B.S.E. IN ELEMENTARY EDUCATION

A teacher is reading a book to a group of very young students sitting in a semicircle.

The Bachelor of Science in Education degree in elementary education provides a strong foundation for students wanting to teach preschool through fourth grade. This 120-hour program provides graduates with a comprehensive understanding of teaching young learners and of the need for a learning environment that is responsive to students’ developmental needs. Graduates for the program will be able to apply for teaching licensure in Arkansas.


4 STEPS TO YOUR TEACHING CAREER

Complete of all University Core requirements, or an Associate’s Degree, with a cumulative grade point average of 2.7.

Submit your Praxis CORE test scores to the Director of Teacher Licensure and Placement in the School of Education.

Complete and clear background checks for State Police, FBI, and Child Maltreatment Central Registry.

Fill out the online admissions application and submit the required materials to the UA Little Rock Office of Admissions.


WHY SHOULD YOU BECOME AN ELEMENTARY EDUCATOR?

Female teacher showing a young African American boy how to complete a project in a classroom.

Your Chance to Change the World

Students and faculty in the Elementary Education Program envision a world in which all children are equally encouraged and enabled to develop their interests and talents; a world where teachers represent the best efforts and hopes of the societies they serve and are respected for the importance of their work. Elementary educators are fundamental to helping children navigate the world around them by showing students that learning is relevant, useful, fun, and important. A good teacher has the chance to change the lives of their students, but also to help them co-create a pathway to limitless possibilities and opportunities.

Incredible Job Security and Opportunities for Advancement

While the licensure requirements vary from state to state, teachers who have established a good work ethic and reputation don’t have to worry too much about finding a job. Because teachers are in such high demand across the United States, you have almost guaranteed job security—especially kindergarten and elementary school teaching positions which are expected to increase by 7% by 2024 according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Education is probably one of the best fields for advancement because the possibilities are endless. You have the opportunity to not only guide new and experienced teachers through Lead Teacher appointments and mentorship programs, but also to shape the educational environment by becoming a curriculum specialist (math, literacy, special education, gifted and talented, etc.), guidance counselor, assistant principal, principal, or district level administrator.


WHAT YOU’LL STUDY

Up close image of a grey notebook and two pencils on a wooden table.

The program is committed to encouraging students from various backgrounds to pursue an interest in the field with the intention of providing a diversity of teachers to meet the needs of diverse communities across the state. Our mission is aligned with the overall goals of the professional societies that devote their efforts to improving the lives of children in the broadest sense, realizing that children’s mental growth does not occur independent of the cultures, families, political, and economic conditions within which they exist. Our teacher preparation program believes that enhancing the lives of children within this context will ultimately nurture competent citizens for our community and society.

Admission, Program, and Graduation Requirements

Apply for Undergraduate Admission to UA Little Rock

  1. Visit apply.ualr.edu to complete an application for undergraduate admission and submit the $40 non-refundable application fee.
  2. Applicants with fewer than 12 transferable college credit hours should request that an official high school transcript or GED scores be sent to the Office of Admissions. Only official transcripts will be accepted, and must be submitted in a sealed, stamped envelope from the issuing institution or sent via electronic data interchange from the high school.
  3. Applicants with fewer than 12 transferable college credit hours may need to request official ACT or SAT scores from the testing agency (UA Little Rock ACT Code 0132; UA Little Rock SAT code 6368) if the official high school transcript does not include scores and s/he did not indicate UA Little Rock as a score recipient at the time of testing. ACT, SAT, COMPASS or Accuplacer scores must be from tests taken within the last five Students have the option of taking the Accuplacer test available through UA Little Rock Testing Services.
  4. Any applicant previously enrolled at another institution(s) must request that an official college transcript(s) be sent to the Office of Admissions. Only official transcripts will be accepted, and must be submitted in a sealed, stamped envelope from the issuing institution or sent via electronic data interchange from the previous institution. Students may submit an official “In Progress” transcript from the institution at which s/he is currently enrolled for admission purposes, but will still be required to submit a final, official transcript once all grades have been posted. Freshmen who completed high school concurrent credit at an institution other than UA Little Rock must submit an official college transcript.
  5. Students born after January 1, 1957, must submit proof of two MMR (measles, mumps, and rubella) immunizations.

