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History

Course Listings

1311. History of Civilization I

Recommended prerequisite: Rhetoric 1311. The history of the world’s significant civilizations from their beginnings to approximately A.D. 1600: the development of integrated political, social, economic, religious, intellectual, and artistic traditions and institutions within each of those cultures; significant intercultural exchanges. Three credit hours.

1312. History of Civilization II

Recommended prerequisite: Rhetoric 1311. The history of the world’s significant civilizations since approximately A.D. 1600; examination of the persistence of traditional civilizations and the changes in the world order due to the development of modern industrial society, modern science, and the nation state. Three credit hours.

2311. U.S. History to 1877

Description, analysis, and explanation of the major political, social, economic and diplomatic events through “Reconstruction.” Special attention is devoted to the cross-cultural development of three civilizations, Native American, European, and African, within the geographical context of the North American continent. Major topics for study include European colonial empires; the American Revolution; the Constitution of 1787; evolution of a national government, federal in system and republican in form; social and economic theories and practices; relationship with foreign governments; and the American Civil War. Three credit hours.

2312. U.S. History Since 1877

Description, analysis, and explanation of the political, social, economic and diplomatic events to the present time. Special attention is devoted to the forces of Modernity and the impact of cultural pluralism on traditional institutions. Major topics for study include industrialization; agrarianism; labor immigration; reform movements; total and limited war economic theory and practice, and the U.S.’s role in world affairs. Three credit hours.

3301. Ancient History and Thought

Social, intellectual, and cultural history of ancient Mesopotamian, Egyptian, Greek, and Roman peoples. Three credit hours.

3302. History of Ancient Greece

A political, constitutional, and social history of Greece from the Homeric Age to the fall of the Athenian Empire in 404 B.C. Three credit hours.

3303. The Hellenistic Age

The study of Greek civilization from the fall of the Athenian empire (404 B.C.) through the reign of Alexander the Great to the collapse FAO his successor’s kingdoms before the advance of Rome (c. 146 B.C.). Three credit hours.

3304. History of the Roman Republic

The history of the expansion of the city of Rome from a small village on the banks of the Tiber to a world empire. Three credit hours.

3305. History of the Roman Empire

A history of the Roman Empire from the reign of Augustus and the rise for Christianity to the end of antiquity. Three credit hours.

3312. History of Medieval Civilization

A study of the interaction of the social class structure and Christianity in forming the institutions of medieval civilization (c. A.D. 1000-1350). Three credit hours.

3313. The Renaissance, 1300-1550

A study of urban and court life at the time of the Renaissance. Examines such themes as humanism, the arts, discovery, and gender issues in Italy and northern Europe. Three credit hours.

3315. Early Modern Europe, 1600-1815

Survey of major developments from the Thirty Year’s War through the French Revolution. Examines the role of international conflict, national state building, commercialization, the scientific revolution, and the enlightenment in the formation and disintegration of the Old Regime. Three credit hours.

3316. Europe in the Age of Revolution, 1789-1914

Survey of European history from the French Revolution to the outbreak of the First World War. Emphasis on revolutionary movements, nationalism, industrialization, class society, and imperialism. Three credit hours.

3317. Twentieth-Century Europe

World War I and its consequences; depression; totalitarianism; World War II; the reconstruction of Europe; the Cold War. Three Credit hours.

3321. History of Britain to 1688

The period from the earliest times to the end of the Glorious Revolution. Three credit hours.

3322. History of Britain since 1688

The period from the Glorious Revolution to the present. Three credit hours.

3323. British Empire

The political, social, and economic development of the British Empire and the foundations of the Commonwealth, and the emergence of the dominions and the dependent empire as autonomous units with the Commonwealth. Three credit hours.

3325. History of Russia to 1917

History of Russia from prehistoric origins through, Kievan, Muscovite, and Tsarist periods with consideration of political, intellectual, economic, and religious factors. Emphasis on Tsarist policies. Three credit hours.

3326. History of the Soviet Union

Establishment and consideration of the Soviet regime from the perspectives of internal affairs, economic planning, military policy, and foreign relations. Emphasis on the Bolshevik mastery of Russia and the Soviet Union’s subsequent disintegration. Three credit hours.

