School of Public Affairs

Stabler Hall, room 610, (501) 569-3331, (501) 569-8271 (fax), Website

Interim Director:
Giammo, Joseph D., Associate Professor


Professors:
Bacot, Hunter
Rice, Daryl H.
Scranton, Margaret E.
Stevenson, Jerry


Associate Professor:
Craw, Mike
Glazier, Rebecca

Assistant Professor:
Leach, Kirk
Wiebelhaus-Brahm, Eric

The School of Public Affairs offers courses for students interested in understanding government and politics, public administration, community development, and non-profit organizations, all at the international, national, state, and local levels.

Courses in the School strive to instill in students a number of important skills, including critical thinking, analysis, writing, and the practical application of ideas to real world situations. The combination of substantive knowledge and practical skills instilled by courses in the School provides a solid background to help our students to excel as leaders in a variety of fields, including politics, government service, law, teaching, the non-profit sector, and business.

General Information

Knowledge Goals

Students majoring in political science will be exposed to a wide range of substantive information about the world of politics, covering subjects such as:

  • The history, characteristics, and impact of political institutions and systems, including international, national, state, and local governments
  • The behavior of individual actors at both the mass and elite levels
  • The processes involved in creating government policy and the impact of those policies
  • The debates over the normative foundations of the state, the scope of its activities, and the nature of justice
Skill Goals

Students majoring in political science will develop practical and marketable skills which will help them to apply that knowledge to any number of career paths. These skills include:

  • Critical thinking – the ability to read and evaluate primary texts, ideas, theories, and political analysis
  • Analysis/Research – the ability to pose and answer questions effectively
  • Argumentation/Persuasion – the ability to use logic and evidence to build a persuasive argument
  • Written and Verbal Communication – the ability to communicate ideas clearly on paper or through oral presentations
  • Working in Groups – the ability to effectively coordinate with others on a project
  • Practical Applications – the ability to take information gained through coursework and use it effectively in real world or simulated exercises

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Degrees Available

The School offers the following majors and minors:

  • BA in Political Science
  • BA in International Studies (Interdisciplinary Program)
  • BA in Community Management and Development
  • BA in Legal Studies (Supplementary Major)
  • Minor in Political Science
  • Minor in International Studies (Interdisciplinary Program)
  • Minor in Middle Eastern Studies
  • Minor in Presidential Studies

Secondary Teacher Licensure

See “Minor in Education” for details and contact the School of Public Affairs as soon as possible for program advising.


Minor in Political Science

A minor in political science requires 18 credit hours, including POLS 1310 American National Government, POLS 2303 Introduction to International Politics, and at least 9 hours of upper-level courses.
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Bachelor of Arts in Political Science

General: 120 minimum total hours, including 45 hours of upper-level courses (3000-4000 level), and 30 hours in residence

First-Year Colloquium (0-3 hours)

Required of full-time freshmen entering college for the first time and transfer students with less than 12 hours of credit

Core (35 hours)

See General Education Requirements for more details.

Second Language Proficiency (0-9 hours)

Completion of 2000-level second language course or demonstrate equivalent proficiency. See General Education Requirements for more details.

Major (33 hours)
Political Science Foundation Courses (6 hours)

POLS 1310 American National Government (Also counts toward the core)
POLS 2303 Introduction to International Politics (Also counts toward the core)

American Politics (6 hours)

POLS 3300 American Political Parties
POLS 3303 American State and Local Government
POLS 3305 Elections and Public Opinion
POLS 3320 The American Presidency
POLS 3350 Arkansas Government and Politics
POLS 4350 Constitutional Law: Governmental Powers
POLS 4351 Constitutional Law: Civil Liberties

International Politics (6 hours)

POLS 3360 Comparative Governments: Western
POLS 3365 European Union
POLS 3370 Comparative Politics: Developing Areas
POLS 4320 American Foreign Policy
POLS 4331 International Organizations
POLS 4340 International Relations

Normative and Empirical Analysis (3 hours)

POLS 3302 Methods of Political Inquiry
POLS 3304 Qualitative Methods in Political Science
POLS 3390 American Political Thought
POLS 4380 Classical Political Theory
POLS 4390 Modern Political Theory
POLS 4395 Research-Intensive Seminar

Field Experience

Students must complete one of the following. Coursework taken to satisfy this requirement may also be used to satisfy a subfield or elective requirement for the major.

