA in all social work courses taken to date; a 2.5 overall GPA; and formal admission to the Field Experience. Corequisite: SOWK 4342/4542. Pre or corequisite: SOWK 4333. Field Experience II is the second of two opportunities for the student to integrate knowledge developed in the classroom into practice by working directly with the client system under supervision of a social worker. Field Experience II provides a structured learning environment in which professional ethics, critical thinking, generalist practice, and applicable skills are explored for greater depth and application. The corequisite SOWK 4213, Field Seminar II, is offered concurrently with Field Experience II for in-depth consultation with other students and seminar instructor to allow feedback and consultation in a group process. SOWK 4542 is 240 hours in the field setting in the spring semester of the senior year for five credits. The student must receive a “B” in order to graduate from the social work program.

SOWK 4390 Independent Study
Prerequisites: SOWK 1301, formal admission to the social work program, and consent of instructor. Advanced study and assignments in selected areas of social work. Three credit hours.

SPAN – Spanish

SPAN 1111 Elementary Spanish Laboratory I
Corequisite: SPAN 1311. Supervised laboratory practice in listening, speaking, and aural comprehension. One credit hour.

SPAN 1112 Elementary Spanish Laboratory II
Corequisite: SPAN 1312. Continuation of SPAN 1111. One credit hour.

SPAN 1301 Reading Spanish
Essential grammar for reading Spanish with minor emphasis on pronunciation. Will not substitute for any other course in Spanish or apply toward a major or minor in Spanish. Three credit hours.

SPAN 1311 Elementary Spanish I
A course for students with no knowledge of Spanish. Instruction in correct pronunciation, aural comprehension, and simple speaking ability. Three credit hours.(ACTS Course Number SPAN 1013)

SPAN 1312 Elementary Spanish II
Prerequisite: SPAN 1311 or equivalent. Practice in correct pronunciation, aural comprehension, and simple speaking ability leading to mastery of basic grammar and limited reading ability. Three credit hours.(ACTS Course Number SPAN 1023)

SPAN 1315 Conversational Spanish
Prerequisite: SPAN 1312 or consent of instructor. A performance course with emphasis on elementary conversation and discussion. For students with a basic knowledge of Spanish grammar. Three credit hours.

SPAN 2311 Intermediate Spanish
Prerequisite: SPAN 1312 or equivalent. The intermediate course leads to a greater facility in the spoken language and to more advanced reading skills. Three credit hours.(ACTS Course Number SPAN 2013)

SPAN 2315 Intermediate Spanish Conversation
Prerequisite: SPAN 2311 or consent of instructor. A course to practice oral skills on a wide range of topics. Students narrate, describe, compare, and comment. Three credit hours.

SPAN 3115, 3116, 3117 Advanced Spanish Conversation
Prerequisite: SPAN 2315 or higher or consent of instructor. A course to practice oral skills on a wide range of topics. Leads to expanded vocabulary mastery and greater fluency in the spoken idiom. May be taken to a maximum of three hours.

SPAN 3301 Contextualized Spanish Grammar
An intensive study of Spanish grammar and application of specific grammatical structures to authentic communicative contexts. Three credit hours.

SPAN 3310 Communications: Presentational
Prerequisite: SPAN 2311. An integrated approach to skill acquisition leading to intermediate-high proficiency. Within the rubric of communication, content focuses on the presentational mode. Three credit hours.

SPAN 3311 Communications: Interpersonal
Prerequisite: SPAN 2311. An integrated approach to skill acquisition leading to intermediate-high proficiency. Within the rubric of communication, content focuses on the interpersonal mode. Three credit hours.

SPAN 3312 Communications: Interpretive
Prerequisite: SPAN 2311. An integrated approach to skill acquisition leading to intermediate-high proficiency. Within the rubric of communication, content focuses on the interpretive mode. Three credit hours.

SPAN 3316 Spanish Phonetics
Prerequisite: SPAN 2311 or consent of instructor. The sounds and phonetic symbols of the Spanish language with reference to phrasing, stress, rhythm, and intonation. Three credit hours.

SPAN 3321 Spanish Short Stories
Prerequisite: SPAN 2311 or consent of instructor. Reading and criticism of short stories by outstanding authors. Three credit hours.

SPAN 3332 Introduction to Spanish Literature
Prerequisite: SPAN 2311. History of the literature of Spain from the medieval period to the present. Three credit hours.

SPAN 3333 Selected Readings in Spanish Literature
Prerequisite: 3000-level Spanish course or consent of instructor. Reading and discussion of selected works from Spanish and Spanish American literature. Three credit hours.

SPAN 3334 Hispanic Culture: Peninsular
Prerequisite: SPAN 2311 or equivalent (or corequisite with consent of instructor). Historical, sociological, and cultural background of people of the Iberian peninsula. Three credit hours.

SPAN 3335 Hispanic Culture: Americas
Prerequisite: SPAN 2311 or equivalent (may be corequisite with consent of the instructor). Historical, sociological, and cultural background of Hispano-America. Three credit hours.

SPAN 4311 Literature of the Golden Age
Prerequisite: 3000-level Spanish course. Selected dramatic and prose writings of the Golden Age. Three credit hours.

SPAN 4331 Nineteenth-Century Literature
Prerequisite: 3000-level Spanish course. Readings and criticism of outstanding authors of this period. Three credit hours.

SPAN 4341 Twentieth-Century Literature
Prerequisite: 3000-level Spanish course. Writings of the “Generation of ‘98” and more recent authors. Three credit hours.

SPAN 4351 Spanish American Literature
Prerequisite: 3000-level Spanish course. Reading of works by several representative Latin American authors. Three credit hours.

SPAN 4361, 4362 Seminar
Prerequisite: Senior standing in Spanish or consent of instructor. Advanced topics in language, literature, or linguistics. May be repeated for maximum of 6 hours per seminar course. Three credit hours.

SPAN 4101, 4201, 4301 Independent Study
Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Reading from a selected bibliography in Spanish. Credit is determined at the beginning of the semester by the complexity of the problem and will not be altered. Open only to majors. One, two, or three credit hours.

SPCH – Speech Communication

SPCH 1300 Speech Communication
This course helps students effectively deliver an oral presentation to an adult audience; listen to and critique objectively the oral presentations of others; effectively participate in one-to-one communication experiences using techniques of active listening, conflict resolution, and information gathering; organize, participate in, and lead small groups as they problem-solve; and recognize and use effective oral language as a tool of sound reasoning. Student performance is emphasized along with lecture, discussion, and self-instructional study center exercises. Students learn through writing, reading, discussing, listening, and participating in critical thinking and problem-solving activities. Three credit hours. (ACTS Course Number SPCH 1003)

SPCH 2310 Human Communication Concepts
Prerequisite: SPCH 1300. This course provides an overview to the study of human communication. A number of contemporary approaches to human interaction in interpersonal, small group, organizational, and intercultural situations are reviewed. The focus is on learning the basic terminology and theoretical concepts associated with the general study of communication. Three credit hours.

SPCH 2311 Introduction to Communication Research
Prepares students to understand the research and application focus of a major in communication. Topics include asking good research questions, the role of case studies in communication research, and understanding basic research principles. The focus of this course is to enable students to apply theory in meaningful ways to better understand real life situations. Three credit hours.

SPCH 3300 Interpersonal Communication
Prerequisite: SPCH 1300. Enhances the student’s ability to understand and participate in effective interpersonal communication. Topics include verbal and nonverbal communication, relational management, self-concept, and relationship roles. Focus on using major interpersonal theories and concepts, as well as in-class activities to develop a heightened awareness of relationship issues, as well as interpersonal communication competence. Three credit hours.

SPCH 3315 Gender Communication
An examination of gender as it influences verbal and nonverbal interaction between men and women. Topics include the ways communication in families, schools, media, and society creates and perpetuates gender roles, and how socially-created gender differences in public and private setting affect success, satisfaction, and self-esteem. Focus on using major gender communication theories and concepts to develop a heightened awareness of gender issues that relate to human interaction. Three credit hours.