For more detailed information regarding admission requirements, please review the Undergraduate Catalog or visit the UA Little Rock Office of Admissions website.

Transfer Student Admission

Transfer students must be academically advised before registering for classes. Students who are undecided on a major are advised in the Office of Undergraduate Academic Advising. Students who have decided on a major should make an appointment with an advisor in the academic department offering the major.

Students may potentially enroll in UA Little Rock courses prior to final transcript credit articulation. Transfer credit articulation is an ongoing process that can only be completed once a student submits all final transfer credits and the credits are posted to the UA Little Rock transcript. Because transfer credit articulation impacts course placement and registration, transfer students with a provisional admission status may need registration overrides into core, major, or minor courses during the first semester on campus. The process of transfer credit articulation may take several weeks at minimum to process after a student has been fully admitted to UA Little Rock. For more details regarding transfer credits, please review the Undergraduate Catalog or visit the Transfer Student Services website.

Community College Transfers

Students transferring to UA Little Rock from two-year colleges are subject to these provisions. Students must first consult with Academic Advising to articulate transfer coursework prior to being admitted to the College of Education and Health Professions. Students seeking admission to the elementary education programs must schedule an appointment with the CEHP Advising & Support Center (Dickinson Hall 300 | 501-682-8625 | cehpadvisingandsupport@ualr.edu). If a student has completed the Associate of Arts in Teaching (AAT) at a two year institution, core requirements at UA Little Rock will be met.

Students Who Transfer from Four-Year Institutions

These provisions listed for community college transfers may also apply to transfer work from four-year institutions that are either accredited by CAEP, formerly known as the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE), or approved as teacher education institutions by the state in which they are located.


Program Admission

The following are minimum criteria for consideration for admission to the program. For admission to Fall and Spring Block I, all applicants must

  • be formally admitted to UA Little Rock;
  • have completed RHET 1311 and 1312 English Composition, SPCH 1300, MATH 1321 or 1302 with a grade of C or greater in each of these courses;
  • have completed all core requirements with an overall degree plan cumulative GPA of at least 2.7 or have completed an associate degree from an accredited college that meets university core requirements*; and
  • submit passing scores on the Praxis Core exam**.
* Contact the Student Transfer Services office (501-682-1286) for more information.
** Note that Praxis and/or GRE scores take approximately three (3) weeks for UA Little Rock to receive the scores.

Retention Requirements

Retention decisions are the responsibility of the faculty. Once admitted, students are required to maintain a 2.75 grade point average, with at least a C in all courses specific to the elementary program. In addition, students’ professional behaviors, content knowledge, and classroom performance will be evaluated throughout the program. Successful completion of the licensure program is not based solely on the number of course credits, but requires demonstration of specified professional knowledge, skills, and behaviors. While a student may require additional time to meet some performance expectations, the faculty may limit that time and reserves the right to remove a student from the program should appropriate progress not be demonstrated.


Graduation Requirements

  • Completion of all courses on degree plan with grades as required and passing scores on all required Praxis exams (see Licensure Officer for correct Praxis exams to take) and the Principles of Learning and Teaching (PLT).
  • Entry of all required artifacts into Chalk and Wire and submission of these artifacts for assessment in Chalk and Wire.
  • Submission of Graduation Application on Boss by announced deadline.
  • Licensure

    Applicants must provide the following items to the College of Education and Health Professions Licensure Officer:

    For more information concerning licensure, contact the College of Education and Health Professions Licensure Officer, Dickinson Hall, Room 419.

Curriculum

First-Year Colloquium (0-3 hours)

Required of full-time freshmen entering college for the first time and transfer students with less than 12 hours of credit. Recommended First Year Colloquium course is TCED 1100 Intro to Teaching and Learning.

University Core (35 hours)

Must be completed before admission into this program as well as passing the Praxis examination.

