Research

Articles

Robinson, A. (2013). Psychological science, talent development and advocacy: Lost in translation? Gifted Child Quarterly, 56, 202-205.

Dailey, D., Cotabish, A., & Robinson, A. (2013). Peer coaching in the elementary science classroom: A catalyst for success. Tempo. Manuscript accepted for publication.

Cotabish, A., Dailey, D., Hughes, G. & Robinson, A. (2013).  The effects of a STEM intervention on elementary students’ science knowledge and skills. School Science and Mathematics.*

Robinson, A., (2012). Can innovation save gifted education?: 2010 NAGC presidential address. Gifted Child Quarterly, 56(1), 40-44.*

Cotabish, A., Robinson, A. Dailey, D. & Hughes, G. (2011). The effects of a gifted education STEM project on elementary teachers’ science process skills and knowledge of science content. Research in the Schools, 18(2), 16-25.*

Books

IL Final CoverA Century of Contributions to Gifted Education traces the conceptual history of the field of gifted education. Bookended by Sir Francis Galton’s Hereditary Genius published in 1869, and Sidney Marland’s report to the United States Congress in 1972, each chapter represents the life and work of a key figure in the development of the field.

While the historical record of gifted education has previously been limited, A Century of Contributions to Gifted Education explores the lives of individuals who made fundamental contributions in the areas of eminence, intelligence, creativity, advocacy, policy, and curriculum. Drawing heavily on archival research and primary source documentation, expert contributors highlight the major philosophical, theoretical, and pedagogical developments in gifted education over the course of a century, providing both lively biography and scholarly analysis

What people are saying about the book:

  • “This fascinating book is an absolute must-read for anyone interested in gifted education! This highly readable and engaging text provides both a historical foundation for those ideas that shaped our field and also provides a revealing glimpse into the personal lives of these founders that is very different from what we have known before.”—Tonya R. Moon, Professor, University of Virginia, USA
  • “I learned something new, and occasionally roguish, about everyone portrayed in this volume, including those whom I knew personally or had taught about in courses. Except for the opening two chapters in Great Britain and France, plus a rather somber visit to Poland, these biographies are strongly focused on lives lived primarily in the USA where so much innovation and research on gifted education has flourished, a phenomenon illuminated by these stories and their archival reference lists—my appetite is whetted for volume two!”—Bruce M. Shore, Professor Emeritus of Educational Psychology, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
  • “The best way to understand present issues, practices, and controversies in gifted education is to examine our historical roots and the contributions of people who were the pioneers of this fascinating field of study. This book takes us to a new level of understanding by analyzing and interpreting the works of our most creative and innovative forerunners. A unique contribution, it is destined to be a classic in our field.”—Joseph S. Renzulli, Director, The National Research Center on the Gifted and Talented, Raymond and Lynn Neag Professor of Gifted Education and Talent Development, University of Connecticut, USA

Chapters

Robinson, A. & Simonton, D.K. (2013). Catharine Cox Miles and the lives of others. In A. Robinson & J. Jolly (Eds.), A century of contributions to gifted education: Illuminating lives. New York, NY: Routledge.

Robinson, A., MacFarlane, B.D., and Dailey, D. (2013) A. Harry Passow: Curriculum, advocacy, and diplomacy for talent development. In A. Robinson & J. Jolly (Eds.), A century of contributions to gifted education: Illuminating lives. New York, NY: Routledge.

Robinson, A. (2013). Teacher characteristics. In C. M. Callahan & J. Plucker (Eds.), Critical issues and practices in gifted education, 2nd ed. Waco, TX: Prufrock.

Robinson, A. & Stein, M.K. (2013). Evidence-based practices as a model for RtI and the development of talents. In Mary Ruth Coleman & Susan Johnsen (Eds.), RtI: Gifted education with multi-tiered systems of support. Waco, TX: Prufrock.

Robinson, A. (2012). The case approach: Translating research to professional development. In Subotnik, R., Robinson, A., Callahan, C. & Johnson, P. (Eds.), Malleable minds: Translating insights from psychology and neurosciences to gifted education (pp. 191-197).  University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT: National Research Center on the Gifted and Talented.

Robinson, A. & Callahan, C. (2012). On the malleability of minds and the development of talents. In Subotnik, R., Robinson, A., Callahan, C. & Johnson, P. (Eds.),  Malleable minds: Translating insights from psychology and neurosciences to gifted education (pp. 3-5).  University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT: National Research Center on the Gifted and Talented.

Curriculum

Blueprints for Biography: Differentiating the Curriculum for Talented Readers

  • A Blueprint for Biography is a guide for teachers and students engaged in the study of a specific biography.
  • Available on Marian Anderson, Alexander Graham Bell, George Washington Carver, Marie Curie, Thomas Edison, Albert Einstein, Galileo Galilei, Mary Kingsley, Ada Lovelace, Louis Pasteur,  John B. Stetson, Vincent Van Gogh, Walt Whitman, and Orville, Wilbur, and Katherine Wright.

STEM Education

Project STEM Starters in funded by a five-year Research and Development Jacob K. Javits Grant from the U.S. Department of Education. Principal Investigators: Dr. Alicia Cotabish and Dr. Ann Robinson.

Four (4) major components of Project STEM Starters:

  • Professional Development (STEM Starters Summits and STEM Starters Institutes),
  • Inquiry-Based Science Curriculum
  • Supplemental Materials Development
  • Technical Assistance (Peer Coaching and Evaluation Teams).