SPCH 3316 Interviewing
Prerequisite: SPCH 1300. This course develops the student’s ability to effectively prepare for and participate in a variety of interview situations. Topics include impression management, rapport building, interview organization, effective questions and answers, and effective listening. Types of interviews covered include employment, probing, survey, persuasive, selection, performance, counseling, and health care. The focus is on using in-class activities to develop effective interviewing skills. Three credit hours.

SPCH 3320 Advanced Public Speaking
Prerequisite: SPCH 1300. This course develops the student’s ability to effectively prepare and deliver a speech. Topics include audience analysis, critical thinking and listening, the use of supporting materials and visual aids, and the development of presentation skills. The focus is on using in-class activities to develop effective research, organization, and presentation skills. Three credit hours.

SPCH 3322 Small Group Communication
Prerequisite: SPCH 1300. This course develops the student’s ability to effectively communicate in small groups or teams. Topics include group formation, group leadership, effective listening in groups, techniques of problem solving, group norms, effective group participation, and management of group conflict. The focus is on using in-class and group activities to develop effective small-group interaction skills and group presentation skills. Three credit hours.

SPCH 3323 Conflict Management
Prerequisite: SPCH 1300. Development of the student’s ability to effectively manage conflict in organizations, groups, and personal relationships. Topics include theories, styles, patterns, and systems of conflict as well as conflict management techniques of negotiation, and mediation. The focus is using in-class activities to better understand the factor and dynamics of conflict resolution and develop effective conflict management skills. Three credit hours.

SPCH 3330 Professional Communication
Prerequisite: SPCH 1300. Development of the student’s ability to effectively interact in professional business situations. Topics include listening, coaching/mentoring, dealing with difficult people, delegation, formal and informal communication, civility, and customer service. Focus on using in-class activities to develop effective professional communication skills. Three credit hours.

SPCH 3340 Communication Ethics for the Professional
Prerequisite: SPCH 1300. This course explores the common ethical questions encountered in business and professional settings. Topics include whistle blowing, employee rights, public relations, ethical codes, sexual harassment, leadership ethics, and organizational legitimacy. The focus is on illustrating the importance of ethics to the professional through practical applications of communication-based principles. Three credit hours.

SPCH 3350 Nonverbal Communication
Prerequisite: SPCH 1300. Examination of codes of nonverbal communication within personal, interpersonal, and professional contexts. Topics include the functional perspective of nonverbal communication; factor of appearance, body language, space, touch, paralanguage, artifactics, and time; interpersonal attractiveness; credibility; dominance; and impression management. Focus on using major nonverbal communication theories and concepts to develop a heightened awareness of the role of non-verbals in human interaction. Three credit hours.

SPCH 4110 Senior Presentation
Prerequisite: SPCH 4300. Development and presentation of a major work done in the senior seminar. Part of the speech communication major capstone sequence. One credit hour.

SPCH 4100, 4201 Independent Study
Prerequisite: SPCH 1300. These courses provide students with an opportunity to read and conduct research in a selected area of speech communication studies. Projects and papers must be approved by the instructor prior to registration. One or two credit hours.

SPCH 4300 Senior Seminar
Prerequisites: SPCH 2310, Speech 2310, and 15 hours in speech communication. Application of human communication theory to real situations. Topics include researching the communication literature, organizing arguments, analyzing communication events, and deriving practical implications from communication theory. Focus on applying a specific communication theory to a specific real-life situation. Part of the speech communication major capstone sequence. Three credit hours.

SPCH 4310 Investigations into Communication Research
Prerequisite: SPCH 1300 and 4300. Examination of the applied role of communication research methods in a variety of contemporary organizations. Topics include the research process, both quantitative and qualitative research approaches, as well as questions of research ethics. Focus on identifying the practical applications of research methods for organizational members. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as SPCH 5310. Three credit hours.

SPCH 4311 Organizational Communication
Prerequisite: SPCH 2310. Examination of organizational communication theories, communicative implications of historical and modern management theories, as well as special interest topics. Major topics include cultural and critical approaches to organizational communication, classical management and human relations theory, and communication effectiveness. Special topics may include teams in organizations, diversity, organizational politics, leadership and change. Focus on applying organizational communication theories and concepts to understand others better and to control one’s own communication in organizations. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as SPCH 5311. Three credit hours.

SPCH 4312 Intercultural Communication
Prerequisites: SPCH 1300. Examination of culture as it influences human interaction in a wide range of contexts, including work, medical, interpersonal and political. Topics include culture shock, language, nonverbal, intercultural conflict, and culture and the media. Focus on using major intercultural communication theories and concepts, as well as in class activities to develop a heightened awareness of intercultural issues, as well as intercultural communication competence. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as SPCH 5312. Three credit hours.

SPCH 4313 Seminar: Topics in Communication
Prerequisites: SPCH 2310. Investigation of timely communication theories, skills, and practices. Topics selected from a variety of theoretical or practical perspectives. Focus is on an in-depth treatment of a content area not typically represented in other courses in the major. May be repeated for credit. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as SPCH 5313. Three credit hours.

SPCH 4314 Internship
Prerequisites: SPCH 1300. An opportunity to apply communication concepts and skills in a professional setting within the department. Interns gain experience working in the Speech Communication Interactive Learning Center, assisting in its operation primarily with students in the basic course. Focus is on experiencing and analyzing communication in real-world situations. Contact the department’s basic course coordinator before enrolling in this course. Three credit hours.

SPCH 4315 Cooperative Education in Speech Communication
Prerequisite: SPCH 1300. An opportunity to apply communication concepts and skills in a professional setting outside the department. Focus us on experiencing and analyzing communication in real-world situations. Contact the department’s coordinator of cooperative education before enrolling in this course. Three credit hours.

SPCH 4323 Family Communication
Prerequisite: SPCH 1300. Examination of long-term relationships within a family context from a speech communication perspective, primarily examining behaviors that occur in a functional family. Topics include family rules and roles, conflict styles, power, and decision-making. Focus is on using major family communication theories and concepts to help the student analyze the communication system of a family and identify communication patterns, problems, and dilemmas in the families. Three credit hours.

SPCH 4324 Organizational Communication II
Prerequisite: SPCH 1300. Special topics in organizational communication including but not limited to organizational identification, risk and issue management, organizational change, or critical approaches to organizational communication. Focus on giving students an in-depth understanding of a specialized aspect of organizational communication. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as SPCH 5324. Three credit hours.

SPCH 4350 Effective Crisis Communication
This course investigates and analyzes instances of effective and ineffective crisis communication. Students will examine the internal organizational processes and the larger environment within which various organizations exist focusing on issues such as stakeholders, legal environments, and the larger social and cultural contexts. Three credit hours.

SPCH 4357 Communicating with Difference
This course explores communication and difference in such areas as race and ethnicity, social class, age, sexual orientation and disability. Through applying communication theories and ideas to our experiences in each of the targeted areas, we can emerge with tools to manage communication across lines of difference and create more positive social worlds. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as SPCH 5357. Three credit hours.

SPED – Special Education

SPED 4214 Early Childhood Special Education Assessment Field Experience
Prerequisites: Admission to the Early Childhood Education Program and eligible for admission to Block III with a 2.65 GPA or greater. This is the first experience in a series of two supervised field experiences. During the 120 clock hour experience, candidate field practice emphasizes assessment and early intervention assessment activities related to child find/screening, translating assessment into activities in the intervention environment and assessments surrounding health and safety issues, children with health and/or sensory impairments, social development, and challenging behavior. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as SPED 5214. Two credit hours.

SPED 4216 Early Childhood Special Education: Inclusion Field Experience
This is final experience in a series of supervised field experience designed for candidates in the Early Childhood Special Education emphasis. The experiences included in this 120 clock hour experience examine assessment to intervention activities related to all developmental domains, technology adaptations in intervention, the link between individualized intervention plans and instructional planning, and continuous documentation of child performance. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as SPED 5216. Two credit hours.

SPED 4301 Education of Exceptional Learners
Prerequisite: PSYC 2300 or consent of instructor. Introduction to the psychological, sociological, philosophical, legal, and educational implications of educating exceptional learners in the mainstream; the role of teachers, professionals, and parents as team members in providing appropriate education and necessary adaptations for exceptional learners. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as SPED 5301. Three credit hours.

