Department of Earth Sciences

Fribrough Hall, Room 307, (501) 569-3546, (501) 569-3271 (fax), Website, View/Download PDF Version

Chairperson:
Connelly, Jeffrey B., Professor

Professors:
Connelly, Jeffrey B.
McMillan, Margaret E.

Assistant Professors:
DeAngelis, Michael T.
Ruhl, Laura S.
Shroat-Lewis, René A.

Instructors:
Spinler, Joshua C.

The Department of Earth Sciences offers a Bachelor of Science in Geology, with an optional concentration in Environmental Geology. Areas of study can include (but are not limited to): climate studies, energy resources, engineering geology, environmental geochemistry, geochemistry, geoinformatics (including GIS), geomorphology, geoscience education, hydrogeology, isotope geochemistry, medical geology, mineralogy, oceanography, paleontology, petrology, petroleum geology, planetary geology, sedimentology, seismology, stratigraphy, structural geology, tectonics, and volcanology. The department’s goals are to relate these areas of study to understanding the Earth, and how Earth processes affect and are affected by humanity. Students are encouraged to obtain a scientific understanding of earth systems on a global scale.

The Earth Sciences provide career opportunities for employment in industry, government, and teaching. Students interested in this area of study are urged to consult the departmental faculty regarding curricular plans and career goals. The department also offers minors in Geology and Environmental Geology, and a graduate certificate in Geospatial Technology. Departmental faculty also advise graduate students in the Applied Sciences graduate program.

General Information

EarthSciencePhoto3Professional courses, numbered 3320 and above, are designed for geology majors and minors; biology, chemistry, physics, and engineering majors; students interested in science teaching; and for other students with deeper interest in the field. For example, ERSC 3460, 4322, 4353, and 4421 are recommended for biology students; ERSC 4372, 4322, 4323, 4421, and 4473 are recommended for all students in environmental fields; and ERSC 4371, 4372, and 4473 are recommended for students in civil engineering, environmental engineering, and construction management.

For freshmen and sophomores who are interested or think they may be interested in teaching, please see the UALRTeach website (ualr.edu/ualrteach/) for more information about the UALRTeach program.


Laboratory Science Requirement Courses

The core curriculum requirements for Laboratory Science may be met by taking any of the following courses:

    ERSC 1302 Physical Geology and ERSC 1102 Physical Geology Laboratory
    ERSC 1304 Earth and the Environment and ERSC 1104 Earth and the Environment Laboratory
    ERSC 2303 Historical Geology and ERSC 2103 Historical Geology Laboratory

Goals, Objectives, and Outcomes of the B.S. in Geology Program

The goals of the program are to:

  1. Prepare students for successful scientific, technical or management careers in the geosciences or related fields
  2. Provide employers with a well-educated workforce that is ready and able to perform valuable scientific, technical or managerial services immediately after graduation
  3. Encourage the growth of knowledge-based industry and stimulate economic growth in Arkansas
  4. Program educational objectives are broad statements that describe what graduates are expected to attain within a few years after graduation. Program educational objectives are based on the needs of the program’s constituencies. The educational objectives of the program are to produce graduates who:
    • are able to begin productive careers as professional geologists engaged in continuous professional growth along their chosen career path;
    • are able to become Geologist in Training (GIT) and are able to become licensed Professional Geologists (PG) after gaining the required professional experience and the requisite knowledge to pass the licensing exams;
    • are knowledgeable of fundamental mathematics, chemistry, and physics in preparation for advanced instruction and professional practice in geology or related fields, or for pursuing graduate or professional education in geology or related fields; and
      engage in lifelong learning, through on-the-job training, participation in professional societies, additional formal education, continuing education and professional development, research, and self-study, in order to use state-of-the-art knowledge to solve geologic problems and/or provide high quality service to the general public, employers, clients, and other professionals.

EarthSciencePhoto2Student outcomes describe what students are expected to know and be able to do by the time of graduation. These relate to the knowledge, skills, and behaviors that students acquire as they progress through the program. Students finishing the program in will have:

  • an ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science and applied science to geological problems;
  • an ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data;
  • an ability to formulate or design a system, process, or program to meet desired needs. (For geologists, this will include one or more of the following considerations: the distribution of physical and chemical properties of earth materials, including water, energy resources and other natural resources; the effects of natural surface and subsurface processes; the impacts of human activities on these materials and processes);
  • an ability to function on multidisciplinary teams;
  • an ability to identify, formulate, and solve geological problems;
  • an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility;
  • an ability to communicate effectively;
  • the broad education necessary to understand the impact of geological solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context;
  • a recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning;
  • a knowledge of contemporary issues; and
  • an ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern scientific and technical tools necessary for professional practice.