POLS 3338 Cooperative Education in Political Science I
POLS 3339 Cooperative Education in Political Science II
POLS 3348 Internship I
POLS 4348 Internship II

Any POLS course with a service learning component Any travel course or study abroad program
A paid or volunteer position of at least 15 weeks with a government agency, elected official, campaign, interest group, or other politically-oriented organization. (Students taking this option will not receive course credit, but will have the requirement waived.) In order to use this option to satisfy the requirement, students must provide evidence of the position and submit a paper describing the work that they did to the internship coordinator for approval.

Electives (12 hours)

Four upper-level political science (POLS) courses.

Minor (none required)
Unrestricted General Electives

Remaining hours, if any, to reach 120 minimum total hours, 45 hours of upper-level courses (3000-4000 level), and/or 30 hours in residence.
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Bachelor of Arts in Political Science with Secondary Education Licensure

General: 120 minimum total hours, including 45 hours of upper-level courses (3000-4000 level), and 30 hours in residence

First-Year Colloquium (0-3 hours)

Required of full-time freshmen entering college for the first time and transfer students with less than 12 hours of credit (See page 25 for requirement details.)

Core (35 hours)

See page (See page 25 for requirement details.

Second Language Proficiency (0-9 hours)

Completion of 2000-level second language course or demonstrate equivalent proficiency. See page (See page 26 for details.

Major (33 hours)
Political Science Foundation Courses (6 hours)

POLS 1310 American National Government (Also counts toward the core)
POLS 2303 Introduction to International Politics (Also counts toward the core)

American Politics (6 hours)

POLS 3300 American Political Parties
POLS 3303 American State and Local Government
POLS 3305 Elections and Public Opinion
POLS 3320 The American Presidency
POLS 3350 Arkansas Government and Politics
POLS 4350 Constitutional Law: Governmental Powers
POLS 4351 Constitutional Law: Civil Liberties

International Politics (6 hours)

POLS 3360 Comparative Governments: Western
POLS 3365 European Union
POLS 3370 Comparative Politics: Developing Areas
POLS 4320 American Foreign Policy
POLS 4331 International Organizations
POLS 4340 International Relations

Normative and Empirical Analysis (3 hours)

POLS 3302 Methods of Political Inquiry
POLS 3304 Qualitative Methods in Political Science
POLS 3390 American Political Thought
POLS 4380 Classical Political Theory
POLS 4390 Modern Political Theory
POLS 4395 Research-Intensive Seminar

Field Experience

Students must complete one of the following. Coursework taken to satisfy this requirement may also be used to satisfy a subfield or elective requirement for the major.

POLS 3338 Cooperative Education in Political Science I
POLS 3339 Cooperative Education in Political Science II
POLS 3348 Internship I
POLS 4348 Internship II
Any POLS course with a service learning component.
Any travel course or study abroad program
A paid or volunteer position of at least 15 weeks with a government agency, elected official, campaign, interest group, or other politically-oriented organization. (Students taking this option will not receive course credit, but will have the requirement waived.) In order to use this option to satisfy the requirement, students must provide evidence of the position and submit a paper describing the work that they did to the internship coordinator for approval.

Electives (12 hours)

Four upper-level political science (POLS) courses.

Minor (12-29 hours-Typical minor requires 18 hours)

Students who want to complete the Political Science major with secondary teacher licensure must complete both the Secondary Education and Social Studies minors. (See “Secondary Teacher Licensure” for details.)

Unrestricted General Electives

Remaining hours, if any, to reach 120 minimum total hours, 45 hours of upper-level courses (3000-4000 level), and/or 30 hours in residence.
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International Studies

The international studies program embraces an interdisciplinary curriculum which emphasizes global awareness in preparation for careers in international service. It enhances the development of advanced foreign language and communication skills and offers crucial insights into the scope of international and global problems.