SPED 4102, 4202, 4302 Workshop
Subjects vary. One, two, or three credit hours.

SPED 4306 Methods of Teaching Students with Mild Disabilities
Prerequisite: an introductory course in exceptional learners and/or characteristics of students with mild disabilities. Methods and materials for educating students with mild disabilities in regular and special education environments including behavior management, programming for secondary students with mild disabilities, career education, teacher-made materials, and commercially available materials appropriate for use with students with mild disabilities. Three credit hours.

SPED 4108, 4208, 4308 Independent Study
Prerequisite: consent of the department chairperson. An in-depth study of a selected problem or trend in special education for advanced students. One, two, or three credit hours.

SPED 4311 Behavior Management
Prerequisite: EDFN 2300. Positive approaches to behavior management. Students receive firsthand experience in using behavior analysis in field settings. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as SPED 5311. Three credit hours.

SPED 4312 Medical Problems in Child Development
Prerequisites: Admission to the Early Childhood Education Program and eligible for admission to Block III with a 2.65 GPA or greater. The primary concern of the course is to review medical conditions and events arising during prenatal, postnatal and early childhood which contribute to the nature and cause of major educational disabilities. Special attention is given to syndromes associated with mental retardation, disorders of the central nervous system, infections disease, and a wide range of conditions placing children at-risk for developmental delays. Emphasis is directed toward early medical identification, prevention of secondary disabilities, and strategies for responding to chronic health conditions in educational settings. Guest lectures by physicians and other health related professionals are an integral part of the course. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as SPED 5312. Three credit hours.

SPED 4313 Early Childhood Special Education Assessment
Prerequisites: Admission to the Early Childhood Education Program and eligible for admission to Block III with a 2.65 GPA or greater. The first course in a two-course sequence addressing assessment and early intervention screening and assessment strategies for young children with disabilities, from birth through age eight. A specific focus will be given to the fundamental principles of and strategies for assessment, the role of well-baby and early intervention providers in screening and assessment process for disabilities. Candidates will learn to identify the needs of children related to health and/or sensory impairments, the identification of abilities in the developmental domains. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as SPED 5313. Three credit hours.

SPED 4315 Early Childhood Special Education: Methods of Inclusion
Prerequisites: Admission to the Early Childhood Education Program and eligible for admission to Block III with a 2.65 GPA or greater. This is the second course in a two-course sequence addressing intervention strategies for young children with disabilities, from birth through age eight. Specific attention is given to application of assessment principles into programming, the role of child find in providing services, the needs of young children with health and/or sensory impairments, strategies for identifying behavioral support needs and techniques for fostering social-emotional development. Attention also will be given to methods of including children with disabilities in the general education setting. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as SPED 5315. Three credit hours.

SPED 4317 Introduction to Inclusion in Early Childhood Special Education
Prerequisites: PSYC 1300 or an introductory human development course, admission to the Early Childhood Education Program, and eligible for admission to Block III with a 2.65 GPA or greater; or consent of the instructor. Psychological, Sociological, philosophical, legal, educational implications of educating exceptional learners; necessary adaptations for exceptional learners in the mainstream setting; role of teachers, professionals, parents as team members providing education for exceptional learners. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as SPED 5317. Three credit hours.

STAT – Statistics

STAT 2350 Introduction to Statistical Methods
Prerequisite: MATH 1302 or 1315 or 1321 or equivalent. Introduction to the fundamental ideas of statistics, including descriptive statistics, normal distributions, sampling experiments, tests of hypotheses, and elementary probability. This course cannot be applied as upper-level credit toward a major in mathematics. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

STAT 3350 Introduction to Probability
Prerequisite: a grade of C or greater in MATH 1452. Combinatorial theory, random variables, continuous and discrete distributions, expected value, jointly distributed random variables, conditional expectation, law of large numbers, central limit theorem. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

STAT 3351 Statistical Inference
Prerequisite: a grade of C or greater in STAT 3350. Point estimation, interval estimation, tests of statistical hypotheses, distribution free methods, regression, order statistics. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

STAT 3352 Applied Statistics I
Prerequisite: a grade of C or greater in either MATH 1451 or 1311. Measures of central tendency and variation, probability distributions, sampling distributions, tests of hypotheses, confidence intervals. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

STAT 3353 Applied Statistics II
Prerequisites: a grade of C or greater in STAT 3352; knowledge of a scientific programming language. Analysis of variance, factorial experiments, unequal subclasses, multiple regression and correlation, analysis of covariance, uses of chi-square tests, tests of independence, goodness of fit. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

STAT 4352 Distribution-Free Statistical Methods
Prerequisite: a grade of C or greater in STAT 3352 or its equivalent. Comparison of classical and distribution-free tests of hypotheses, test assumptions, efficiency and related characteristics, Fisher’s method of randomization, ranking tests, tests based on the binomial distribution. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

STAT 4354 Design and Analysis of Experiments
Prerequisite: STAT 3351. Factorial experiments, randomized block designs, Latin squares, Graeco-Latin squares, analysis of covariance, incomplete block designs, distribution-free methods. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

SYEN – Systems Engineering

SYEN 1207 Introduction to Mechanical Engineering
Prerequisite: none. The mechanical engineering profession; problem solving skills; machine components and tools; forces in structures and fluids, materials and stresses; thermal and energy systems; motion of machinery; mechanical design. Required for SYEN students in the mechanical option, but open to all students on a space available basis. Two hours lecture. Two credit hours.

SYEN 1210 Introduction to Systems Engineering
Prerequisite: MATH 1302 or 1315, or consent of instructor. Introduction to engineering as a profession, engineering problem solving, engineering design process, engineering ethics, engineering communication, history of engineering developments, and case studies involving leading inventions in the engineering field from a variety of disciplines. Students work in teams to build small engineering projects. Course includes industry visits and talks by industry specialists. One hour lecture. Two hours lab. Two credit hours.

SYEN 1301 Introduction to Computer Systems
Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Introduction to the fundamental hardware and software underpinning of computing systems, MOS transistors, logic gates, latches, logic structure, memory, von Neumann model of execution, organization and architecture of a simple computer; machine, assembly, and high-level language programming. Required for systems engineering students in the computer systems option, but open to all students on a space-available basis. Four hours lab. Two hours lecture, two hours lab. Three credit hours.

SYEN 1302 C/C++ Programming for Engineers and Scientists
Introduction to programming and problem solving with science and engineering applications. Program design methodology. Elements of C: variables, control structures, input/output, functions, storage classes. Arrays: one-dimensional, two- dimensional arrays, array pointers, dynamic storage for arrays. Declaration and definition of structure variables. Object oriented design and programming. Abstract data types. Elements of C++: classes, data members and member functions, access specifiers, access methods. Constructors and destructors. Arrays: One-dimensional and two-dimensional arrays, dynamic storage for arrays. Operator overloading. Inheritance: base class and derived class. Polymorphism: abstract class and virtual functions. Function template and template classes. Two hours lecture, two hours lab. Three credit hours.

SYEN 1303 Introduction to Telecommunication Systems
Prerequisite: Math 1303 or equivalent. Source coding, Line Coding, Multiplexing and Multiple Access, Analog and digital modulation, fundamentals of Information theory and coding. Required for systems engineering students in the telecommunication systems option, but open to all students on a space- available basis. Two hours lecture, two hours lab. Three credit hours.

SYEN 1304 Introduction to Electrical Engineering
Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Direct current fundamentals; alternating current and components; electrical and electronic component functions; digital logic devices; computer architecture; computer components; semiconductors; the load line; CMOS logic and memory; other semiconductor devices and circuits; fabrication of ICs and MEMS; power generation, transmission, and distribution; wireless communication systems; digital signal processing; electronics terminology. Required for systems engineering students in the computer systems in the students in the electrical systems option, but open to all students on a space-available basis. Two hours lecture. Two hours lab. Three credit hours.