Bachelor of Science in Geology

General: 120 minimum total hours, including 45 hours of upper-level courses (3000-4000 level), and 30 hours in residence

First-Year Colloquium (0-3 hours)

Required of full-time freshmen entering college for the first time and transfer students with less than 12 hours of credit. (See page 36 for details)

Core (35 hours)

See “General Education Requirements.” (Geology majors should complete the following for their Laboratory Science core requirement: ERSC 1302/1102 or ERSC 1304/1104; ERSC 2303/2103)

Second Language Proficiency (none required)
Major (62-64 hours)
Earth Science Foundation Courses (31 hours)
    (ERSC 1302 Physical Geology and ERSC 1102 Physical Geology Laboratory)
    or (ERSC 1304 Earth and the Environment and ERSC 1104 Earth and the Environment Laboratory)
    ERSC 2303 Historical Geology
    and ERSC 2103 Historical Geology Laboratory
    ERSC 3320 Field Geology I
    ERSC 3410 Mineralogy
    ERSC 3411 Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology
    ERSC 3430 Structural Geology
    ERSC 3440 Sedimentology and Stratigraphy
    ERSC 4190 Senior Seminar
    ERSC 4320 Field Geology II
ERSC Electives (9 hours)

Select at least 9 hours from any 3000-4000 level ERSC courses (except ERSC 3390, which may not be counted toward the BS in Geology).

Supporting Courses (23 hours)
    CHEM 1402 General Chemistry I
    CHEM 1403 General Chemistry II
    PHYS 1321 College Physics I
    and PHYS 1121 College Physics I Laboratory
    with PHYS 1322 College Physics II
    and PHYS 1122 College Physics II Laboratory
    or PHYS 2321 Physics for Scientists and Engineers I
    and PHYS 2121 Physics for Scientists and Engineers I
    Laboratory with PHYS 2322 Physics for Scientists and
    Engineers II and PHYS 2122 Physics for Scientists and
    Engineers II Laboratory
    MATH 1451 Calculus I
    or Math 1311 Applied Calculus I
    Any one of the following courses:
    MATH 1452 Calculus II, MATH 1312 Applied Calculus II, STAT 2350 Introduction to Statistical Methods, STAT 3352 Applied Statistics I
Minor (none required)
Unrestricted General Electives

Remaining hours, if any, to reach 120 minimum total hours, 45 hours of upper-level courses (3000-4000 level), and/or 30 hours in residence.


ASBOG Fundamentals of Geology Examination

The department recommends that Geology majors take the ASBOG Fundamentals of Geology licensing exam in their senior year or immediately after graduation. The following courses are recommended as preparatory courses for the Fundamentals of Geology exam:

    ERSC 1302 Physical Geology
    and ERSC 1102 Physical Geology Laboratory
    ERSC 2303 Historical Geology
    and ERSC 2103 Historical Geology Laboratory
    ERSC 1304 Earth and the Environment
    and ERSC 1104 Earth and the Environment Laboratory
    ERSC 3320 Field Geology I
    ERSC 3372 Surface Water Hydrology
    ERSC 3410 Mineralogy
    ERSC 3411 Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology
    ERSC 3430 Structural Geology
    ERSC 3440 Sedimentology and Stratigraphy
    ERSC 3460 Paleobiology
    ERSC 4320 Field Geology II
    ERSC 4322 Environmental Geology
    ERSC 4371 Engineering Geology
    ERSC 4373 Hydrogeology
    ERSC 4419 Geomorphology

BS in Geology: Environmental Geology Concentration

General: 120 minimum total hours, including 45 hours of upper-level courses (3000-4000 level), and 30 hours in residence

First-Year Colloquium (0-3 hours)

Required of full-time freshmen entering college for the first time and transfer students with less than 12 hours of credit. (See page 36 for details)

Core (35 hours)

See “General Education Requirements.” (Geology majors should complete the following for their Laboratory Science core requirement: ERSC 1302/1102 or ERSC 1304/1104; ERSC 2303/2103)

