ILTL Summer 2017 Conference Schedule

Institute for Law Teaching and Learning

Summer 2017 Conference

Teaching Cultural Competency and Other Professional Skills Suggested by ABA Standard 302

July 7-8, 2017

University of Arkansas at Little Rock William H. Bowen School of Law

 

Thursday, July 6, 2017

Welcome Reception:  5:00—7:00 p.m. 

Samantha’s Tap Room & Wood Grill, 322 Main Street, Little Rock, AR  72201

 

ALL OF THE FOLLOWING CONFERENCE EVENTS WILL TAKE PLACE AT THE UA LITTLE ROCK WILLIAM H. BOWEN SCHOOL OF LAW

 

Friday, July 7, 2017

REGISTRATION AND BREAKFAST: 8:00—8:30 a.m.
Student Lounge, Second Floor
OPENING AND WELCOME 8:30-9:00 a.m.
Room 305
Dean John M.A. DiPippa, UA Little Rock William H. Bowen School of Law
ILTL Co-Directors Emily Grant, Sandra Simpson, and Kelly Terry
WORKSHOP 1: 9:00—10:00 a.m.
Session B
Room 305
Bringing Marginalized Populations into the Classroom
Catherine Wasson, Thomas Noble, and Patricia Perkins, Elon University School of Law

Cultural awareness and professionalism are best taught by putting students in the role of lawyer. By “casting” members of marginalized populations in first-year writing assignments, the panelists ask students to confront their own biases and wrestle with the tensions between state authority and individual rights as they represent a client. In this interactive session, panelists will first describe assignments that they designed not only to teach skills and doctrine, but also to raise issues of professional identity and cultural awareness. They will then facilitate a workshop during which attendees will develop ideas for their own in-class simulations involving marginalized populations.
BREAK: 10:00-10:30 a.m.
WORKSHOP 2: 10:30—11:30 a.m.
Session B
Room 305

Building Student Capacity for Self-Evaluation
Lauren Onkeles-Klein and Robert Dinerstein, American University, Washington College of Law

While self-evaluation can strengthen and build cognitive skills, identifying how and where to build opportunities for self-evaluation into a classroom dynamic is difficult. This workshop will focus on two questions - why develop student-centered self-evaluation approaches and how to implement them. Legal professionals require an internal compass on performance evaluation to determine when external expectations are insufficient, inaccurate, or, in extreme situations, unethical. In this session, we will explore the theories behind self-evaluation, discuss how these theories affect legal skill growth, and dissect the good, bad, and ugly of our own experiences with student self-assessment.
LUNCH: 11:30 a.m.—12:30 p.m.
Student Lounge, Second Floor
WORKSHOP 3: 12:30—1:30 p.m.
Session A
Room 307

Using the Workshop Format to Introduce 1L Students to Professional Skills and Values
Sandra Simpson, Gonzaga University School of Law

The ABA has recognized that teaching professionalism and emotional intelligence in law schools is an important goal. The faculty, staff, alumni, and employers of students at Gonzaga University School of law recognized these types of skills are essential to having a rewarding career in the law. To that end, the faculty and staff built a committee that created a mandatory 1L professional-values workshop series which focused on helping students build a professional identity. The workshops covered subjects such as implicit bias, time management, and getting and giving feedback. At this Institute workshop participants will gain an understanding of how to build a similar program at their school, focusing on skills such as recruiting speakers using their alumni base, reading books to help them prepare to run the workshops, examining studies to familiarize themselves on the various subjects of the workshops, and learning the details needed to put on a successful workshop series at their home institution. From subjects of the workshops to the type of food to serve, participants will experience a hands-on planning workshop designed to help them create their own program.
Session B
Room 321

How to Grow Future Lawyers in the Image of ABA Standard 302: Plant Seeds of Strong Learning Outcomes in a Collaborative Cross-Curriculum Garden, and Sprinkle with a Healthy Dose of Ethics, Skills, Cultural Competency, Collaborative Exercises, and Self-Evaluative Techniques
Tracey Brame, Tonya Krause-Phelan, and Victoria Vuletich, Western Michigan University—Thomas M. Cooley Law School

