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See-A-Song displays artistic use of language

Submitted by Kerissa Accetta on November 2, 2012 – 3:28 pmNo Comment

Kendra Roy, a senior interpreting major, performs “Find You on my Knees” by Kari Jobe at the annual See-A-Song performance in the Stella Boyle Smith Concert Hall on Oct. 30.

Students performed songs in American Sign Language at the Stella Boyle Smith Concert Hall for an enthusiastic crowd of  both deaf and hearing members of the community at the Department of Interpreter Education and the Sign Language Klub’s annual See-A-Song Oct. 30.  This year’s theme was “So You Think You Can Sign.”

“I thought the performance was awesome because it was something that I never experienced before. Usually, when trying to watch people sign, I feel awkward and think it’s creepy to stare,” said Kari Payton, 
a sophomore majoring in mechanical systems engineering.

Individuals and groups of performers with various backgrounds in ASL signed a variety of songs, including “Barbie Girl” by Aqua, “We Are the Champions” by Queen, and “Marry You” by Bruno Mars.

Ernie Northup, the treasurer for the Arkansas Association of the Deaf, and his daughter Katie Northup were the emcees for the night.  The duo signed and kept the crowd in laughter as interpreters Jami Hollingsworth and Clint Brockway voiced the signs for the hearing members of the audience.

Not only is participating in See-A-Song an opportunity for ASL students to practice their skills, said Darlene Bagley, a senior interpreting major. “It’s a great spotlight to show what Sign Language can be.”

The event introduced members of the audience to a more artistic use of ASL.

“Signing seems cool because it looks so personal. People have to display their emotions not only with their hands, but their faces and body movement,” Payton said. “Even though I did not understand, I felt enlightened by the expressions and characters.”

“It was a lot of fun; it’s always a lot of fun,” said Mary Adams, a senior interpretation major.

 

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