Department of Construction Management and Civil and Construction Engineering

General Information | Degree Requirements | Courses in Construction and Civil Construction Engineering

ETAS, Room 203, (501) 569-8133, (501) 569-8341 (fax), View/Download PDF Version

Chairperson:
Tramel, Michael

Coordinator of Undergraduate Construction Management Programs:
Ray, Chris

Coordinator of Graduate Construction Management Programs:
Pellicane, Patrick

Coordinator of Architectural, Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering Programs:
Jovanovic, Nickolas

Professors:
Blacklock, James
Carr, James K.
Pellicane, Patrick
Tramel, Michael

Associate Professors:
Akhnoukh, Amin
Bray, Hollis
Jovanovic, Nickolas
Ray, Chris

Assistant Professors:
Thomas, Lashun

Senior Instructor:
Woodard, John

Advanced Instructor:
Squires, Mark

Adjunct Instructors:
Barsoum, Magued
Gram, Robert
Gursoy, Gozde
Hart, Robert
Kelley, Michael
Mantione, Donna
McKenney, Christopher
Phillips, Doyle
Wright, Teresa

Laboratory Specialist:and Lecturer
Blackmon, Larry

Administrative Assistant:
Bates Slaughter, Sandra

Construction is our nation’s largest industry. It encompasses the residential sector, commercial and retail buildings, office and high-rise structures, major industrial and process complexes, and engineering infrastructure such as highways, dams, bridges, airports, and seaports. The complexity of projects demands that professional constructors and engineers possess detailed knowledge of the many aspects of the industry to effectively lead and manage the design and construction processes.

UALR’s construction-related programs provide curricula that equip for a wide range of design, managerial, and supervisory roles within this multi-faceted, dynamic industry. Technological, computer, and software orientation assist our graduates to develop into contributing members of the architectural, engineering, and construction industry with high paying entry level jobs. There are substantial opportunities for rapid advancement and salary increases with experience in the industry. Career opportunities for our graduates can be found with general and specialty contractors, architectural and engineering design firms, testing laboratories, government agencies, financial institutions, insurance and surety companies, and manufacturers of construction equipment and products. The courses provide an in-depth study of construction management, construction science, engineering, business, mathematics, and sciences. Extensive applications with construction and engineering computer software and hardware emphasize the most current technologies used by industry.
Construction Management Heavy Team

General Information

Degrees Offered

Minor in Construction Management

The minor in construction management is available to all UALR students who want to learn about construction materials, methods, and management. Students are required to take eighteen credit hours of approved CNMG courses.

Admission Policy

After admission to UALR, any student may declare a major or minor in construction management. Admission to one of the department’s engineering majors requires readiness to take MATH 1451 Calculus I and CHEM 1406 General Chemistry for Engineers. Students may be provisionally admitted into one of the engineering majors before this, but they may require more than four years to complete the degree requirements.

Contact Information

To discuss the construction management programs, students should visit Mike Tramel in ETAS 203, call (501) 569-8133, or send e-mail to jmtramel@ualr.edu.
To discuss any of the engineering programs, students should visit Nick Jovanovic in ETAS 202F, call (501) 569-8226, or send e-mail to nsjovanovic@ualr.edu.

For additional information, please visit the department website. Facsimiles may be sent to (501) 569-8341.

Work Experience Requirement

All students in the department are required to complete a minimum of 800 contact hours of practical work experience in an approved construction- or engineering-related activity. This stipulation provides the graduate with valuable industry experience and insights.

Accreditation

The four-year baccalaureate, construction management program is accredited by the American Council for Construction Education (ACCE). The ACCE is recognized by the Council for Higher Education Accreditation as the national accrediting agency for four-year baccalaureate programs in construction education. Accreditation is a means for recognizing educational institutions that achieve and maintain a level of performance, integrity, and quality that entitles them to the confidence of the educational community and the public they serve. The UALR construction management program is the only such accredited program in the University of Arkansas system.

A new engineering program cannot seek accreditation until at least one student has graduated from the program. As new programs, the engineering programs offered by the department are not currently accredited.