The presenters teach various criminal, evidence, professional responsibility, race and cultural competency-based classes, and a public defenders clinic. By collaborating, co-teaching, and overlapping instructional tools, these professors are creating an innovative approach to learning outcomes and performance indicators that targets substantive legal knowledge; research and writing; critical thinking; professional judgment, values, and duties; resolving professional dilemmas; and legal advocacy skills. During this session, the presenters will demonstrate how collaborative, cumulative exercises and themes can be created by tweaking and building upon existing curriculum maps, learning objectives, and performance indicators. Attendees will participate in one of the presenters’ cumulative exercises.
BREAK: 1:30—2:00 p.m.
WORKSHOP 4: 2:00—3:00 p.m.
Session A
Room 307
Transaction Planning—Creating a Roadmap for Transactional Clinics
Joseph Pileri, Georgetown University Law Center, and Lauren Rogal, Vanderbilt University Law School

This workshop will introduce a method of teaching cultural competence in transactional lawyering, particularly the challenging process of creating a transaction plan. In creating a transaction plan, students utilize cross-cultural lawyering skills to identify client goals and priorities, develop legal strategies, sequence events and deliverables, set internal and external deadlines, and engage in an iterative process of evaluating project progress and seeking client input. The workshop will include (a) a description of our teaching method; (b) a simulation of the in-class exercise; and (c) a discussion about how to troubleshoot classroom challenges.
Session B
Room 321
Establishing Learning Outcomes, Cultural Competency, and the Underprepared Law Student as “Other”
Deborah Zalesne and David Nadvorney, CUNY School of Law

We believe a student’s academic intelligence is about more than simply cognitive skills; it’s akin to culture, including not only cognitive, but also affective and social skills, all of which contribute to a student’s level of success. Our workshop posits that for many faculty, seriously underprepared law students occupy a role as “other” just as students from vastly different cultures do. The workshop will emphasize the responsibility of the teacher to understand and bridge the gap that exists between students’ level of preparation and the goals of the course. In doing so, we will highlight the failure of traditional law school pedagogy to reach the underprepared student, and suggest a framework and materials for teaching the cognitive component of academic intelligence.
BREAK: 3:00—3:30 p.m.
WORKSHOP 5: 3:30—4:30 p.m.
Session A
Room 307

BUILDING ON BEST PRACTICES: A Resource and Advocacy Tool to Keep Our Teaching, Our Law Schools, and Legal Education on the Right Track with Teaching Professional Skills
Carolyn Wilkes Kaas, Quinnipiac University School of Law, and Melanie DeRousse, University of Kansas School of Law

BUILDING ON BEST PRACTICES: TRANSFORMING LEGAL EDUCATION IN A CHANGING WORLD sought to define emerging excellence in legal education, not focus on regulatory compliance. However, it now serves as a guide for law schools seeking to meet Standard 302 “skills” requirements. In particular, Chapter 6, “Teaching the Newly Essential Knowledge, Skills and Values in a Changing World,” addresses many of the “Other Professional Skills” identified in Standard 302. It contains suggested learning outcomes and assessment methods, and other data related to the need for reform. How can this book be a resource for implementation of Standard 302, whether for an individual course or the overall curriculum?
Session B
Room 321

“It’s All a Bit Hippy Isn’t It?”: The Importance of Teaching Self-Evaluation and Reflection in Law School
Andrew Henderson, University of Canberra (Australia)

This workshop will model a seminar lesson plan and two activities for introducing law students to the fundamentals of self-evaluation through reflective thinking and practice. Self-evaluation through reflection is a skill identified in both the ABA’s Standard 302(d) and in Threshold Learning Outcomes (TLOs) 2 and 6 for law students in Australia. Commentary on the TLOs has emphasised the development of self-evaluation and reflection as methods of addressing the disproportionately high rates of substance abuse and depression among lawyers and law students. This workshop will put the importance of self-evaluation in the wider context of supporting students’ mental health and wellbeing.
Trolley ServiceThe trolley will depart from the law school starting at 4:30 p.m., and will run continuously until 5:30 p.m.