The international studies curriculum is designed for students interested in seeking employment with a U.S. agency or company involved in international affairs, or attracted to work experience overseas. Military and diplomatic service, commercial enterprises, educational agencies, and development and human rights organizations offer opportunities for persons well‐versed in global concerns. In addition, the international studies major provides a solid foundation for potential graduate study in the social sciences, the humanities, journalism, and international business and law.

Because of the rigorous nature and the complexity of this curriculum, students are encouraged to contact the international studies coordinator during their freshman year to become familiar with the program and to discuss a feasible course of study.

Admission Requirements

Prerequisites for formal admission to the international studies program include having a cumulative grade point average of 2.50 and completion of the following courses:

RHET 1311 Composition I
RHET 1312 Composition II
HIST 1311 History of Civilization I
HIST 1312 History of Civilization II
GEOG 2310 World Regions
or GEOG 2312 Cultural Geography
FREN or SPAN 1311, 1312 (or equivalent)
ECON 2301 Survey of Economics
Additional prerequisites for students seeking an international studies degree with a business emphasis include:

MKTG 2380 Legal Environment of BusinessTop


Major in International Studies

The international studies program comprises a major/minor consisting of 45-48 hours. The curriculum is divided into a set of International Studies foundation courses and an area of concentration.

Area of Concentration

ana at ali's mosque_optIn addition to the International Studies foundation courses the student will select an area of concentration. Options include Latin America, Europe, a private track emphasis, or an area designed by the student with the advisor’s approval. Possible choices include, but are not limited to; East Asian Studies, International Women’s Issues, Middle Eastern studies, or a diplomatic, environmental, or a developing nations emphasis. The area concentration consists of 18 hours of thematically clustered courses from various academic disciplines, an advanced foreign language course in culture or literature, an internship or cooperative education work experience, and a senior paper connected with the student’s specialization.

Minor in International Studies

The minor in international studies is designed for students who have an interest in foreign cultures and global affairs and would like to complement their major or career related field with foreign language and international skills.

The international studies minor consists of 21 hours. Students must complete an intermediate foreign language course (2311 or above), INTS 2301 and 2302, and 4 hours of related upper-level courses chosen in consultation with the international studies coordinator.
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Bachelor of Arts in International Studies Private Sector

General: 120 minimum total hours, including 45 hours of upper-level courses (3000-4000 level), and 30 hours in residence

First-Year Colloquium (0-3 hours)

Required of full-time freshmen entering college for the first time and transfer students with less than 12 hours of credit (See page 25 for requirement details.)

Core (35 hours)

See page (See page 25 for requirement details.

Second Language Proficiency (0-9 hours)

Completion of 2000-level second language course or demonstrate equivalent proficiency. See page (See page 26 for details.

Major (54 hours)
Program Prerequisites (9 hours)

ECON 2310 Survey of Economics (Also counts towards core)
MKTG 2380 Legal Environment of Business

3 hours from Geography Courses:

GEOG 2312 Cultural Geography (Also counts towards core)
GEOG 2310 World Regions

International Studies Foundation Courses (21 hours)

INTS 2301 World Cultures
INTS 2302 Global Issues
INTS 4101 Senior Research Project: Proposal
INTS 4102 Senior Research Project: Paper
INTS 4103 Senior Research Project: Presentation
INTS 4350 Internship
MKTG 3350 Principals of Marketing
RHET 3300 Introduction to Research Methods
ACOM 4312 Intercultural Communication

Second Language (6 hours)

Two upper level courses in a foreign language (3000-4000 level)

Statistics (3 hours)

STAT 2350 Introduction to Statistics
ECON 2310 Business Statistics

Electives (12 hours)

Three courses (9 hours) upper level international business courses chosen in consultation with the International Studies adviser

Two courses (6 hours) upper level cultural/political courses chosen in consultation with the International Studies adviser

Minor (none required)
Unrestricted General Electives

Remaining hours, if any, to reach 120 minimum total hours, 45 hours of upper-level courses (3000-4000 level), and/or 30 hours in residence.
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Bachelor of Arts in International Studies Public Sector

General: 120 minimum total hours, including 45 hours of upper-level courses (3000-4000 level), and 30 hours in residence

First-Year Colloquium (0-3 hours)

Required of full-time freshmen entering college for the first time and transfer students with less than 12 hours of credit (See page 25 for requirement details.)