Second Language Proficiency (none required)

Major (86 hours)

Floating Block (10 hours)

The following courses can be taken before entering the program, during the summer, or anytime during the program:

  • HHPS 3330 Teaching Physical Education
  • MUED 3232 Elementary Classroom Music
  • ARED 3245 Art for Elementary Teachers
  • HIST 4355 History of Arkansas
Program Courses (76 hours)

Formal admission to the Elementary Education program is required to take any of the following courses.
Block I (17 hours)

  • ELEM 2200 Field Experience I Grades K-2
  • ELEM 2300 Foundations of Elementary Education
  • ELEM 2301 Children’s Literature K-6
  • ELEM 2302 Child Growth & Development
  • ELEM 2303 Emergent Literacy
  • ELEM 2304 Integrated Science I

Block II (17 hours)

  • ELEM 3200 Field Experience II Grades 3-4
  • ELEM 3300 Building Learning Environments
  • ELEM 3301 Integrated Literacy and Language I
  • ELEM 3302 Social Studies Methods
  • TCED 4300 WS: Math Methods (K-3) OR MATH 3380 Math I for Elementary Education
  • LANG 4324 Teaching People of Other Cultures*

Block III (17 hours)

  • ELEM 4200 Field Experience III Grades 5-6
  • ELEM 4300 Assessment Methods K-6
  • ELEM 4301 Integrated Literacy & Language II
  • ELEM 4302 Integrated Science II
  • MATH 3382 Math Methods II
  • SPED 4301 Education of Exceptional Learners

Block IV (12 hours)

  • ELEM 4304 Internship Seminar I
  • ELEM 4600 Internship I Grades K-3
  • ELEM 4305 Collaboration with Families

Block V (12 hours)

  • ELEM 4306 Internship Seminar II
  • ELEM 4900 Internship II Grades 4-6

Minor (none required)
Unrestricted General Electives
Students may take general elective courses to fulfill any remaining hours to reach the 120 minimum total hours, the 45 hours of upper-level courses (3000-4000 level), or the 30 hours in residence.

* LANG 4323 Second Language Acquisition or LANG 4322 Teaching Second Languages may be substituted for LANG 4324.

Course Descriptions

Elementary Education Courses

ELEM 2200 Field Experience I Grades K-2
This field experience will acquaint candidates with a variety of primary school experiences. Candidates will be oriented to the structure of school district, the school, and the classroom setting. Students are placed with a cooperating teacher in a kindergarten, first, or second grade classroom for the full day each Friday for 14 weeks. Candidates are required to submit a field reflection each week to their university supervisor, and organize a field notebook with the required items. Two credit hours.

ELEM 2300 Foundations of Elementary Education
Prerequisites: admission to the elementary education program. The information provided in this course will equip candidates with basic psychological sophistication to prepare him/her for classroom teaching. Theories and examples of theories will be discussed to help candidates understand how to apply theories to classroom teaching. An emphasis is placed on the intelligent use of theory and research to improve instruction. Candidates will focus on theories in field settings. Three credit hours.

ELEM 2301 Children’s Literature K-6
Prerequisite: admission to the elementary education program. Corequisite: ELEM 2200 Field Experience I. Candidates explore a broad range of children’s literature genres, including literature from different cultures and informational texts for students in K-6 grades. Candidates learn criteria information for evaluating and selecting quality, developmentally appropriate reading materials in order to create a literate classroom environment for all students. The course will include a focus on using wide reading and genres to develop and implement activities aligned with Common Core State Standards’ literacy goals in language arts, social studies, science and math. Three credit hours.

ELEM 2302 Child Growth and Development
Prerequisite: admission to the elementary education program. Corequisite: ELEM 2200 Field Experience I. Corequisite: concurrent enrollment in ECED 2200 is required. Study of environmental and hereditary influences on cognitive, affective, and psychomotor development of typically and atypically developing children from birth to adolescence. Students consider both predictable developmental patterns and unique patterns due to sexual, socioeconomic, cultural, and normal variations in inherited characteristics. Students observe, record, and analyze behavior and development of children in an educational setting. Three credit hours.