SYEN 1310 Introduction to Systems Engineering
Prerequisite: MATH 1302 or 1315 or consent of instructor. Introduction to engineering as a profession, engineering problem solving, engineering design process, engineering ethics, engineering communication, history of engineering developments, and case studies involving leading inventions in the engineering field from a variety of disciplines. Students work in teams to build small engineering projects. Course includes industry visits and talks by industry specialists. Two hours lecture. Two hours lab. Three credit hours.

SYEN 2110 Computational Engineering Laboratory
Prerequisite concurrent: SYEN 1302 or consent of instructor. Introduction to engineering problem solving using Matlab, vector and matrix operations, data input and output, program flow control, Matlab functions, graphics in 2D and 3D, symbolic mathematics, engineering examples. Three hours lab. One credit hour.

SYEN 2115 Circuits and Systems Laboratory
Prerequisite or corequisite: SYEN 2315. Structured exercises to illustrate class topics. Both SPICE simulation and bread-boarding/measurement exercises. Use of spectrum analyzer to determine frequency response and system identification. Two hours lab. One credit hour.

SYEN 2117 Manufacturing Processes Laboratory
Prerequisite or corequisite: ETME 2317 or SYEN 1207. Introduction to machine shop equipment and processes; metal fabricating applications, including metal cutting, such as turning, drilling, milling; welding, and measurement and inspection, Course project and the application of Ethics and safety in design and manufacturing, One three-hour lab, One credit hour.

SYEN 2233 Solid Modeling and Design
Prerequisite: SYEN 2117 or equivalent. Modern engineers use computer aided design and engineering (CAD/CAE) programs to improve the design process. This course will introduce the concepts of three-dimensional part modeling and assembly for analysis and manufacturing. The principle method for design communication is through two-dimensional standard drawing practices which can be easily extracted from three-dimensional models. This course will cover the basic nomenclature to allow engineers to communicate with manufacturers. Some focus will be applied to the intersection of tolerances, as expressed on engineering drawings, with design and manufacturing processes. The course will introduce how to interface solid models with CAE simulations, such as a Finite Element Analysis program. One hour lecture, two hours lab. Two credit hours.

SYEN 2310 Systems Modeling – Discrete
Prerequisite: MATH 1452. Introduction to dynamic modeling, converting real world problems into mathematical models, discrete dynamical system models with examples from natural sciences, social sciences, and engineering, systems with inputs, probabilistic modeling with discrete systems. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

SYEN 2315 Circuits and Systems
Prerequisite or Corequisite: PHYS 2322 and MATH 3322. DC and AC circuits. Electrical units. Passive linear components including resistor, capacitor, inductor. Basic circuit laws. Thevenin and Norton equivalent circuits. Transient and frequency domain analysis of linear circuits. Power and power transfer in circuits. Impedances. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

SYEN 2370 Engineering Statics
Prerequisite: PHYS 2321 or consent of instructor. Prerequisite concurrent: MATH 2453 or consent of instructor. Static equilibrium of particles, equivalent systems of forces, equilibrium of rigid bodies, centroids and centers of gravity, analysis of structures, dry friction, and moments of inertia. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

SYEN 3110 Dynamic Systems Modeling and Simulation Laboratory
Prerequisite or corequisite: SYEN 3310. Modeling and simulation of dynamic systems on personal computers. Introduction to computer modeling. Graphical presentation of results. Two hours lab. One credit hour.

SYEN 3130 Digital Systems Laboratory
Prerequisite or corequisite: SYEN 3330. Weekly laboratory providing practical knowledge in designing, assembling, testing, and simulating combinational and sequential digital circuits. Two hours lab. One credit hour.

SYEN 3134 Advanced Microprocessor Systems Laboratory
Prerequisite or corequisite: SYEN 3334. Laboratory course to accompany SYEN 3334 Advanced Microprocessor Systems. Two hours lab. One credit hour.

SYEN 3150 Signals and Systems Laboratory
Prerequisite or corequisite: SYEN 3350. Laboratory course to accompany SYEN 3350 Signals and Systems. Two hours lab. One credit hour.

SYEN 3152 Digital and Analog and Electronics Laboratory
Prerequisite or corequisite: SYEN 3352. Laboratory course to accompany SYEN 3352 Analog and Digital Electronics. Two hours lab. One credit hour.

SYEN 3154 Digital and Analog Communications Laboratory
Prerequisite or corequisite: SYEN 3354. Weekly laboratory experiments to accompany Communication Systems I. Two hours lab. One credit hour.

SYEN 3158 Power Systems Laboratory
Prerequisites: SYEN 2315 and 2115. This lab is designed to accompany SYEN 3358. The lab includes the tests of transformers, DC and AC motors, and power electronic systems. Two hours lecture. One credit hour.

SYEN 3301 Engineering Economy
Prerequisite: MATH 1311, 1342 or 1451, or consent of instructor. Introduction to engineering economic decisions for evaluating the worth of products, services, projects and systems; time value of money, economic equivalence concepts, comparison of investment alternatives, evaluating economic life and replacement analysis, inflation, depreciation and impact of taxes on engineering decisions, and economic risk analysis. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours. Cross listed as CNMG 3302.

SYEN 3310 Dynamic Systems Modeling and Simulation
Prerequisites: MATH 3312 and 3322. Introduction to mathematical modeling of dynamic systems, continuous and discrete system models, system response in time and frequency domains, transfer functions, stability characterization, state- space formulation of modeling problems, fitting models to data, examples from sciences and engineering. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

SYEN 3312 Optimization Methods in Systems Engineering
Prerequisites: MATH 2453 and 3312, SYEN 2110. Mathematical foundations, optimality criteria for unconstrained and constrained problems, one-dimensional search methods, gradient and Newtonian methods, linear programming, non-linear programming, discrete optimization, advanced techniques. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

SYEN 3314 Probability Theory and Random Variables
Prerequisite or concurrent: MATH 2453. Sample space and events, axioms of probability, conditional probability, independence, Bayes’ rule, discrete and continuous random variables and probability distributions, joint probability distributions, random sampling, limit theorems, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, introduction to random processes. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

SYEN 3316 Discrete Event Systems Modeling and Simulation
Prerequisites: SYEN 3314. The theory and practice of discrete-event simulation modeling and analysis, discrete-event dynamic systems (DEDS), simulation logic and data structures, random number generation, computational issues, experiment design, output analysis, model verification and validation, and modern simulation languages including animation. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

SYEN 3318 Decision and Risk Analysis
Prerequisite: SYEN 3312 and 3314. A study in analytic techniques for rational decision-making. Address uncertainty, conflicting objectives, and risk attitudes. Modeling uncertainty; rational decision-making principles; representing decision problems with value trees, decision trees, and influence diagrams; solving value hierarchies, decision trees and influence diagrams; defining and calculating the value of information; incorporating risk attitudes into the analysis; and conducting sensitivity analyses. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

SYEN 3320 Systems Engineering Design and Analysis
Prerequisite: SYEN 3312. An integrated introduction to systems design, analysis, and management. The steps of the systems engineering life-cycle process, including identification of system requirements, system concept, engineering design, system testing and integration, and system operation and support. Presentation of basic systems analysis tools, including decision-making, economic evaluation, modeling and simulation, and statistical process control. Elements of systems engineering program management and evaluation. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

SYEN 3330 Digital Systems
Prerequisites: SYEN 1302 and 2315. An introduction to digital system design necessary to do modern digital design. Exposure to a balanced treatment of logic design, digital system design, and computer system design basics. New paradigms that cover classical topics and integrate modern technology into the discussion for a real-world viewpoint of modern computer systems. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

SYEN 3332 Communication Networks
Prerequisite or corequisite: SYEN 3314. Comprehensive study of the major communication networks. Essentials of communication engineering. Circuit switching networks. Packet switching networks. OSI model. TCP/IP model. Connection and connectionless applications. LAN and WAN. SONET. ATM. Quality of service (QoS). Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

SYEN 3334 Advanced Microprocessor Systems
Prerequisite: SYEN 3330. The 80×86 Intel series of microprocessors (from the 8086 to the Pentium members of the series). Principles of microprocessor system design. Architecture of microprocessors, memory interfacing, assembly language programming, I/O programming, I/O peripheral devices, I/O interface design, and data communications. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