Student Activities

Concrete WorkThe UALR construction management program has five student chapters and one honor society for student involvement. The student chapters are affiliated with the Associated General Contractors (AGC), the Associated Builders and Contractors (ABC), the National Association of Home Builders (NAHB), Construction Specification Institute (CSI), and the Forest Product Society (FPS). The Arkansas chapter of each association sponsors the student chapters and provides opportunities for students to interact and network with members of their organizations. Special student membership is also available with the American Concrete Institute (ACI), American Society of Professional Estimators (ASPE), National Association of Women in Construction (NAWIC), and the International Code Council (ICC).

Students who meet the requirements can become members of Sigma Lambda Chi, the International Honor Society for Leaders in Construction. The UALR construction management program is a member of the Associated Schools of Construction (ASC) and participates in the ASC regional construction management competitions. Selected students can also compete in the sponsoring student chapter construction management competitions for ABC, AGC, and FPS.

Engineering students have the opportunity to become involved with several engineering organizations, including the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE), the Society of Women Engineers (SWE), and Engineers Without Borders (EWB). Engineering students can participate in regional and national student competitions, such as the National Student Steel Bridge Competition, the Big Beam Contest, and the Charles Pankow Foundation Annual Architectural Engineering Student Design Competition.


Bachelor of Science in Construction Management

The construction management program is an interdisciplinary baccalaureate degree program that builds upon construction methods, engineering techniques, and business courses offered in the Donaghey College of Engineering and Information Technology and the College of Business. The integrated curriculum provides a foundation for the capstone courses offered in the senior year and the required passage of the Associate Constructor (AC) examination.

A minor is not required, but may be obtained from the College of Business. Students seeking a Bachelor of Science degree in Construction Management must pass each CNMG course with a grade of C or greater.

Bachelor of Science in Construction Management

General: 124 total hours, including 45 hours of upper-level courses (3000-4000 level), and 30 hours in residence

First-Year Colloquium (0-1 hour)

Required of full-time freshmen entering college for the first time and transfer students with less than 12 hours of credit. (See page 19 for details)

    CNMG 1101 First Year Colloquium in Construction

Core (30 hours)

Composition/Communication (9 Hours)

    RHET 1311 Composition I
    RHET 1312 Composition II
    SPCH 1300 Speech Communication

Fine Arts/Humanities (6 Hours)
Fine Arts (choose one):

    MUHL 2305 Introduction to Music
    ARHA 2305 Introduction to Visual Art
    THEA 2305 Introduction to Theatre and Dance
    AND

Humanities (choose one):

    ENGL 2337 World Literature
    ENGL 2338 World Literature Themes
    PHIL 2320 Ethics and Society

Social Sciences (9 Hours)
Choose one of the following:
    POLS 1310 American National Government
    HIST 2311 U.S. History to 1877
    HIST 2312 U.S. History since 1877
    AND
    ECON 2301 Survey of Economics
    AND

Choose one of the following:

    HIST 1311 History of Civilization I
    HIST 1312 History of Civilization II

Additional Communications, Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences (3 Hours)

    ECON 4324 Environmental Economics

Technical Writing (3 Hours)

    MGMT 3380 Business Communication
    or RHET 3316 Writing for Work
    or RHET 3326 Technical Writing

Major (94 hours)

Math and Science courses (15 hours):

    MATH 1401 Precalculus
    MATH 1342 Business Calculus
    or MATH 1311 Applied Calculus I
    or MATH 1451 Calculus I
    ERSC 1302 Physical Geology
    ERSC 1102 Physical Geology Lab
    PHYS 1321 Elementary Physics I
    PHYS 1121 Elementary Physics I Laboratory

Computing Course (3 hours)

    MGMT 1310 Fundamentals of Information Technology
    or CPSC 1370 Computer Literacy

Business and Management (9 hours)

    ACCT 2310 Principles of Accounting I
    MKTG 2380 Legal Environment of Business
    or MGMT 4391 Employment Law
    MGMT 4372 Construction Business Management
    Approved Business Elective(s) (as necessary to total at least 18 hours of business)

Construction Management Requirements (64 hours):