Core (35 hours)

See page (See page 25 for requirement details.

Second Language Proficiency (0-9 hours)

Completion of 2000-level second language course or demonstrate equivalent proficiency. See page (See page 26 for details.

Major (54 hours)
Program Prerequisites (9 hours)

ECON 2310 Survey of Economics (Also counts towards core)

3 hours from Geography Courses:

GEOG 2312 Cultural Geography (Also counts towards core)
GEOG 2310 World Regions

International Studies Foundation Courses (21 hours)

INTS 2301 World Cultures
INTS 2302 Global Issues
INTS 4101 Senior Research Project: Proposal
INTS 4102 Senior Research Project: Paper
INTS 4103 Senior Research Project: Presentation
INTS 4350 Internship
MKTG 3350 Principals of Marketing
RHET 3300 Introduction to Research Methods
ACOM 4312 Intercultural Communication

Second Language (6 hours)

Two upper level courses in a foreign language (3000-4000 level)

Statistics (3 hours)

STAT 2350 Introduction to Statistics
ECON 2310 Business Statistics

Electives (21 hours)

One course (3 hours) upper-level Political Science course (3000-4000 level) in comparative or international politics

Four courses (12 hours) of upper-level clustered courses chosen in consultation with the International Studies adviser

Two courses (6 hours) of upper-level designated courses chosen in consultation with the International Studies adviser
<h5Minor (none required)

Unrestricted General Electives

Remaining hours, if any, to reach 120 minimum total hours, 45 hours of upper-level courses (3000-4000 level), and/or 30 hours in residence.
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Minor in Presidential Studies

Joseph Giammo, Coordinator

The Presidential Studies minor enables students to gain a greater understanding of the presidency as an institution and as an actor within several arenas: government and politics, the economy, media and communications, and culture and society. As an interdisciplinary minor, Presidential Studies allows students to study multiple approaches for understanding the presidency and different aspects of presidential behavior, the executive branch, and public policy. Course work in the program is designed to enhance students’ understanding of how the presidency and executive branch operate and the institution’s impact on society at home and abroad.

The minor is well suited to combine with a major in Political Science, History, Mass Communications, Rhetoric and Writing, Speech Communication, and Professional and Technical Writing. This minor may be chosen as one of the concentrations in the Bachelor of Arts in Interdisciplinary Studies curriculum. The minor requires 21 hours. Students who declare the minor must be advised by the coordinator.

Students’ individual needs and interests are important considerations in the course selection and advising process. During registration, students should confirm with the coordinator that the courses they plan to take meet the requirements for the minor. Students who plan to take online courses or courses at other campuses must first seek written approval from the coordinator and apply for concurrent enrollment.

Minor in Presidential Studies
Required Courses (6 hours)


POLS 3320 The American Presidency
POLS 4360 Selected Topics in Political Science: Presidential Studies

History Requirements (6 hours)

HIST 3352 American Revolution, 1763-1787
HIST 3353 The New Republic: The US, 1787-1848
HIST 3355 American Civil War and Reconstruction, 1848-1876
HIST 3356 The Gilded Age: The US, 1876-1900
HIST 3357 The Age of Reform: The US, 1900-1939
HIST 3358 Recent America: The US, 1939-present
HIST 4385 U.S. Diplomatic History
HIST 4387 Great Decisions in American Foreign Policy (if not taken below as POLS 4387)

Political Science Requirements (6 hours)

POLS 3301 Seminar in Political Science
POLS 3331 Public Administration (if not taken below as PADM 3331)
POLS 4345 The Clinton Presidency
POLS 4350 Constitutional Law: Governmental Powers
POLS 4387 Great Decisions in American Foreign Policy (if not taken above as HIST 4387)
<h6One course from the following (3 hours)

RHET 4306 Writing for Business and Government
PADM 3331 Public Administration (if not taken above as POLS 3331)
HIST 4391 Seminar in United States History
HIST 4395 History Internship
POLS 3348 Internship I
POLS 4348 Internship II
PSYC 4290, 4390 Senior Seminar
ACOM 4313 Seminar: Topics in Communication
MCOM 4384 Topics in Journalism
MCOM 4370 Special Topics: RTVF
RHET 4347 Topics in Nonfiction Writing
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Middle Eastern Studies