ELEM 2303 Emergent Literacy
Prerequisites: admission to the elementary education program. Emergent Literacy focuses on the foundations of emergent and early literacy in a natural learning environment for the grades K-2. Emphasis will be given to learning to teach through the components of a balanced literacy program with special attention placed on designing and managing literate environments, appropriate book selection, language development activities, and using observational assessment strategies to guide instruction. Three credit hours.

ELEM 2304 Integrated Science I
Prerequisites: admission to the elementary education program. This course teaches science content knowledge for K-3. This course involves planning and facilitating of research-based science teaching strategies, the selection and use of materials, and implementation of assessment theory and techniques. Candidates will design and implement grade-level appropriate instructional activities by their understanding of what it means to know and learn science. Candidates will work in teams to formulate questions, make predictions, design investigations, collect and analyze data, make products and share ideas. Additionally, this course explores ways in which curriculum and technology are used in classroom settings to build relationships among teachers and students. Candidates will learn how content and pedagogy combine to make effective teaching. Three credit hours.

ELEM 3200 Field Experience II Grades 3-4
Candidates spend one full day a week for 14 weeks in a classroom with young children in grades 3 or 4. Two credit hours.

ELEM 3300 Building Learning Environments
Prerequisites: admission to the elementary education program, ELEM 2200 Field Experience I, and ELEM 2302 Child Growth and Development. Corequisite: ELEM 3200 Field Experience II. Candidates will learn how to design, establish, and maintain effective learning environments including both the physical and psychosocial environments. Candidates will learn the theoretical base and applied strategies for guiding students from diverse backgrounds towards becoming cooperative, contributing, self-disciplined, and critical-minded participants in schools. Candidates will practice applying strategies in a field/lab setting. Three credit hours.

ELEM 3301 Integrated Literacy and Language I
Prerequisites: admission to the elementary education program and ELEM 2303 Emergent Literacy. This course focuses on the foundations of early and fluent stages of literacy in a natural learning environment for second grade through fourth grade children. Emphasis will be given to learning to teach through the components of a comprehensive literacy program with special attention placed on designing and managing literate environments, appropriate book selection, word building activities to promote visual processing strategies, comprehension development, and using observational assessment strategies to guide instruction. Three credit hours.

ELEM 3302 Social Studies Methods
Prerequisites: admission to the elementary education program. This course provides the opportunity for candidates to analyze and develop integrated curricula in social studies from a variety of historical and current perspectives, within the context of professional, state and local standards. Candidates integrate knowledge from the six disciplines of social studies (history, anthropology, sociology, political science, geography, and economics) into the design of a constructivist, inquiry-based social studies curriculum. The course explores ways children come to learn about themselves and others. There is an emphasis on meeting the needs of all children, including attention to diverse linguistic and cultural backgrounds, and different learning abilities and styles. Three credit hours.
ELEM 4200 Field Experience III Grades 5-6
Candidates spend one full day a week for 14 weeks in a classroom with children in grades 5 or 6. Candidates are required to submit a field reflection each week to their university supervisor. Two credit hours.

ELEM 4300 Assessment Methods K-6
A study of fundamental observation, assessment, and evaluation concepts and tools. Emphasis placed on both qualitative and quantitative methods of reporting student progress. Principles of classroom test construction, alternative assessment techniques, and measurement strategies at various developmental levels will be addressed. Students will learn to accurately interpret standardized test results and be exposed to ethical and legal considerations surrounding use and reporting of assessment results. Three credit hours.

ELEM 4301 Integrated Literacy and Language II
Prerequisites: admission to the elementary education program, ELEM 2301 Children’s Literature, ELEM 3301 Integrated Literacy and Language I. Corequisite: ELEM 4200 Field Experience III. This course focuses on effective literacy instruction in the upper elementary grades (4-6). Teacher candidates will learn how to plan and implement instruction for all learners that continue the development of reading and writing in a balanced literacy setting with emphasis on fluency, vocabulary development, and comprehension in expository and informational texts. Content includes, but is not limited to, major approaches for teaching literacy, effective strategies for differentiating literacy instruction, teaching students how to effectively read and comprehend complex texts, systematic assessment of reading and writing, and an introduction to critical literacy. Three credit hours.