SYEN 3336 Computer Architecture
Prerequisites: SYEN 3330, or consent of the instructor. The evolution of computers, design methodology, processor basics, data path and control design, memory organization, and system organization. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

SYEN 3350 Signals and Systems
Prerequisites: MATH 3322 and corequisites MATH 2453. Linear system theory, convolution, sampling theorem, Fourier series representation, Laplace transform, Fourier transform, digital filtering. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

SYEN 3351 Network Analysis
Prerequisites: SYEN 2315 and 2115. Basic circuit laws; circuit analysis methods; capacitive and inductive transients and equivalent circuits; initial, final, and first- order circuits; Laplace transforms; circuit analysis with Laplace transforms; transfer functions; sinusoidal steady-state analysis; frequency response analysis and Bode plots; waveform analysis; Fourier analysis. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours

SYEN 3352 Analog and Digital Electronics
Prerequisites: SYEN 2315 and 2115. Electronic systems; measurement sensors and actuators; amplification; feedback; semiconductors and diodes; field effect transistors; bipolar junction transistors; analog signal processing; digital systems; sequential logic; digital devices; microcomputers; data acquisition and conversion; system design. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

SYEN 3354 Digital and Analog Communication
Prerequisites: SYEN 3350, corequisite 3314. Introduction to communication systems, signals and spectra, signal transmission over communication channels, filtering, linear and exponential CW modulation, sampling, pulse modulation, random signals, noise in communication systems. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

SYEN 3356 Electromagnetic Fields and Waves
Prerequisites: SYEN 2315 and MATH 2453. Vector algebra and vector calculus; electrostatics, magnetostatics, Maxwell’s equations for time-varying fields, plane- wave propagation; transmission lines; wave reflection and transmission; radiation and antennas. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

SYEN 3358 Fundamentals of Power Systems
Prerequisite: SYEN 2315. Electrical machines: generators, motors, and transformers; electrical and electronic drives: motor control and power electronics; electric utility power systems: generation, transmission, distribution, and utilization of electricity. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

SYEN 3362 Algorithm Design
Prerequisite: SYEN 1302. Design, analysis, and implementation of algorithms important to computer systems and telecommunication systems; algorithmic design patterns and frameworks; data structures; combinatorial algorithms; graph algorithms; geometric algorithms; numerical algorithms; and internet algorithms, including text processing, cryptography, and network algorithms. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

SYEN 3364 Introduction to Control Systems Engineering
Prerequisite: MATH 3322. Introduction to feedback digital control systems, PID control, continuous modeling of physical systems, application of integral transforms to control system design and analysis, transfer functions, block diagrams, control system characteristics, stability analysis, performance criteria, frequency response methods. Three hours lecture. Three credit hour.

SYEN 3370 Statics and Dynamics
Prerequisite: PHYS 2321 or consent of instructor. Prerequisite concurrent: MATH 2453 or consent of instructor. Statics of particles, equivalent systems of forces, equilibrium of rigid bodies, centroids and centers of gravity, analysis of structures, friction, moments of inertia, kinematics and kinetics of particles, introduction to kinematics and kinetics of rigid bodies, forces and accelerations. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours. Cross listed as CNMG 3370.

SYEN 3371 Engineering Dynamics
Prerequisite: SYEN 2370 or consent of instructor. Kinematics and kinetics of particles, systems of particles, and rigid bodies; energy and momentum methods; mechanical vibrations and resonance; introduction to structural dynamics due to time-varying loads, such as wind and seismic loading. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

SYEN 3372 Engineering Materials
Prerequisites: CHEM 1402 and MATH 1451. Atomic structure and bonding, crystal structures, crystal geometry, solidification, crystalline imperfections, and diffusion in solids, mechanical properties of metals, polymeric materials, phase diagrams, engineering alloys, ceramics, composite materials, corrosion, electrical properties of materials, optical properties and superconductive materials, magnetic materials. Cross-listed with CNMG 3372. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

SYEN 3378 Engineering Thermodynamics
Prerequisites: CHEM 1402, PHYS 2321, and MATH 1452, or consent of instructor. Properties of pure substances, thermodynamic processes, heat and work, the first law of thermodynamics, closed systems, enthalpy, open systems, the second law of thermodynamics, entropy, exergy, and an introduction to power and refrigeration cycles. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours. Cross listed as CNMG 3378.

SYEN 3379 Elements of Mechanical Design
Prerequisites: SYEN 2233 and CNMG 3376 or equivalent with a grade of C or better. Introduction to the design, integration, and best practices for using mechanical elements such as springs, gears, cams and mechanisms, clutches and brakes, and bearings. Methods of joining such as fasteners, welds, press and shrink fits, and shaft coupling will be covered. Performance and failure analysis for components and machines will be covered. Solid modeling of machine assemblies for documentation and basic analysis will be emphasized. A semester-long design project in which a mechanical system is designed, fabricated, and characterized will serve as the practical application of these concepts. Two hours lecture, four hours lab. Three credit hours.

SYEN 3391 Cooperative Education in Systems Engineering I
Prerequisites: declaration of systems engineering major, completion of at least 60 hours total credit hours with an overall GPA of 2.5 or higher, completion of 20 or more credit hours of systems engineering courses with a GPA of 2.5 or higher, and permission of the systems engineering cooperative education faculty coordinator. This course is for qualified students who would like to combine classroom study with at least 200 hours of engineering-related paid employment. The course is a partnership between the student, the employer, the systems engineering faculty, and the UALR Office of Cooperative Education. An individualized Cooperative Education Learning Agreement will specify the detailed work assignment, including employer, supervisor, job title, work schedule, and rate of pay, as well as the academic requirements, including learning objectives, learning activities, documentation of learning, learning assessments, and grading policy. This course will be allowed to satisfy up to six hours of program electives. Three credit hours.

SYEN 4100, 4200, 4300, 4400, 4500 Independent Study
Prerequisite: Senior standing. Individual investigation by an upper level student. Topics determined in consultation with supervising faculty. For each credit hour, the student is expected to work two to four hours per week as determined by the instructor. Agreement must be in writing and filed with the department chairperson. A maximum of six credit hours can be applied toward the SYEN major requirement. One to five credit hours.

SYEN 4174 Fluid Mechanics Laboratory
Prerequisite or corequisite: SYEN 4374. Analysis of experimental data, basic electrical measurements and sensing devices, pressure measurement, flow measurement, temperature measurement, data acquisition and processing, report writing and presentation, design of experiments. Cross-listed with CNMG 4174. Two hours lab. One credit hour.

SYEN 4176 Mechanics of Materials Laboratory
Prerequisite or corequisite: SYEN 4376. Analysis of experimental data, basic electrical measurements and sensing devices, force measurement, torque measurement, strain measurement, motion measurement, vibration measurement, data acquisition and processing, report writing and presentation, design of experiments. Two hours lab. One credit hour. Cross listed as CNMG 4176.

SYEN 4182 MEMS and Microsystems Laboratory
Prerequisites: SYEN 4376 and 4176 or consent of instructor. This laboratory course is an introduction to the principles of microfabrication for microelectronic devices, sensors, and micromechanical structures, MEMS, and microsystems with applications in engineering. Course comprised of laboratory work and accompanying lectures that cover silicon oxidation, photolithography, thin film deposition, etching, electrochemical deposition (plating) and packaging. Some selected topics in yield and reliability, as well as process simulation may be covered. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as SYEN 5182. Two hours lab. One credit hour.