Eric Wiebelhaus-Brahm, Coordinator
Faculty: Rebecca Glazier, Department of Political Science
Simon Hawkins, Department of Sociology and Anthropology
Krista Lewis, Department of Sociology and Anthropology
Eric Wiebelhaus-Brahm, Department of Political Science
Navin Shafeek Amin, Department of Sociology and Anthropology

Website
The Middle Eastern Studies minor is an interdisciplinary program that gives student the opportunity to study the Middle East in-depth by combining existing course offerings from a number of disciplines. The minor is available to students from a wide variety of majors, and is particularly valuable option for students majoring in International Studies, Political Science, Anthropology, or History. The minor consists of 18 credit hours, including three required upper-division courses in politics, cultures and history of the Middle East, and three elective courses with a focus on the Middle East. The list of available elective courses is expanding.

The minor is a part of a broader Middle Eastern Studies Program, funded by the King Fahd endowment. The program offers, on competitive basis, grants for Middle Eastern Studies students studying at UALR and for UALR faculty with interest in the Middle East. The program also supports a series of monthly lectures and events on the Middle East. For further information, please contact the program chair.

Minor description:
The minor requires 18 upper level hours to include:

POLS 4375/5375 Politics of the Middle East
ANTH 3319 Cultures of the Middle East
HIST 3336 Islam and the Modern Middle East OR
HIST 4390 “Islamic Civilization 600-1900”

and 9 hours of elective credit selected from courses with a Middle Eastern focus including the following courses:

POLS 3301 Global Terrorism
RELS 3370 Judaism
RELS 3336 Islam
ANTH 4325 Egyptology
GEOG 4300 Geography of the Middle East
POLS 3101 Model Arab League
Students can transfer their credits for other minor-related coursework, including study of Middle Eastern Languages. Other elective courses may be substituted with prior consent of the program coordinator.


Bachelor of Arts in Community Management and Development

General: 120 minimum total hours, including 45 hours of upper-level courses (3000-4000 level), and 30 hours in residence

First-Year Colloquium (0-3 hours)

Required of full-time freshmen entering college for the first time and transfer students with less than 12 hours of credit

UALR Standard and CSSC College Core (35 hours)

COMD majors are required to complete ACOM 1300 (Speech Communiation) as part of their Humanities/Social Sciences/ Communications-Speech/Interdisciplinary core requirement.

Major (39 hours)
Foundational Competencies (24 hours)
Communication competency (6 credit hours)

Written communication: 3 credit hours from the following (in consultation with academic advisor):
MCOM 2380 (Strategic Communication Principles)
RHET 3316 (Writing for the Workplace)
RHET 3326 (Technical Writing)

Speech communication: 3 credit hours from the following (in consultation with academic advisor):

ACOM 3300 (Interpersonal Communication)
ACOM 3320 (Advanced Public Speaking)
ACOM 3322 (Small Group Communication)
ACOM 3323 (Conflict Management)
ACOM 3330 (Professional Communication)
ACOM 4312 (lntercultural Communication)
ACOM 4311 (Organizational Communication I)
ACOM 4357 (Communicating with Difference)

Management competency (6 credit hours from the following in consultation with academic advisor):

ACCT 2310 (Accounting I)
ACCT 2330 (Accounting II)
CRJU 3306 (Police Administration and Management)
HHPS 4378 (Organization and Administration of Health Education Programs)
MGMT 3300 (Principles of Management)
MGMT 3320 (Human Resources Management)
MGMT 3340 (Applied Organizational Behavior)
PADM 3331 (Public Administration)
PADM 4313 (Public Personnel Administration)
NPLS 3300 (Management of Nonprofit Agencies)
PSYC 3370 (Industrial Psychology)

Analytic competency (6 credit hours from the following in consultation with academic advisor):