 

Saturday, July 8, 2017

BREAKFAST: 8:30—9:00 a.m.
Student Lounge, Second Floor
WORKSHOP 6: 9:00—10:00 a.m.
Session A
Room 307
Teaching Cultural Competence as a Reflective Instructor
Andrij Kowalsky, Wilfrid Laurier University

ABA Standard 302 (d) requires instructors to teach cultural competence. Intercultural Teaching Competence (ITC) involves teaching to linguistically and culturally pluralistic students. This workshop intends to raise awareness of diversity by addressing ITC principles of: (1) developing an awareness of one’s own cultural and disciplinary identities and positionality in the classroom; (2) modelling and encouraging perspective-taking in the classroom; and, (3) modelling and encouraging non-judgmental approaches to exploring cultural, social or other difference. After this session, participants should appreciate the relationship between intercultural teaching competence in law and classroom practice.
Session B
Room 321

Helping Millenials Develop Self-Reflection
Benjamin Madison, Regent University School of Law

This presentation focuses on self-reflection as a professional skill. More specifically, we will address the difficulty millennials face here. We will ask participants to compare their own brief self-assessment with the typical results for millennials. Seeing the results, we can launch a highly interactive discussion on teaching methods to help millennials appreciate that knowing one’s limitations is as important as owning one’s strengths. We can also ask the audience to consider how reflection—over time—can lead to clarity of values, to ethical boundaries, and even to recognition of areas in which one has a passion that her legal training can fulfill.
BREAK: 10:00—10:30 a.m.
WORKSHOP 7: 10:30-11:30 a.m.
Session A
Room 307
Students Learning Lawyering Skills: Immerse Them
Christine Church, Western Michigan University—Thomas M. Cooley Law School

Students learn cultural competency, conflict resolution, collaboration, and self-evaluation best when they apply these concepts in simulated client representation. This workshop demonstrates a summer immersion program that integrates interviewing, counseling, negotiation, pretrial work and trial work in a Summer Skills Academy. JD Program Outcomes for skills and ethics can be assessed in the skills academy. Participants will receive fact patterns, rubrics, and syllabi to develop your own skills academy. Administration loves this model -- students can work during the week and get additional credits on weekends during the summer.
Session B
Room 321
Teaching Students to Receive Feedback
Miranda Johnson, Loyola University Chicago School of Law

The ability of law students and attorneys to solicit and respond to feedback from supervisors, colleagues and others can enhance the development of self-evaluation skills and other professional skills. This workshop will present a lesson plan used in a practicum seminar that has the dual purpose of teaching students (i) how to receive feedback better and (ii) how to improve their articulated learning goals. Participants will then engage in an interactive exercise aimed at applying this concept to their respective courses.
LUNCH: 11:30 a.m. —12:30 p.m.
WORKSHOP 8: 12:30—1:30 p.m
Session A
Room 307

The Role of Leadership in Law School Education (More Than Just an “Other” Skill)
Leah Witcher Jackson Teague, Baylor University School of Law

Since lawyers play critical leadership roles in both the public and private sector, law schools should be more intentional in preparing students for these important roles. This session begins with discussing why leadership development is important to the development of students’ professional identity and their future leadership roles in society. How leadership programming can help meet Standard 302(d) also will be discussed. Syllabi from leadership development courses at two law schools will be shared and discussed. Participants will engage in an experiential learning exercise to demonstrate how leadership development programming can benefit law students, law schools and our broader communities.
Session B
Room 321
Developing Critical Legal Reading and Analytical Skills Through the Use of Charts and Diagrams
Constance Fain, Texas Southern University Thurgood Marshall School of Law

The primary emphasis of this workshop will be on the creation and use of charts to enable students to diagram cases and course topics for the purpose of enhancing their critical reading and analytical skills for success in law school. The workshop will entail the use of an exercise involving a sample case to illustrate the development of the preceding skills. The session will be interactive by engaging the audience in the performance of the following tasks: small group collaboration and diagramming of a case using the chart as a guide; discussion of the chart information; and an overall assessment of the exercise.
CLOSING: 1:30—2:00 p.m.
Room 305
ILTL Co-Directors Emily Grant, Sandra Simpson, and Kelly Terry