    CNMG 1301 The Construction Industry (transfer students may substitute a CNMG elective)
    CNMG 1305 Drawings and Specifications
    CNMG 2313 Construction Materials and Methods
    CNMG 2303 Construction Practicum
    CNMG 2314 Mechanical, Electrical, and Plumbing (MEP) Systems
    CNMG 2304 MEP Practicum
    CNMG 2316 Construction Surveying with Lab
    CNMG 2318 Building Information Modeling
    CNMG 3321 Steel Construction
    CMNG 3322 Concrete Construction
    CNMG 3327 Field Engineering and Construction Equipment
    CNMG 3333 Statics and Strength of Materials
    CNMG 3339 Estimating I
    CNMG 3347 Engineering Soil Mechanics with Lab
    CNMG 3195 Community Service Projects
    CNMG 4310 Construction Financial Management
    CNMG 4311 Estimating II
    CNMG 4323 Construction Administration
    CNMG 4329 Constructions Planning and Scheduling
    CNMG 4334 Construction Contracts and Law
    CNMG 4342 Construction Safety
    CNMG 4245 Construction Management Capstone
    CNMG 4145 Professional Constructors Certification


Construction Management Electives (3 hours)
Any CNMG course approved by the CNMG coordinator

Major Electives (3 hours):

    CNMG 4399 Special Topics
    or CNMG 4391 Cooperative Education
    or CNMG 4361 Green Construction
    or approved CNMG elective

Minor (none required)

Unrestricted General Electives

Remaining hours, if any, to reach 120 minimum total hours, 45 hours of upper-level courses (3000-4000 level), or 30 hours in residence.
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Bachelor of Science in Civil and Construction Engineering

The civil and construction engineering program focuses on structural engineering, geotechnical engineering, environmental and water resources engineering, and construction engineering. However, the program also exposes students to other major areas of civil engineering, including materials engineering, highway engineering, and surveying.

A minor is not required. Students seeking a Bachelor of Science degree in Civil and Construction Engineering must pass each CNMG course with a grade of C or greater, must achieve at least a 2.00 grade point average (GPA) in the major (all required MATH, STAT, CHEM, PHYS, CNMG and SYEN courses), and also must pass both the Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) and the Associate Constructor (AC) examinations.

Bachelor of Science in Civil and Construction Engineering

General: 127 total hours, including 45 hours of upper-level courses (3000-4000 level), and 30 hours in residence

First-Year Colloquium (0-3 hours)

Required of full-time freshmen entering college for the first time and transfer students with less than 12 hours of credit. (See page 36 for details)

    CNMG 1101 First-Year Colloquium in Construction
    or any other FYC

Core (35 hours)

English/Communication Requirement (6 hours)

    RHET 1311 Composition I
    RHET 1312 Composition II

Math (3 hours)

    MATH 3322 Differential Equations

Science (8 hours)

    CHEM 1406 Engineering Chemistry
    or CHEM 1402 General Chemistry I
    PHYS 2321 Physics for Scientists and Engineers I
    PHYS 2121 Physics for Scientists and Engineers I Lab

U.S. History and Government Requirement (3 hours)

    HIST 2311 U.S. History to 1877
    or HIST 2312 U.S. History since 1877
    or POLS 1310 American National Government

Fine Arts/Humanities/Social Sciences (9 hours)
Three of the following:

    ANTH 2316 Cultural Anthropology
    ARHA 2305 Introduction to Visual Art
    CRJU 2300 Introduction to Criminal Justice
    ECON 2301 Survey of Economics
    ENGL 2337 World Literature
    ENGL 2338 World Literature Themes
    ERSC 2300 Science and Technology in Society
    GEOG 2312 Cultural Geography
    GNST 2300 Introduction to Gender Studies
    HIST 1311 History of Civilization I
    HIST 1312 History of Civilization II
    MCOM 2330 Mass Media and Society
    MUHL 2305 Introduction to Music
    PHIL 2320 Ethics and Society
    POLS 2301 Introduction to Political Science
    PSYC 2300 Psychology and the Human Experience
    RELS 2305 World Religions
    SOCI 2300 Introductory to Sociology
    SPCH 1300 Speech Communication
    THEA 2305 Introduction to Theatre and Dance
    Any CHIN, FREN, GERM, INTR, or SPAN course

Additional Math and Science—in place of Fine Arts/Humanities/Social Sciences (6 hours)