ELEM 4302 Integrated Science II
This course teaches science content knowledge for 4-6 grade-level students. This course involves planning and facilitating of research-based science teaching strategies, the selection and use of materials, and implementation of assessment theory and techniques. Candidates will design and implement grade-level appropriate instructional activities by their understanding of what it means to know and learn science. Candidates will work in teams to formulate questions, make predictions, design investigations, collect and analyze data, make products and share ideas. Additionally, this course explores ways in which curriculum and technology are used in classroom settings to build relationships among teachers and students. Candidates will learn how content and pedagogy combine to make effective teaching. Three credit hours.

ELEM 4304 Internship Seminar I
Prerequisites: admission to the elementary education program. Co-requisite: ELEM 4600 Internship I. This seminar is designed to advance the knowledge, skills, and dispositions introduced and developed throughout the program. Topics address all four domains of the assessment criteria for internship, planning and preparation, the classroom learning environment, teaching, and professionalism. Particular attention is focused on the teacher as decision-maker and the link between assessment and pedagogical decision-making. All aspects of the class will require candidates to connect the course content to their daily experiences in their K-3 internship classroom. Three credit hours.

ELEM 4305 Collaboration with Families
This course focuses on understanding parental issues and concerns within diverse family systems, understanding the dimensions of parenting children from birth to adolescence, and knowledge of multicultural perspectives in parenting and in planning parenting education strategies. In addition, strategies to build successful partnership with community agencies will be explored. Class will research a variety of parenting education models and their effectiveness in increasing parental involvement in schools. Three credit hours.

ELEM 4306 Internship Seminar II
Prerequisites: admission to the elementary education program. Co-requisite: ELEM 4900 Internship II. Internship Seminar II is concurrent with the candidate’s final field experience. It further advances the knowledge, skills, and dispositions introduced and developed throughout the program. Topics address all four domains of the assessment criteria for internship, planning and preparation, the classroom learning environment, teaching, and professionalism. Candidates’ analyses of day to day teaching experiences are integrated into the discussion of these topics. Internship Seminar II concludes with a week-long on-campus workshop in which candidates prepare a portfolio of materials for applying for jobs and for supporting them through their first year of teaching. Three credit hours.

ELEM 4600 Internship I Grades K-3
Prerequisites: admission to the elementary education program. Co-requisite: ELEM 4304 Internship Seminar I and ELEM 4305 Collaboration with Families. Internship I is one full semester in a kindergarten, grade 1, grade 2, or grade 3 classroom. It is designed such that the candidate begins with observation and selected teaching activities and gradually assumes complete responsibility for teaching in the classroom. They will plan, teach, assess, and reflect on all aspects of the teaching process including communication with colleagues and families and collaboration with teaching partners. Candidates will prepare for children with special needs. They are expected to use all of the resources of the school and exhibit competence with technology. Six credit hours.

ELEM 4900 Internship II Grades 4-6
Prerequisites: admission to the elementary education program. Co-requisite: ELEM 4306 Internship Seminar II. Internship II is one full semester in a grade 4, 5, or 6 classroom. It is designed such that the candidate begins with observation and selected teaching activities and gradually assumes complete responsibility for teaching in the classroom. They will plan, teach, assess, and reflect on all aspects of the teaching process including communication with colleagues and families and collaboration with teaching partners. Students will prepare for student with special needs. They are expected to use all of the resources of the school and exhibit competence with technology. Nine credit hours.

Interdepartmental Courses

ARED 3245 Art for Elementary Teachers
An investigation of elementary-level art education focusing on materials and methods for teaching art history, art criticism, and studio production to children. Attention is given to the relationship of the visual arts to general education, developmental growth of children in art, curriculum planning, and current issues in art education. This course is offered for preprofessional teachers in the College of Education’s Early Childhood Education program. Two credit hours.