Second Language Proficiency (none required)
Major/Minor (75-77 hours)
Earth Science Foundation Courses (38 hours)
    (ERSC 1302 Physical Geology and ERSC 1102 Physical Geology Laboratory)
    or (ERSC 1304 Earth and the Environment and ERSC 1104 Earth and the Environment Laboratory)
    ERSC 2303 Historical Geology and ERSC 2103 Historical Geology Laboratory
    ERSC 3320 Field Geology I
    ERSC 3410 Mineralogy
    ERSC 3411 Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology
    ERSC 3430 Structural Geology
    ERSC 3440 Sedimentology and Stratigraphy
    ERSC 4190 Senior Seminar
    ERSC 4320 Field Geology II
    ERSC 4322 Environmental Geology
    ERSC 4421 Intro to Geographic Information Systems (GIS)
Electives (select 15 hours, up to seven of which may be from the non-ERSC courses listed below)
    ERSC 3380 Oceanography
    ERSC 3460 Paleobiology
    ERSC 4195, 4295, 4395 Internship in Earth Science
    ERSC 4199, 4299, 4399, 4499 Special Topics (must be approved)
    ERSC 4323 Geology of Arkansas
    ERSC 4353 Geology and Ecology of the Bahamas
    ERSC 4371 Engineering Geology
    ERSC 4372 Surface Water Hydrology
    ERSC 4391 Cooperative Education in Earth Science
    ERSC 4419 Geomorphology
    ERSC 4422 Applied GIS
    ERSC 4426 Introduction to Remote Sensing
    ERSC 4473 Hydrogeology
    BIOL 3303 Principles of Ecology
    BIOL 4310 Evolution
    BIOL 4402 Limnology
    BIOL 4415 Biometry
    BIOL 4421 Introduction to GIS
    CHEM 4342 Environmental Chemistry
    CNMG 3347 Engineering Soil Mechanics
    PHYS 3320 Physics of the Earth
Supporting Courses (22-24 hours)
    CHEM 1402 General Chemistry I
    CHEM 1403 General Chemistry II
    PHYS 1321 College Physics I
    and PHYS 1121 College Physics I Laboratory
    with PHYS 1322 College Physics II
    and PHYS 1122 College Physics II Laboratory
    or PHYS 2321 Physics for Scientists and Engineers I
    and PHYS 2121 Physics for Scientists and Engineers I
    Laboratory with PHYS 2322 Physics for Scientists and
    Engineers II and PHYS 2122 Physics for Scientists and
    Engineers II Laboratory
    MATH 1451 Calculus I
    or MATH 1311 Applied Calculus I
    Any one of the following:
    MATH 1452 Calculus II, Math 1312 Applied Calculus II, STAT 2350 Introduction to Statistical Methods, STAT 3352 Applied Statistics I
Minor (none required)
Unrestricted General Electives

Remaining hours, if any, to reach 120 minimum total hours, 45 hours of upper-level courses (3000-4000 level), and/or 30 hours in residence.


ASBOG Fundamentals of Geology Examination

The department recommends that Geology majors take the ASBOG Fundamentals of Geology licensing exam in their senior year or immediately after graduation. The following courses are recommended as preparatory courses for the Fundamentals of Geology exam:

    ERSC 1302 Physical Geology
    and ERSC 1102 Physical Geology Laboratory
    ERSC 2303 Historical Geology
    and ERSC 2103 Historical Geology Laboratory
    ERSC 1304 Earth and the Environment
    and ERSC 1104 Earth and the Environment Laboratory
    ERSC 3320 Field Geology I
    ERSC 3372 Surface Water Hydrology
    ERSC 3410 Mineralogy
    ERSC 3411 Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology
    ERSC 3430 Structural Geology
    ERSC 3440 Sedimentology and Stratigraphy
    ERSC 3460 Paleobiology
    ERSC 4320 Field Geology II
    ERSC 4322 Environmental Geology
    ERSC 4371 Engineering Geology
    ERSC 4373 Hydrogeology
    ERSC 4419 Geomorphology

Minor in Geology

Required Courses (8 hours)
    ERSC 1302 Physical Geology
    and ERSC 1102 Physical Geology Laboratory
    ERSC 2303 Historical Geology
    and ERSC 2103 Historical Geology Laboratory
    Electives (select 12 hours of ERSC electives)

Minor in Environmental Geology

Required Courses (12 hours)
    ERSC 1302 Physical Geology and ERSC 1102 Physical Geology Laboratory
    ERSC 2303 Historical Geology and ERSC 2103 Historical Geology Laboratory
    ERSC 4421 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems
Electives (select 8 hours from the courses listed below)
    ERSC 3380 Oceanography
    ERSC 3390 Weather Studies
    ERSC 4195, 4295, 4395 Internship in Earth Science
    ERSC 4199, 4299, 4399, 4499 Special Topics (must be approved)
    ERSC 4322 Environmental Geology
    ERSC 4371 Engineering Geology
    ERSC 4373 Hydrogeology
    ERSC 4419 Geomorphology
    ERSC 4422 Applied GIS

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Courses in Earth Sciences (ERSC)