    ERSC 3372 Surface Water Hydrology
    ERSC 4371 Engineering Geology

Second Language Proficiency (none required)

Major (92 hours)

Additional Mathematics Courses for Major (12 credit hours)

    MATH 1451 Calculus I
    MATH 1452 Calculus II
    MATH 2453 Calculus III


Statistics Requirement (3 hours)

    STAT 3352 Applied Statistics I

Construction Management and Civil and Construction Engineering Courses (77 credit hours)

    CNMG 1205 Drawings and Specifications
    CNMG 1205 Drawings and Specifications
    CNMG 1213 Civil and Construction Engineering Materials
    CNMG 2313 Construction Materials
    CNMG 2113 Construction Methods I
    CNMG 2314 Mechanical, Electrical, and Plumbing (MEP) Systems
    CNMG 2114 Construction Methods II
    CNMG 2316 Construction Surveying
    CNMG 1305 Drawings and Specifications
    CNMG 1313 Civil Engineering Materials with Lab
    CNMG 2313 Construction Materials and Methods
    CNMG 2314 Mechanical, Electrical, and Plumbing (MEP) Systems
    CNMG 2316 Construction Surveying with Lab
    CNMG 2370 Engineering Statics
    CNMG 3302 Engineering Economy
    CNMG 3312 Engineering Structural Analysis
    CNMG 3327 Field Engineering and Construction Equipment
    CNMG 3339 Estimating I
    CNMG 3347 Engineering Soil Mechanics with Lab
    CNMG 3371 Engineering Dynamics
    CNMG 3374 Hydraulic Engineering
    CNMG 3376 Engineering Structural Mechanics
    CNMG 3285 Civil Engineering Laboratory
    CNMG 4311 Estimating II
    CNMG 4321 Reinforced Concrete Design
    CNMG 4323 Construction Administration
    CNMG 4329 Construction Planning and Scheduling
    CNMG 4334 Construction Contracts and Law
    CNMG 4342 Construction Safety
    CNMG 4351 Foundation Design
    CNMG 4354 Highway Engineering
    CNMG 4357 Water and Wastewater Engineering
    CNMG 4371 Structural Steel Design
    CNMG 4285 Civil and Construction Engineering Design Project
    CNMG 4185 Professional Engineering Seminar

Minor (none required)

Unrestricted General Electives

Remaining hours, if any, to reach 120 minimum total hours, 45 hours of upper-level courses (3000-4000 level), or 30 hours in residence.

Professional Requirements

  • Pass the National Council of Examiners for Engineering and Surveying (NCEES) Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) Examination.
  • Pass the American Institute of Construction (AIC) Associate Constructor (AC) Examination.
  • Document at least 800 hours of practical work experience in approved construction-related activities, such as student competitions, part-time or full-time employment, internships, cooperative education, community service learning projects, or prior experience.

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Goals, Objectives, and Outcomes for the Civil and Construction Engineering Program

The goals of the civil and construction engineering program are to:

  • Prepare students for successful engineering or management careers in the architecture, engineering, and construction (AEC) industry or related fields.
  • Provide employers with a well-educated workforce that is ready and able to perform valuable civil and construction engineering and managerial services immediately after graduation.
  • Encourage the growth of knowledge-based industry and stimulate economic growth in Arkansas.

Program educational objectives are broad statements that describe what graduates are expected to attain within a few years after graduation. Program educational objectives are based on the needs of the program’s constituencies. The educational objectives of the civil and construction engineering program are to produce graduates who:

  1. Rapidly become certified Engineer Interns (EI) and Associate Constructors (AC) employed in architecture, engineering, construction, or related fields or pursuing graduate or professional education in engineering, business, law, architecture, etc.
  2. Become licensed Professional Engineers (PE) and/or Certified Professional Constructors (CPC) after gaining the required professional experience and the requisite knowledge to pass the licensing and/or certification exams.
  3. Engage in lifelong learning, through on-the-job training, participation in professional societies, additional formal education, continuing education and professional development, research, and self-study, in order to use state-of-the-art knowledge to design and build safe and effective buildings and infrastructure and/or provide high quality service to the general public, employers, clients, and other professionals.