HHPS 3330 Teaching PK-6 Physical Education
This course is designed to help students understand the need for an effective pre kindergarten–6 physical education program. It will provide the prospective PK-6 school classroom teacher, as well as the PK-6 physical education specialist, with a knowledge base in the principles of physical fitness, elementary physical education curriculum planning and appropriate selection of physical activities for children. The students will be working with hands-on projects integrating the discipline of physical education and other curriculum subjects found in grades PK-6th. Proper nutrition for the elementary student will also be discussed. Three hours lecture per week. Three credit hours.

HIST 4355 History of Arkansas
Focuses on selected topics central to Arkansas history, covering its political, social, cultural, geographic, and economic development from settlement to present. Dual-listed in the Graduate Catalog as HIST 5355. Three credit hours.

LANG 4324 Teaching People of Other Cultures
Prerequisite: junior standing. Cultural issues for teaching students with limited English proficiency. A required course for ESL endorsement in the state of Arkansas. Dual-listed in the Graduate Catalog as LANG 5324. Three credit hours.

MATH 3382 Mathematics II for Elementary Education
Prerequisites: admission to the elementary education program and successful completion (C or greater) of MATH 3380. Second mathematics education course for elementary education majors, K-6. Problem-solving, estimation, number sense, development of computational algorithms, mental computation techniques, measurement of two- and three-dimensional objects, geometry, probability, data collection and analysis, technology, proportional reasoning, and historical developments in mathematics. Emphasis on problem solving, reasoning, communication, connections, and CCSS. Two hours lecture and two hours laboratory. Three credit hours.

MUED 3232 Elementary Classroom Music
The emphasis is on activities, creative projects, and developing vocal and instrumental skills useful to the early childhood teacher for both musical and non-musical integrated classroom activities. Students will develop skills in making lesson plans for musical activities and integrating music with the other arts, other subjects, and other peoples, places, and cultures. Not open to music majors for credit. Two credit hours.

SPED 4301 Education of Exceptional Learners
Prerequisite: PSYC 2300 or consent of instructor. Introduction to the psychological, sociological, philosophical, legal, and educational implications of educating exceptional learners in the mainstream; the role of teachers, professionals, and parents as team members in providing appropriate education and necessary adaptations for exceptional learners. Dual-listed in the Graduate Catalog as SPED 5301. Three credit hours.

TCED 1100 Introduction to Teaching and Learning
This course satisfies the First-Year Course requirements for first-year students and is an introduction to teaching and learning in American elementary and secondary schools. The course is open for all first-time students, but is especially applicable for those who may be considering a major or minor in education and teaching as a career. The course includes introductions to the field of education, current issues in teaching and learning in schools, and a service-learning project involving the teaching and learning of school-age students in the Little Rock area. One credit hours.

TCED 4300 WS: Math Methods (K-3)
Prerequisites: admission to the elementary education program. This course provides learning opportunities for teacher candidates to develop sound mathematical understanding based on the needs and developmental characteristics of K-3 students. The course emphasizes a hands-on approach using manipulates in a lab setting to develop specific instructional techniques for that maximize success in the child’s learning of mathematics. Three credit hours.


MEET OUR FACULTY

Portrait of Dr. John Burgin.

John Burgin, Ph.D.

Associate Professor, Undergraduate Coordinator

Contact Information
Portrait of Dr. Anarella Cellitti

M. Anarella Cellitti, Ph.D.

Associate Professor

Contact Information
Faculty placeholder image.

Anne C. Lindsay, Ph.D.

Associate Professor

Contact Information
Portrait of Dr. Katina Leland.

Katina M. Leland, Ed.D.

Associate Professor

Contact Information

HAVE QUESTIONS? ASK AN ADVISOR.

We’re always happy to answer any questions you might have about our available programs. Use the form below to submit your inquiries to the College of Education and Health Professions Advising & Support Center advisors.

  • What questions do you have for the advising staff?
  • What semester term do you have questions about?
  • What year do you have questions about?
    Which program do you have questions about?