SYEN 4282 MEMS and Microsystems
Prerequisite: SYEN 3372 or equivalent with a grade of C or higher. Corequisite SYEN 4182. In this introductory MEMS class, we cover the fundamental basis of Microsystems technology. Microelectromechanical devices (MEMS), such as actuators, pressure sensors, and opto-mechanical assemblies, require knowledge of a broad range of disciplines, from microfabrication and mechanics to chemistry and solid state device physics. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as SYEN 5282. Two hours lecture. Two credit hours

SYEN 4314 Queuing Theory and Systems
Prerequisite: SYEN 3314 or equivalent. Theoretical foundations, models and techniques or queuing theory. Topics include classic models of queues including simple and advanced Markovian queuing models, and models with general arrival and service patterns. Applications of queuing theory and queuing systems design considerations. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as SYEN 5314. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

SYEN 4320 Linear State-Space Control Systems
Prerequisites: SYEN 3364 or consent of instructor. Introduction to modem control systems, state-space models of linear time-invariant systems, solution to state equations, linear transformations and canonical forms, stability analysis, controller synthesis via state feedback, tracking system design, observer-based compensator design, optimal control problems. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as SYEN 5320. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

SYEN 4322 Modeling Transportation Systems
Prerequisites: SYEN 3312 or equivalent, SYEN 3314 or equivalent, or Consent of Instructor. The objectives of transportation analysis are defined to include mobility provision, consequence identification and selection of courses of action. A set of methodologies has evolved to exclusively address transport modeling, including demand forecasting, technology representation, network-flow, and multi-attribute assessment of performance. This course reviews very powerful tools to analyze such a class of technological and socioeconomic problems, characterized by the explicit recognition of a spatial dimension. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as SYEN 5322. Three lecture hours. Three credit hours.

SYEN 4325 Fuzzy Logic in Control and Systems Engineering
Prerequisite: SYEN 3364. Introduction, basic concepts of fuzzy logic, fuzzy sets, fuzzy relations, fuzzy If/Then rules, fuzzy implications and approximate reasoning, fuzzy logic in control theory, hierarchical intelligent control, fuzzy logic applications in information systems, fuzzy model identification, neuro- fuzzy systems and genetic algorithms. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as SYEN 5325. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

SYEN 4331 Advanced Computer Architecture
Prerequisites: SYEN 3336, or consent of the instructor. Introduction to Computer Systems, Instruction-Set architecture, Arithmetic/Logic Unit, Data Path and Control, Memory System Design, I/O Interface, and Advanced Architectures. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as SYEN 5331. Three hours lecture. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

SYEN 4332 Applied Operating Systems
Prerequisite or corequisite: SYEN 3362. Introduction to operating systems. Buffering, physical input/output, and file management. Multiprogramming and processing, resource scheduling, memory management, concept of virtual memory. Process management and scheduling. Device management and scheduling. Process communication, network communication, and protection. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as SYEN 5332.

SYEN 4334 Software System Engineering
Prerequisite: SYEN 3362. Engineering approach to the development of software systems, including the life cycle steps of project planning, requirements analysis and specification, design, production, testing, and maintenance of software systems. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

SYEN 4336 Advances in Communication Networks
Prerequisites: SYEN 3312, 3316, and 3332. Essentials of S-ISDN, InteServ, MPLS, DiffServ. Advances in optical networks, wireless networks, satellite networks, sensor networks, ad hoc networks, access networks, and autonomous networks. Modeling and optimization of networks. Communication switch OS. Elementary queuing theory. Security issues. OPNET training. Socket programming. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as SYEN 5336.

SYEN 4340 Applied Numerical Methods
Prerequisite: MATH 3312 and 3322. MATLAB fundamentals and programming, roundoff and truncation errors, roots of equations, systems of linear algebraic equations, curve fitting, polynomial interpolation, numerical integration, ordinary differential equations, and eigenvalues. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as SYEN 5340.

SYEN 4342 Linear Program and Network Flows
Prerequisite: SYEN 3312 or equivalent, or Consent of Instructor. This course covers salient linear optimization topics, including computational issues such as decomposition, LU factorization, and network flow. Of equal interest is the equivalence between the network flow paradigm and discrete optimization of a model and its solution algorithms. The relationship between the network flow paradigm and discrete optimization is also emphasized. Software libraries are available to solve linear optimization models. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as SYEN 5342. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

SYEN 4329 Robust and Optimal Control
Prerequisite: SYEN 4320. Fundamentals of linear systems, signal and system spaces, power and spectral norms, feedback structure, internal stability, coprime factorization, Bode’s gain and phase relations, observability, controllability, balanced realizations, model reduction, model uncertainty, small gain theorem, controller parameterization, existence of stabilizing controllers, H2 optimal control, synthesis of state feedback via LMIs, and H‱ control, and uncertain systems. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as SYEN 5329. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

SYEN 4350 Digital Signal Processing
Prerequisites: SYEN 3350. Signals and signal processing; discrete-time signals and systems in the time and frequency domains; digital processing of continuous-time signals; finite-length discrete transforms; discrete-time signals and systems in the z-domain; LTI discrete-time systems in the transform domain; digital filter structures; IIR digital filter design; FIR digital filter design; DSP algorithm implementation; analysis of finite word-length effects; multi-rate DSP fundamentals; multi-rate filter banks and wavelets; applications of DSP. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

SYEN 4352 Spatial Time Series
Prerequisites: SYEN 3312, SYEN 3314 or STAT 3353, and consent of instructor. Instead of a single stream of data, multiple streams are gathered over the target can provide better information. Because of the inherent spatial correlation among these data streams, spatial time-series can play an important role in multiple- sensor and other data-intensive applications. Image-processing applications include image rectification and restoration, image enhancement, image classification, and data merging. Signal processing applications include Spatial- temporal Autoregressive Moving-Average model and Intervention Analysis. Unifying these diverse analyses and applications is Markov Random Field Theory. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as SYEN 5352. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

SYEN 4353 Advanced Digital Communications
Prerequisites: SYEN 3154 and 3354. In-depth examination of wireless digital communication design strategies. Topics covered include digital modulation, radiowave propagation characteristics. Signal detection methods, BER performance improvement and simulation techniques RF/hardware architectures, migration path for modulation and demodulation techniques, signal processing building blocks for wireless systems, method for mitigating wireless channel impairments, perform system simulations, BER and channel models, predict system performance and evaluate trade-offs, list TDMA and CDMA techniques, and 3G evolution, describe design issues for wireless systems, particularly those issue in which transmit and receive implementation affect system performance. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as SYEN 5353. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

SYEN 4354 Power Systems Analysis
Prerequisites: SYEN 3358, or consent of the instructor. Fundamental concepts of power system analysis, transmission line parameters, system models, steady-state performance, network calculations, power flow solutions, fault studies, symmetrical components, operation, and control. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as SYEN 5354. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

SYEN 4355 Mobile Multimedia Internet
Prerequisites: SYEN 3314. The course will provide state-of-the-art perspective of the emerging landscape of Mobile Multimedia Internet. Key subject areas covered in advanced mobile internet technologies include WLAN, GPRS, 3G UMTS, and VoIP. Topics covered will involve architecture of the systems, protocol issues, the design and analysis of solutions for mobility, quality of service, mobile IP, and standardization efforts. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

SYEN 4356 Radio Frequency Techniques and Systems
Prerequisites: SYEN 3356. Analysis of electrostatic, magnetostatic, and dynamic fields using vector analysis. Coulomb’s Law, electric field intensity, electric flux density, Gauss’ Law. Energy and potential. Conductors, dielectrics, and capacitance. Poisson’s and Laplace’s equations. The steady magnetic field magnetic forces, materials, and inductance. Time-varying fields and Maxwell’s equations. Boundary conditions. The uniform plane wave. Plane waves at boundaries and in dispersive media. Transmission lines and antenna fundamentals. Examples are taken from the field of wireless communications. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as SYEN 5356.

SYEN 4358 Cellular and Wireless Communications
Prerequisites: SYEN 3354 and SYEN 3314. Characteristics of mobile radio environment, multi-path and fading, cellular communication concepts, channel allocation and reuse, access and scheduling techniques, system capacity, power control, diversity, coding, modulation in cellular systems, examples of digital wireless systems, wireless local area networks. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

SYEN 4359 Optical Networking
Prerequisite: SYEN 4355 or consent of instructor. Fundamental concepts of networking, optical networks elements and devices, SONET, WDM, DWDM, optical control plane, MPLS and GMPLS. Free Space Optical Mesh Networks. Three credit hours.