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Student outcomes describe what students are expected to know and be able to do by the time of graduation. These relate to the knowledge, skills, and behaviors that students acquire as they progress through the program. The civil and construction engineering program will produce graduates who have:

  • An ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering.
  • An ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data.
  • An ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability.
  • An ability to function on multidisciplinary teams.
  • An ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems.
  • An understanding of professional and ethical responsibility.
  • An ability to communicate effectively.
  • The broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context.
  • A recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning.
  • A knowledge of contemporary issues.
  • An ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice.

Bachelor of Science in Architectural and Construction Engineering

The architectural and construction engineering program focuses on structural engineering, mechanical engineering, electrical engineering, and construction engineering, in the context of integrated building system design and construction. The program also introduces students to architectural history and design principles.

A minor is not required. Students seeking a Bachelor of Science degree in Architectural and Construction Engineering must pass each CNMG course with a grade of C or greater, must achieve at least a 2.00 grade point average (GPA) in the major (all required MATH, STAT, CHEM, PHYS, CNMG, and SYEN courses), and also must pass both the Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) and the Associate Constructor (AC) examinations.

Bachelor of Science in Architectural and Construction Engineering

General: 127 total hours, including 45 hours of upper-level courses (3000-4000 level), and 30 hours in residence

First-Year Colloquium (0-3 hours)

Required of full-time freshmen entering college for the first time and transfer students with less than 12 hours of credit. (See page 19 for details)
CNMG 1101 First-Year Colloquium in Construction
or any other FYC

Core (35 hours)

English/Communication Requirement (6 hours)

    RHET 1311 Composition I
    RHET 1312 Composition II

Math (3 hours)

    MATH 3322 Differential Equations

Science (8 hours)

    CHEM 1406 Engineering Chemistry
    PHYS 2321 Physics for Scientists and Engineers I
    PHYS 2121 Physics for Scientists and Engineers I Lab

U.S. History and Government Requirement (3 hours)

    HIST 2311 U.S. History to 1877
    or HIST 2312 U.S. History since 1877
    or POLS 1310 American National Government

Fine Arts/Humanities/Social Sciences (9 hours)

    ANTH 2316 Cultural Anthropology
    CRJU 2300 Introduction to Criminal Justice
    ECON 2301 Survey of Economics
    ENGL 2337 World Literature
    ENGL 2338 World Literature Themes
    ERSC 2300 Science and Technology in Society
    GEOG 2312 Cultural Geography
    GNST 2300 Introduction to Gender Studies
    HIST 1311 History of Civilization I
    HIST 1312 History of Civilization II
    MCOM 2330 Mass Media and Society
    MUHL 2305 Introduction to Music
    PHIL 2320 Ethics and Society
    POLS 2301 Introduction to Political Science
    PSYC 2300 Psychology and the Human Experience
    RELS 2305 World Religions
    SOCI 2300 Introductory to Sociology
    SPCH 1300 Speech Communication
    THEA 2305 Introduction to Theatre and Dance
    Any CHIN, FREN, GERM, INTR, or SPAN course

Additional Math and Science—in place of Fine Arts/Humanities/Social Sciences (6 hours)

    STAT 3352 Applied Statistics I
    ERSC 4371 Engineering Geology

Second Language Proficiency (none required)

Major (92 hours)

Additional Mathematics Courses for Major (12 credit hours)

    MATH 1451 Calculus I
    MATH 1452 Calculus II
    MATH 2453 Calculus III

Additional Math/Science Requirement (4 hours)

    PHYS 2322 Physics for Scientists and Engineers II
    PHYS 2122 Physics for Scientists and Engineers II Laboratory

Construction Management and Civil and Construction Engineering Courses (68 credit hours)