ANTH 3381 (Social Statistics)
BINS 3305 (Management Information Systems)
BINS 3352 (Data AnalysisNisualization)
CRJU 3314 (Statistics in Criminal Justice)
CRJU 4304 (Research Methods)
ECON 2310 (Business Statistics)
ECON 2312 (Quantitative Methods)
ERSC 4421 (Introduction to Geographic Information Systems)
ERSC 4422 (Applied GIS)
GEOG 3333 (Geospatial Technologies)
IFSC 1202 (Introduction to Object-Oriented Technology)
IFSC 1310 (Internet Technologies)
ITEC 3610 (Introduction to Information Technology and Applications)
MCOM 3315 (Mass Media Research)
POLS 3302 (Methods of Political Inquiry)
POLS 3304 (Qualitative Methods in Political Science)
PSYC 2340 (Statistics and Methods I)
PSYC 3341 (Research Methods I)
PSYC 3342 (Statistics and Methods II)
PSYC 3346 (Honors Research Methods I)
SOCI 3381 (Social Statistics)
SOCI 3385 (Research Methods)
SOWK 3322 (Methods of Social Work Research)
SOWK 3381 (Statistics for Social Workers)
ACOM 2311 (Introduction to Communication Research)
STAT 2350 (Introduction to Statistical Methods)
STAT 3351 (Statistical Inference)
STAT 3352 (Applied Statistics I)

Urban social science competency (6 credit hours):

POLS 4355 (Urban Planning and Land Use)

3 credit hours from the following (in consultation with academic advisor):

ANTH 4310 (Urban Anthropology)
ANTH/HIST 4324 (The City)
CRJU 2301 (Police and Community Crime Prevention)
EDFN 2300 (American Education)
GEOG 3320 (Urban Geography)
HIST 4359 (American Urban History)
POLS 4308 (Topics in Urban Studies)
POLS 4356 (Urban Policy and Government)
PSYC 3308 (Urban Environmental Psychology)
SOCI 3341 (URBAN SOCIOLOGY)

Experiential learning (6 credit hours)

Students must complete coursework in foundational competencies before beginning the experiential learning requirement.
CRJU/GEOG/HIST 3390 (Neighborhood Studies)

3 credit hours in approved internship or from the following courses, in consultation with academic advisor:

ANTH 4312 (Eating Cultures)
ANTH 4440 (Applied Anthropology)
ACOM 3320 (Advanced Public Speaking)
ACOM 4350 (Effective Crisis Communication)

Directed electives (9 credit hours)

In additional 3000 level and above courses selected in consultation with academic advisor.

Unrestricted general electives

Remaining hours, if any, to reach 120 minimum total hours, 45 hours in upper-level courses (3000-4000 level), and/or 30 hours in residence.

Bachelor of Arts in Legal Studies

The Bachelor of Arts in Legal Studies is known as a supplemental major. A supplemental major (also known at other institutions as “dependent” or “secondary”) is a type of second major that requires students to have a primary major as well. The primary major determines any university-level requirements. The supplemental major is a particularly good device when designing interdisciplinary programs, such as the study of law. Law plays a role in all areas of experience, from business to poetry. Thus it is appropriate for an undergraduate legal studies degree to be attached or “supplemental” to some other area of expertise. Students will be able to declare the supplemental major in Legal Studies with any primary major.

The major will provide undergraduate students with an opportunity to become familiar with legal ideas, legal institutions, and the legal process. The major is designed to stimulate critical thinking and understanding about the theoretical frameworks, historical dynamics, and cultural embeddedness of law.

General: 120 minimum total hours

Core (35 hours)

See “General Education Requirements.”

Primary Major (30-36 hours)
Second Language Proficiency (determined by primary major)

Completion of 2000-level second language course or demonstrate equivalent proficiency. (See “Second Language Requirements”)

Supplemental Major (33 hours)

Legal Studies Supplemental Major Requirements

Foundations (9 hours): take all four

ACOM 1300 Speech Communication (also counts toward Core)
POLS 1310 American National Government (also counts toward Core)
PHIL 1330 or 2350 Critical Thinking OR Introduction to Logic
LGST 3300 Introduction to Legal Studies (pre-requisites: Comp II, POLS 1310, and PHIL 1330 or 2350)