SYEN 4362 Neural Networks & Adaptive Systems
Prerequisites: SYEN 3312 or consent of the instructor. Introduction to neural networks, neuron models and learning strategies, pattern recognition, multi-layer perception, back propagation, principle component analysis, self-organizing feature maps, neural networks for time series-forecasting. Dual-listed in UALR Undergraduate Catalog as SYEN 5362. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

SYEN 4366 Advanced Digital Systems
Prerequisites: SYEN 3330 and 3130. Advanced design principles for digital systems. Hardware modeling in the hardware description language VHDL (Verilog Hardware Description Language), compilation techniques for hardware models, and logic-level synthesis and optimization techniques for combinational and sequential circuits. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as SYEN 5366. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

SYEN 4374 Fluid Mechanics
Prerequisites: PHYS 2321, MATH 3322, Corequisite: SYEN 3378. Properties of fluids, pressure and fluid statics, fluid kinematics, Bernoulli and energy equations, momentum, dimensional analysis, flow in pipes, differential analysis, approximations of the Navier-Stokes equation, drag and lift, compressible flow, open-channel flow, turbomachinery, computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Three hours lecture. Three credit hours. Cross listed as CNMG 4374.

SYEN 4375 Mechanical Vibration
Prerequisite: SYEN 3370 or consent of instructor. Analysis of linear multi-degree of freedom systems. Lagrangian formulation, model analysis, lumped parameter analysis of discrete systems, and continuous system vibrations. Introduction to non-linear systems. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

SYEN 4376 Mechanics of Materials
Prerequisites: SYEN 3370 and 3372. Stress, strain, axial loading, torsion, pure bending, analysis and design of beams, shearing stresses in beams and thin- walled members, transformation of stress and strain, principal stresses, deflection of beams, columns, energy methods. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours. Cross listed as CNMG 4376.

SYEN 4379 Heat Transfer
Prerequisite: SYEN 4374 or consent of instructor. Steady and transient heat conduction; forced, natural, and multi-phase convection; heat exchanger design and analysis; radiation heat transfer; mass transfer. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours. Cross listed as CNMG 4379.

SYEN 4380 HVACR Engineering Fundamentals
Prerequisite: CNMG 2274 or SYEN/CNMG 3378, or consent of instructor. Fundamentals of heating, ventilating, air-conditioning, and refrigeration (HVACR) engineering; refrigeration cycles; psychometrics; indoor air quality and ventilation; heating and cooling loads. Two hours lecture. Two hours lab. Three credit hours. Cross listed as CNMG 4380.

SYEN 4381 Thermal Powerplant Engineering
Prerequisite: CNMG 2274 or SYEN/CNMG 3378, or consent of instructor. Thermodynamics of combustion and power cycles; internal combustion engines; steam turbine powerplants; gas turbine powerplants; combined cycle powerplants; introduction to alternative energy systems. Two hours lecture. Two hours lab. Three credit hours. Dual-listed in UALR Graduate Catalog as SYEN 5381.

SYEN 4383 Finite Element Analysis
Prerequisite: SYEN 3378 and 4376. Basic concepts of the finite element method (FEM); stiffness matrices, spring and bar elements; truss structures, the direct stiffness method; flexure elements; method of weighted residuals; interpolation functions for general element formulation; applications in heat transfer, fluid mechanics, and solid mechanics; structural dynamics. Dual-listed in UALR Graduate Catalog as SYEN 5383. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

SYEN 4384 Computer Methods in Fluids and Heat Transfer
Prerequisite: SYEN 4374, or with instructor’s consent. Modeling and simulation of thermal-fluid problems using commercial software, finite volume method, solution algorithms for pressure-velocity coupling, solution of discretized equations, unsteady flows, uncertainty in CFD modeling, methods for dealing with complex geometrics, modeling of combustion, heat transfer, and unsteady flows. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

SYEN 4385 Systems Engineering Capstone Design I
Prerequisite: completion of at least 40 credit hours of SYEN courses. First semester of systems engineering capstone design sequence. Focuses on the requirements definition process and involves designing a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability, using appropriate engineering standards. Students work in multidisciplinary teams on system engineering design projects and make formal written and oral presentations of their preliminary work. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

SYEN 4386 Systems Engineering Capstone Design II
Prerequisite: SYEN 4385. Second semester of systems engineering capstone design sequence. Focuses on the solution definition process and involves designing a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability, using appropriate engineering standards. Students work in multidisciplinary teams on system engineering design projects and make formal written and oral presentations of their preliminary work. Two hours lecture, two hours lab. Three credit hours.

SYEN 4389 Professional Engineering Licensure
Prerequisite concurrent: Senior standing and registration for the Fundamentals of Engineering exam, or consent of instructor. Legal, regulatory, and ethical issues related to the practice of engineering; preparation for engineering licensure examinations. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours. Cross listed as CNMG 4389.

SYEN 4391 Cooperative Education in Systems Engineering II
Prerequisites: SYEN 3391, an overall GPA of 2.5 or higher, completion of 40 or more credit hours of systems engineering courses with a GPA of 2.5 or higher, and permission of the systems engineering cooperative education faculty coordinator. This course is for qualified students who would like to combine classroom study with at least 200 hours of engineering-related paid employment. The course is a partnership between the student, the employer, the systems engineering faculty, and the UALR Office of Cooperative Education. An individualized Cooperative Education Learning Agreement will specify the detailed work assignment, including employer, supervisor, job title, work schedule, and rate of pay, as well as the academic requirements, including learning objectives, learning activities, documentation of learning, learning assessments, and grading policy. This course will be allowed to satisfy up to six hours of program electives. Three credit hours.

SYEN 4199, 4299, 4399, 4499 Special Topics
Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Advanced specialized topics of current interest in systems engineering. Topics vary with faculty interest and availability. Dual- listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as SYEN 5199, 5299, 5399, 5499. One, two, three, or four hours lecture. One, two, three, or four credit hours.

TCED – Teacher Education

TCED 1100 Introduction to Teaching and Learning
This course satisfies the First-Year Course requirements for first-year students and is an introduction to teaching and learning in American elementary and secondary schools. The course is open for all first-time students, but is especially applicable for those who may be considering a major or minor in education and teaching as a career. The course includes introductions to the field of education, current issues in teaching and learning in schools, and a service-learning project involving the teaching and learning of school-age students in the Little Rock area

TCED 1104 Introduction to K-12 Computing
An organized approach to computing practices for K-12 educators. One credit hour.

TCED 1200 Orientation to Teaching
Provide opportunities for students to observe in educational settings at the early childhood (preschool and primary levels) and middle childhood/early adolescence levels. Acquisition of understanding of the nature of the profession and its responsibilities to determine whether they are prepared to make a commitment to this profession. Students assisted in completing applications to licensure programs during this semester, should they decide to continue. Two credit hours.

TCED 3250 Computer Applications in Middle School
Prerequisite: TCED 1104. Applications of technology in the educational setting with specific emphasis on integrating instructional technology into the middle school curriculum. Two credit hours.

TCED 4100, 4200, 4300 Workshop
Prerequisite: consent of instructor (based on student’s experience and course work in the educational area). Designed to provide an opportunity for pre-service and in-service teachers to explore areas of interest and prepare educational materials through a workshop format. One, two, or three credit hours.

TCED 4104 Electronic Portfolio Development
Prerequisites: LSTE 3105 and 3106. The technology skills needed to develop an electronic portfolio. Each student required to demonstrate design skills for incorporating audio, visuals, and motion. Each student produces an electronic portfolio utilizing a current computer multimedia software program and translate or convert that product into language compatible with the World Wide Web. LSTE 4104 is a part of the professional semester of the early childhood education program. Students enrolling in this course must be admitted to the professional semester. One credit hour.

TCED 4301 Introduction to Instructional Technology
Prerequisite: EDFN 2300. The selection, use, and creation of 10 different types of fundamental media software found in today’s educational institutions. The student is required to teach a single unit using media created within the media center laboratory. Three credit hours.

TCED 4320 Interactive Technology for Middle School
The production and application of Interactive Instructional units where the microcomputer is the controlling medium for such peripherals as CD-ROM players and web browsers. Three credit hours.