    CNMG 1305 Drawings and Specifications
    CNMG 1313 Civil Engineering Materials with Lab
    CNMG 2313 Construction Materials
    CNMG 2314 Mechanical, Electrical, and Plumbing (MEP) Systems
    CNMG 2370 Engineering Statics
    CNMG 3302 Engineering Economy
    CNMG 3312 Engineering Structural Analysis
    CNMG 3327 Field Engineering and Construction Equipment
    CNMG 3339 Estimating I
    CNMG 3371 Engineering Dynamics
    CNMG 3374 Hydraulic Engineering
    CNMG 3376 Engineering Structural Mechanics
    CNMG 3378 Engineering Thermodynamics
    CNMG 3285 Civil Engineering Laboratory
    CNMG 4311 Estimating II
    CNMG 4323 Construction Administration
    CNMG 4329 Construction Planning and Scheduling
    CNMG 4334 Construction Contracts and Law
    CNMG 4342 Construction Safety
    CNMG 4371 Structural Steel Design
    CNMG 4379 Heat Transfer
    CNMG 4380 HVACR Engineering Fundamentals
    or CNMG 4321 Reinforced Concrete Design
    CNMG 4285 Civil and Construction Engineering Design Project
    CNMG 4185 Professional Engineering Seminar

Systems Engineering Courses (8 hours)

    SYEN 2315 Circuits and Systems
    SYEN 2115 Circuits and Systems Laboratory
    SYEN 3358 Fundamentals of Power Systems
    SYEN 3158 Fundamentals of Power Systems Laboratory

Minor (none required)

Unrestricted General Electives

Remaining hours, if any, to reach 120 minimum total hours, 45 hours of upper-level courses (3000-4000 level), or 30 hours in residence.

Professional Requirements

  • Pass the National Council of Examiners for Engineering and Surveying (NCEES) Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) Examination.
  • Pass the American Institute of Construction (AIC) Associate Constructor (AC) Examination.
  • Document at least 800 hours of practical work experience in approved construction-related activities, such as student competitions, part-time or full-time employment, internships, cooperative education, community service learning projects, or prior experience.

Goals, Objectives, and Outcomes for the Architectural and Construction Engineering Program

The goals of the architectural and construction engineering program are to:

  • Prepare students for successful engineering or management careers in the architecture, engineering, and construction (AEC) industry or related fields.
  • Provide employers with a well-educated workforce that is ready and able to perform valuable architectural and construction engineering and managerial services immediately after graduation.
  • Encourage the growth of knowledge-based industry and stimulate economic growth in Arkansas.

Program educational objectives are broad statements that describe what graduates are expected to attain within a few years after graduation. Program educational objectives are based on the needs of the program’s constituencies. The educational objectives of the architectural and construction engineering program are to produce graduates who:

  1. Rapidly become certified Engineer Interns (EI) and Associate Constructors (AC) employed in architecture, engineering, construction, or related fields or pursuing graduate or professional education in engineering, business, law, architecture, etc.
  2. Become licensed Professional Engineers (PE) and/or Certified Professional Constructors (CPC) after gaining the required professional experience and the requisite knowledge to pass the licensing and/or certification exams.
  3. Engage in lifelong learning, through on-the-job training, participation in professional societies, additional formal education, continuing education and professional development, research, and self-study, in order to use state-of-the-art knowledge to design and build safe and effective buildings and/or provide high quality service to the general public, employers, clients, and other professionals.

Student outcomes describe what students are expected to know and be able to do by the time of graduation. These relate to the knowledge, skills, and behaviors that students acquire as they progress through the program. The architectural and construction engineering program will produce graduates who have:

  • An ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering.
  • An ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data.
  • An ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability.
  • An ability to function on multidisciplinary teams.
  • An ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems.
  • An understanding of professional and ethical responsibility.
  • An ability to communicate effectively.
  • The broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context.
  • A recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning.
  • A knowledge of contemporary issues.
  • An ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice.

Bachelor of Science in Environmental Engineering (proposed)

Note: At the time of printing, the environmental engineering program had not yet received final approval from the Arkansas Department of Higher Education. For current information about this program, please contact Nick Jovanovic in ETAS 202F, call (501) 569-8226, or send e-mail to nsjovanovic@ualr.edu.

The environmental engineering program focuses on the transport and fate of chemical species in air, water, and soil. For example, environmental engineers design air pollution control devices, water and wastewater treatment plants, and solid waste management systems.

A minor is not required. Students seeking a Bachelor of Science degree in Environmental Engineering must pass each CNMG course with a grade of C or greater, must achieve at least a 2.00 grade point average (GPA) in the major (all required MATH, STAT, BIOL, CHEM, ENHS, ERSC, PHYS, and CNMG courses), and also must pass the Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) examination.
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