3328. Modern France

The French political community from the Old Regime to the Fifth Republic, with emphasis on the interrelationship of politics, class, and culture. Three credit hours.

3330. Early Modern Germany since 1806

Survey of the major social, political, and cultural developments in Germany from the Reformation to the French Revolution. Topics include political fragmentation and intra-German conflict, religious conflict, absolutism, the Enlightenment, the collapse of the Holy Roman Empire as well as everyday life, art, and literature. Three credit hours.

3331. Modern Germany since 1806

German history from the French Revolution to Re-Unification. Topics include nationalism and unification, revolutionary movements, industrialization and class society, Nazism and the Holocaust, post-war division, democratization and Europeanization, reunification, and the shifting nature of German identity. Three credit hours.

3336. Islam and the Modern Middle East

An examination of the role of Islam as the primary cohesive element in the social, political, and cultural development of the Modern Middle East. Comparison and contrast of Western and Middle Eastern perspectives on relevant current issues. Same as Religious Studies 3336. Three credit hours.

3341. East Asia Foundations: Culture & History to 1600

Development of the political, economic, social, and intellectual patterns within the East Asian cultural sphere from prehistory to the sixteenth century, with an emphasis on China and Japan. Three credit hours.

HIST 3342 Modern East Asian Transformations

Early modern East Asian development, reaction to contacts with Western Civilization, continuity, modernity, and revolution from the sixteenth century to the present. Three credit hours.3345. People’s Republic of China

The history of the origins of the Chinese Communist Party and of the development of China under Communist rule. Three credit hours.

3345. People’s Republic of China

The history of the origins of the Chinese Communist Party and of the development of China under Communist rule. Three credit hours.

3347. History of Japan

Development of the political, social, economic, and intellectual patterns of Japanese life from prehistory to the present. Three credit hours.

3351. Colonial America, 1607-1763

English settlements in the New World, the development of colonial society, American colonies, the British Empire. Three credit hours.

3352. American Revolution, 1763-1787

Colonial society in 1763, British imperial policy and the American response, the war for independence, effects of the Revolution on American ideas and institutions. Three credit hours.

3353. The New Republic: The U.S., 1787-1824

The formation of the Constitution, the emergence of American political institutions, economic and social development, and nationalism. Three credit hours.

3355. American Civil War and Reconstruction, 1848-1876

The origins of the American Civil War, its course, and subsequent efforts at reconciling North and South. Emphasis on the social, economic, and cultural background to the war and its impact on American society. Three credit hours.

3356. The Gilded Age: The U.S., 1876-1900

United States history from the end of Reconstruction through the presidential administration of William McKinley. The course emphasizes the changing characteristics of America in this era, including the farmer’s revolt, industrialization, foreign affairs, and major social trends. Three credit hours.

3357. The Age of Reform: The U.S., 1900-1939

The political, economic, social, and diplomatic development of the United States between 1900 and 1939. Three credit hours.

3358. Recent America: The U.S., 1939-present

A history of the American people in recent times, including economic, social, and cultural developments as well as political, diplomatic, and military events. Three credit hours.

3371. History of Latin America: Colonial Period

Formation of the Latin American countries stressing political, economic, social, and cultural factors as well as the role of Latin America in world affairs. Three credit hours.

3372. History of Latin America: Republican Period

Formation of the Latin American countries stressing political and cultural factors as well as the role of Latin America in world affairs. Three credit hours.

3375. Modern Mexican History

A study of political, social, and economic developments in Mexico since 1870. Industrialization, nationalism, foreign intervention, and multinational corporations as they relate to Mexican development and the 1910 Mexican Revolution. Three credit hours.

3380. The Indian in American History

A survey of red-white relations from first contacts through the creation of a reservation system in the 1800 and the removal of the Indians. Same as American Studies 3380. Three credit hours.

4301. History of Technology

A survey of the role of technology from the Stone Age to the nuclear age. Three credit hours.

4302. Magic, Science, and the Occult from Antiquity to Newton

A survey of humans’ attempts to explain and control the cosmos from antiquity to the emergence of modern science around 1700, including the contributions of pseudo-scientific, occult, and magical world-views; internal developments in history of science; and the relationship between scientific thought and the historical context. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as HIST 5302. Three credit hours.