TCED 4600 Clinical Experience/Student Teaching
Prerequisites: 12 credit hours of education courses at UALR, admission to the professional semester. Provides supervised experience in school settings during which the student participates in planning classroom activities. During the semester, students return to campus periodically for additional lectures and demonstrations to refine instructional skills necessary for effective teaching. Six credit hours.

TDHH – Teaching Students who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing

TDHH 4301 Foundations of Education for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students
This foundations course is a broad‐based introductory course to the profession of teaching students who are deaf or hard of hearing. This course articulates the historical background, philosophical approaches, and current trends, problems, and issues in the education of the deaf and hard of hearing. An overview of the psychological, emotional, and educational problems of the deaf and hard of hearing is included. Knowledge of contemporary educational processes and programs for deaf or hard of hearing infants, children, and adolescents are incorporated into the course content. Dual‐ listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as TDHH 5301. Three credit hours.

THEA – Theatre

THEA 1201 Theatre/Dance
A First Experience This course is designed for individuals considering majoring in theatre or dance. It serves as an introduction to the discipline, the profession, career options, and theatre as a “way of knowing.” Moreover, the course is tied to the specific identity of the department at UALR, and the faculty at the time the course is offered. Two credit hours.

THEA 1310 Introduction to Theatrical Design
To introduce the student to the conceptualized aesthetic approaches utilized in the creation of the visual and aural world of theatre production. Through hands-on creative endeavor that utilizes critical thinking, students will investigate how costume and makeup, scenery and props, lighting, and sound amplify and underpin the collaborative vision of a play. Three credit hours.

THEA 2305 Introduction to Theatre & Dance
An exploration of the components of the creative process as related to the making of theatre and dance. The purpose of this study is to develop in students an understanding of the theatrical experience. Attendance at arts events is required. Three credit hours. (ACTS Course Number DRAM 1003)

THEA 2310 Costume Techniques
An exploration of craft skills used for costume construction including work with patterns, fabric, stitching and garment execution. Three credit hours.

THEA 2320 Stagecraft/ Lighting Technology
This course will present the fundamentals of lighting technology and Stagecraft, and the equipment and methods used in both areas as it applies to theatre making. Students taking this class will practice skill sets needed in theatrical construction; including the use of power tools. Three credit hours.

THEA 2352 Script Analysis
An exploration of in-depth analysis of a play’s storyline, characters, dialogue, images, metaphors and themes. Students will read, view and analyze play scripts, learning how essential information is conveyed, how story elements are communicated through visual means, how a dramatic arc is built with cause and effect, and what makes a character credible and complex. Three credit hours.

THEA 2359 IT for Theatre and Dance
An exploration of current forms of information technology such as video editing, graphic design, presentation platforms, web design, blogging, etc. as tools for creative design in choreography and directing, and as marketing tools for career promotion. Three credit hours.

THEA 2360 Acting I
A beginning level performance course. Class exercises and projects are structured to emphasize the basic theories of acting at the core of the contemporary American theatre. Three credit hours.

THEA 3160, 3161, 4161, 4162 Stage Production
Designed to provide a laboratory experience with supervised practice in order to introduce the various positions and skills associated with theatrical production. Special emphasis is placed on the communicative processes used in collaborative production. One Credit Hour.

THEA 3350 Voice and Movement
Prerequisite: THEA 2360 or consent of instructor. Focuses on building a process for correct, healthy voice usage in theatre performance in combination with movement training. Three credit hours.

THEA 3351 Acting II
Prerequisites: THEA 2352 & THEA 2360. A performance course designed to teach what acting is and to provide a structured opportunity for the individual to become familiar in an intellectual and a hands-on manner with the craft and skills required to create and perform a character in a text oriented theatrical production. Three credit hours.

THEA 3360 Stage Management
A systematic exploration of the stage manager’s role in theatrical production ranging from communicative collaboration to the management of time, materials, and personnel in relation to pre-production, rehearsal, and “calling” a show. Three credit hours.

THEA 3362 Directing I
Prerequisites: THEA 2352 & THEA 2360. This course explores the study of interpretive styles of play direction, rehearsal techniques, audience analysis, contemporary trends and the way a director thinks. Opportunity to test principles in assigned laboratory production. Three credit hours.

THEA 3380 Lighting Design
An exploratory class in the fundamentals of lighting design introducing students to design concepts for theatre and dance through the development of creative thinking and the specific language of the medium. Three credit hours.

THEA 3381 Scenic Design
This course explores the creative making and artistry of scenic design. The student will develop the ability to perform an extrinsic interpretation of a play and then by use of skill-based experimentation create a design that supports his/her specific concept for the environment the actors will live in on stage. Three credit hours.

THEA 3382 Costume Design
The students will combine acquired knowledge of design theory and practice, acquired skills of text analysis, and acquired skills of oral and written presentation to define, develop and demonstrate a creative process that utilizes costume as visual story-telling. Three credit hours.

THEA 4140, 4240, 4340 Special Topics in Theatre Arts
Special topics for the study of plays, playwrights, theatrical periods, styles, production methods, and other topics related to the general curriculum. The content and course subtitle change each time offered. Refer to the semester class schedule for a descriptive title of the content. Dual listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog at the 5000-level. One, two, or three credit hours.

THEA 4160, 4260, 4360 Independent Study
Prerequisite: Consent of Theatre faculty. Open only to qualified students who seek to do advanced research on a topic selected in consultation with an instructor. One, two, or three credit hours.

THEA 4350 History of Theatre I
Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing. A chronological survey of theatre history from its origins through the Baroque period. Particular emphasis paid to major periods of theatrical achievement, studying conjectural and documented styles in acting, design and production methods. This course will look at the influences of painting, sculpture, architecture and music on theatre and dance during each of the following artistic periods: Greek and Roman, Medieval, Renaissance, and Baroque. Three credit hours.

THEA 4351 History of Theatre II
Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing. A survey of Theatre practice from Romanticism through Postmodernism. Special attention given to innovative aspects, such as surrealism and expressionism, epic theatre, the absurd movement, multi-media presentations, and environmental theatre. Influences from painting, sculpture, architecture and music will also be examined. Three credit hours.

THEA 4352 Dramatic Criticism
An introduction to critical and aesthetic theory as applied to dramatic literature and theatrical production. Emphasis on the exploration of evolving theories in the last century including semiotics, phenomenology, post-structuralism, post colonial and post modern theory, feminist, gender and performance studies. Three credit hours.

THEA 4361 Directing II
Prerequisites: THEA 2352, THEA 2360, & THEA 3362. An advanced course dealing with the theory of directing and the development of skills introduced in the Directing 1 course. Students will be given opportunity to test principles in an assigned laboratory production.Three credit hours.

THEA 4362 Capstone
Prerequisites: Senior major in good standing; Faculty approval of the project proposal. This course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to integrate core and major concentration courses into an in-depth project that focuses on academic and/or creative skills. The result of the work will support a pursuit of continued education and or a professional career. The project may take the form of a creative project (performance, design, production) or a research project based on a hypothesis that can be explored by a literary survey and/or laboratory application. Three credit hours.

THEA 4364 Contemporary Theatre
This course will examine contemporary plays and musicals by employing the examination of the script, choice of costumes, scene design, choreography, music and special effects, acting and directing. Students will critique at least one contemporary theatre production from the UALR season, associated regional and local theatres. Students will work in teams to create their own contemporary theatre events. Three credit hours.

THEA 4369 Performance Internship
Prerequisites: Theatre major and consent of faculty. This course is designed to provide an internship with a professional theatre company focused on an aspect of performance (acting, directing, choreography, stage management, dramaturgy).The student will spend the majority of time on site working with and according to the company’s schedule in fulfillment of production assignments determined by the management in consultation with the department coordinator. Three credit hours.

THEA 4370 Design/Technical Internship
Prerequisites: Theatre major and consent of faculty. This course is designed to provide an internship with a professional theatre company focused on an aspect of design and technical theatre (scenic design, lighting design, costume design, properties, sound design, & technical direction). The student will spend the majority of time on site working with and according to the company’s schedule in fulfillment of production assignments determined by the management in consultation with the department coordinator. Three credit hours.