Advanced Communication (6 hours): take one speech, one writing

RHET 3315 Persuasive Writing
RHET 3316 Writing for Work
RHET 3326 Technical Writing
RHET 4306 Writing for Business and Government
RHET 4315 Advanced Persuasive Writing
RHET 4325 Legal Writing and Analysis
ACOM 3316 Interviewing
ACOM 3320 Advanced Public Speaking
ACOM 3323 Conflict Management
ACOM 3330 Professional Communication
ACOM 3340 Communication Ethics for the Professional
ACOM 4350 Effective Crisis Communication

Legal Institutions and Processes (3 hours)

POLS 3325 Legislative Process and Behavior
POLS 4301 Judicial System and Process
CRJU 4301 Judicial System and Process

Substantive Law (6 hours)

CRJU 3301 Criminal Evidence
CRJU 3307 Criminal Law
CRJU 4305 Juvenile Law and Process
CRJU 4351 Constitutional Law – Civil Liberties
ENHS 3310 Environmental Regulations
HHPS 4325 Legal and Ethical Issues in Sport
MCOM 4352 News Media and the First Amendment
MGMT 4341 Labor and Industrial Relations
MGMT 4391 Employment Law
MKTG 2380 Legal Environment of Business
MKTG 3381 Advanced Business Law
MKTG 4378 Real Estate Law
POLS 4341 Topics: International Law
POLS 4350 Constitutional Law – Governmental Powers
POLS 4351 Constitutional Law – Civil Liberties

Perspectives on the Law (6 hours)

ANTH 4313 Race and Human Variation
ANTH 4355/4155 Forensic Anthropology/Lab
CRJU 3310 Race/Ethnicity and Criminal Justice
CRJU 3312 Victimology
CRJU 3313 Crime and Science: An Introduction to Forensic Science
CRJU 3337 Juvenile Delinquency
CRJU 3338 Criminological Theory
CRJU 3396 Psychology and the Criminal Process
CRJU/POLS 4302 Law and Society
GNST/SOCI 3346 Family Sociology
GNST/SOCI 3350 Family Violence
HIST/RACE 4355 History of Race and Ethnicity in America
HIST 4358 Civil Rights Since 1954
HIST 4363 Law in American History
MCOM 3360 Mass Communication Law, Policy and Ethics
PHIL 3341 Contemporary Ethical Theory
PHIL 3346 Social and Political Philosophy
PHIL 3347 Philosophy of Law
PHIL 4373 Philosophy of Race
POLS 3390 American Political Thought
POLS 4360 Topics: International Human Rights
PSYC 3350 Social Psychology
PSYC 3356 Developmental Psychology
PSYC 3358 Adolescent Psychology
PSYC 3360 Abnormal Psychology
PSYC 4301 Drug Abuse
SOCI 3334 Social Problems
SOCI 3335 Sociology of Deviant Behavior
SOCI 3337 Juvenile Delinquency

Minor in Legal Studies

Joanne Matson, Coordinator
SUB 108 | (501) 569-8386 | jlmatson@ualr.edu
The legal studies minor provides the opportunity to develop a greater understanding of law and legal institutions. The program is broadly humanistic, giving students a general knowledge of the institutional, philosophical, and historical character of the legal system. Course work in the program is designed to help students understand and use written and spoken language, to foster a critical understanding of the human institutions and values with which the law deals, and to stimulate creative thinking.

A minor in legal studies is not designed specifically to prepare a student for law school. There is no recommended major or minor for law school. If you are interested in attending law school, the best preparation is an undergraduate curriculum that requires you to investigate information, analyze it, and explain your conclusions clearly. Most often a broad liberal arts background is the best preparation for these tasks. See “Prelaw Studies” for further information about preparation for law school.

The minor requires 18 hours, which must be approved by the coordinator. No more than nine hours may be chosen from any one discipline. The student’s individual needs and interests are important considerations in the course selection process. This minor may also be chosen as one of the concentrations in the Bachelor of Arts in Interdisciplinary Studies curriculum. Before beginning the program, students should get a list of approved courses for the minor by contacting the coordinator.

For more information contact the coordinator, Joanne Liebman Matson, in the Department of Rhetoric and Writing, SUB 108, (501) 569-8386, or jlmatson@ualr.edu.

Courses in the School of Public Affairs