4304. Alexander the Great.

This undergraduate/graduate seminar will examine the career of one of the most interesting and important figures in world history. Alexander expanded the domain of Greek civilization from the Mediterranean and Aegean Seas to the lands of Afghanistan and India.  Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as HIST 5304. Three credit hours.

4305. Environmental History

Study of humanity’s interrelationship with the natural environment throughout history, with emphasis on historical factors relating to current environmental problems. Three credit hours.

4306/5306. History with Objects

Prerequisite: History 2311, 2312, or consent of instructor based on individual student need and ability. The role of objects in U.S. History including how different academic disciplines study artifacts; how to identify, authenticate, and evaluate artifacts (using decorative arts to learn visual literacy); and the impact of objects (especially their manufacturing and marketing) on American life. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as HIST 5306. Three credit hours.

4308. The Roman Revolution

This seminar will examine the fall of the Roman Republic and the rise of the Roman Empire.  Students in this seminar are expected to acquire a reasonable mastery of major events and developments of this transitional period and to demonstrate at least adequate skill in written analysis of this material.  Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as HIST 5308. Three credit hours.

4309. The Historian’s Craft

This course offers an introduction both to historical methods (how historians go about doing history) and to historiography (the study of the many ways in which historians have written about the past), through a focus on a single historical topic. Three credit hours.

4312. Medicine, Miracles, and Magic: Early History of Healing in Medieval and Renaissance Europe

A holistic examination of various ways in which Europeans sought to cure disease in pre-modern times. Magic folk cures, and miracles, as well as the work of physicians, apothecaries, and barber surgeons. The emergence of medicine as a profession and a science. How university-trained physicians came to dominate the healing professions. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as HIST 5312. Three credit hours.

4313. Apocalypse Now and Then: A History of Apocalyptic Thought and Movements

This course offers a history of beliefs about the end of the world in the western Judeo-Christian tradition. Through lectures and readings, we will examine such topics as the birth of apocalyptic thought, the medieval development of various aspects of traditions about the End (such as the figure of Antichrist and millenarian traditions), millennial influences on the discovery and colonization of the New World, millennial movements of the last two centuries (such as the Millerites and the Mormons), and contemporary apocalyptic scenarios. A major theme of the course will be the flexibility of apocalyptic language, its ability to interpret various historical situations, and its power to move people to acceptance or action. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as HIST 5313. Three credit hours.

4314. A History of the Future: Millennial Visions in Film and Literature

Examines past moments in which people take stock of the present by gazing into the future. Through literature and film, studies predictions oft he future in their historical contexts. Looks at positive and negative views of the future, secular and religious predictions for humans’ fate. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate catalog as 5314. Three credit hours.

HIST 4315 Religious History of the United States
Development of Protestantism including evangelicalism, new denominations, and fundamentalism; incorporation of Catholicism and Judaism into main stream; relationship between religion and social and political issues including church and state; minority religious beliefs and organizations; varying role of men and women in religious organizations. Dual listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as HIST 5315. Three credit hours.

HIST 4316 Ideology and Revolution in Eighteenth-Century Europe

The late eighteenth century age of revolution and its background. The crisis of the Old Regime; the contributions of Jansenism, the Enlightenment, constitutionalism, and the politics of gender to the formation of a revolutionary ideology; the course of revolution during the last decade of the eighteenth century. Emphasis on France, but some attention to Britain, Germany, Italy, and America. Three credit hours.

HIST 4318 Modern Revolutions: From France to China

A comparative examination of five modern revolutions: the French Revolution (17891815), The Meiji “Restoration” in Japan (18531890), the Mexican Revolution (19101920), the Russian Revolution (19171932), and the Chinese Revolution
(19191949). We will consider such issues as the extent of real turnover in the state apparatus, the prevalence of state driven “revolutions from above” as opposed to classic “revolutions from below” in modern history, the balance of internal and external causation, and the nature of revolutionary violence. Dual listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as HIST 5318. Three credit hours.

HIST 4319 Military History of the Western World

A survey of military developments from the time of the Greeks until the end of World War II. The course investigates how internal institutions, international goals, organizational skills, leadership, and the application of technology by nations have affected the evolution of warfare in the West. These factors are examined to help students understand the nature of Western military systems and how they have been used as instruments of national policy. Three credit hours.HIST 3326 The Soviet Union and Russia since 1917

Survey of major social, political, and cultural developments including the Russian Revolution, Stalinism, the Cold War, everyday life, the collapse of the Soviet Union, and the post Soviet era. Three credit hours.

4322. Honors Thesis

In this course students will write a thesis, under the guidance of a thesis committee, based on research in primary sources. Prior to enrolling in the class a student must discuss possible topics with the faculty member(s) with whom s/he plans to work, and draft a thesis proposal. On acceptance fo the thesis proposal, students will be cleared to enroll in the thesis class. Three credit hours.

4326. History of the Atlantic World

This course examines the processes which brought together the history of Europe, Africa, North American and South America across the Atlantic Ocean. Major themes include the Atlantic Ocean as frontier and zone of interaction as well as political, economic and social changes resulting from inter-Atlantic connections. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as HIST 5326. Three credit hours.
4333. European Social and Cultural History

Interdisciplinary survey of major European social and cultural developments from the Enlightenment to the present. Explores the interrelationship between a changing society and its beliefs; examines the political impact of modern ideologies, the sciences, and the arts. Three credit hours.

4335. History at the Movies

This course is designed to introduce students of the past to the potentials and pitfalls of film as a medium of historical exposition. Over the course of the twentieth century, the movies became a primary medium of artistic and commercial expression. The advent of commercial film-making in America also marked the first appearance of a particular “genre” of cinematic form-a “historical drama” was one of the first full-length feature films made in the United States, in 1915. Entitled Birth of a Nation, the movie purported to be a historical “facsimile” that chronicled the aftermath of the Civil War in the United States. It’s commercial success guaranteed that movies with historical themes would continue to be made. Ever since, the makers of motion pictures have found the past to be a creative playground and a lucrative idiom. How do these movies relate to History. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as HIST 5335. Three credit hours.
4338. Holocaust

The Holocaust is both a German and international event. Major topics include the tradition of anti-Semitism, the politics of immigration, the planning and execution of the Final Solution, Jewish and non-Jewish resistance, the complicity of non-Germans, the role of the Allied powers, and the settling of accounts at Nuremberg. Three credit hours.

HIST 4345 Chinese Film and History

This course looks at the traumatic twentieth century through the lenses of Chinese filmmakers, particularly focusing on how a century of revolution affected urban and rural areas, the roles of women, and the daily lives of people in general. Dual listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as HIST 5345. Three credit hours.

4350. The United States and the Middle East

The development of American foreign policy in the Middle East from 1900 to present. Students will gain an understanding of the critical factors that shape and influence contemporary US-Middle Eastern relations. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as HIST 5350. Three credit hours.
HIST 4352 The American West: Trans-Mississippi

A study of the westward expansion of the United States; United States penetration into the Tran Mississippi River West after the Lewis and Clark expedition; social, political, and economic development; culture of the indigenous Indians of the northern and southern plains. Three credit hours.4353. The Old South

The development of southern institutions and ideas from the colonial period through the Civil War. Three credit hours.

4353. The Old South

The development of southern institutions and ideas from the colonial period through the Civil War. Three credit hours.
4354. The New South

Continuity and change within the southern states from Reconstruction to the present. Three credit hours.

4355. History of Arkansas

Focuses on selected topics central to Arkansas history, covering its political, social, cultural, geographic, and economic development from settlement to present. Dual-listed in the UALR Graduate Catalog as HIST 5355. Three credit hours.

4359. American Urban History

Beginnings and growth of urbanization in America from colonial times to the present. Emphasis on the economic base of urban expansion; development of urban policies, services, and municipal administration; the image of the city in popular thought; the impact of industrialization, transportation, population, and the frontier on urbanization. Three credit hours.

4363. Law in American History

The development of legal institutions in America from their English origins to the present. The rule of law, legal thought and the legal profession, the independent judiciary, civil rights, and the law’s role in economic development. Three credit hours.

4364. History of American Enterprise

The development of business enterprise in America from its roots in English colonialism through the advent of industrialism; the growth of commerce, the geopolitical foundations of a national marketplace, and the dawn of the corporate age; the relationship between property and the state, social values and the profit motive; innovation and economic advance. Three credit hours.

4365. Modern U.S. Culture

An examination of the historical development of mass culture in modern America. Concentration on the historical dimensions of culture and the ways in which Americans have redefined their values in response to technological and social change. It will explore the impact of various mechanisms through which a mass culture emerged, including movies, magazines, radio, television. Considers the relationship between culture and national character as currently debated by leading historians. Three credit hours.

4367. American Labor History

A study of American labor history from colonial times to the present; indentured servitude, slavery, sea-going, and free labor, the impact of immigration and the introduction of the factory system, patterns of organization, mass production industries, automation, and the emergence of subsequent problems of the modern labor movement. Three credit hours.

4368. Black History to 1865

Lectures, selected readings, and discussion on phases of black development in America. Three credit hours.

4369. Black History Since 1865

A comprehensive study of the socioeconomic, cultural, and political development of African-Americans from the end of the Civil War to the present. Three credit hours.

HIST 4371 Women in World History

An examination of the conditions of women in history with emphasis on problems in European history; attitudes toward women as reflected in religious, legal, and philosophical literature; and the role expectations of women in various societies. Three credit hours.

4372. Perspectives on Women in American History

Consideration of conditions and problems of women in American history from colonial to modern times with reference to European background and parallels when appropriate. Three credit hours.

4373. Perspectives on Women in European History

An examination of the conditions of women in history with emphasis on problems in European history; attitudes toward women as reflected in religious, legal, and philosophical literature, and the role expectations of women in various societies. Three credit hours.

4378. The History of U.S.-Latin American Relations

Survey of U.S.-Latin American relations from the pre-Columbian period to the present with emphasis on the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Focus on the diplomatic and economic relationships, including dollar diplomacy, intervention, dictatorship, and revolution. Three credit hours.

4385. U.S. Diplomatic History to 1900

The origins, character, and consequences of United States foreign policy before the initial growth of the United States to a world power. Three credit hours.

4390. Special Topics in History

Specialized study of selected topics in history. Course content changes each semester; refer to the semester class directory. Three credit hours.

4391. Seminar in United States History

Prerequisites: History 2311, 2312, six hours of upper-level United States history. Advanced study of a topic in United States history chosen by instructor; includes a major research and writing project incorporating the department’s goals of identifying a problem; establishing a thesis; gathering, evaluating, and analyzing evidence; and writing in an appropriate scholarly format. Three credit hours.

4393. Seminar in World History

Prerequisites: History 1311, 1312, three hours of upper level non-United States history. Advanced study of a topic in nonUnited States history chosen by instructor; includes a major research writing project incorporating the department’s goals of identifying a problem; establishing a thesis; gathering, evaluating, and analyzing evidence; and writing in an appropriate scholarly format. Three credit hours.

4395. History Internship

Prerequisites: junior or senior standing, 15 credit hours of history. This course involves field experience with a history-related business or public agency. The student will work under the supervision of an individual at the internship agency and a member of the history faculty. The student must secure permission from both supervisors before registration. Three credit hours.

4396. Seminar in Arkansas History

Prerequisite: consent of an instructor. Discussion, directed readings, research, and writing on selected issues. Topics will vary. May be repeated as topics vary for up to six hours. A major research and writing project incorporating the department’s goals of identifying a problem; establishing a thesis; gathering, evaluating, and analyzing evidence; and writing in an appropriate scholarly format, is required. Three credit hours.

HIST 4397 Teaching Applications

The course links social studies content with practical applications for classroom instruction. The content information comes from history, geography, political science, sociology/anthropology, and psychology. This content is modeled for prospective secondary education teachers to illustrate how content can be applied in the classroom. The critical components of each of the disciplines will be integrated into the content presentations and the demonstrated applications. This course will be team taught. Same as GEOG 4397 and POLS 4397. Three credit hours.

4199,4299,4399. Independent Study

Prerequisites: senior standing, 15 credit hours of history. open to history majors only. For students of superior ability who seek special research in t he field. One, two, or three credit hours.

Updated 1.22.2014