Available GEM Courses

CCAF General Education

The following GEM approved courses are available that will satisfy the CCAF 15 hours of general education:

Oral Communication | Written Communications | Mathematics | Social Sciences | Humanities

Oral Communication ……………………….3 hours

gem_logoSpeech. Courses that prepare students to organize and deliver oral presentations to persuade, debate, argue or inform in a clear, concise and logical manner. Emphasis must be on content and delivery. Group and interpersonal communication courses are not acceptable.

SPCH 1300 – Speech Communication
This course helps students effectively deliver an oral presentation to an adult audience; listen to and critique objectively the oral presentations of others; effectively participate in one-to-one communication experiences using techniques of active listening, conflict resolution, and information gathering; organize, participate in, and lead small groups as they problem-solve; and recognize and use effective oral language as a tool of sound reasoning. Student performance is emphasized along with lecture, discussion, and self-instructional study center exercises. Students learn through writing, reading, discussing, listening, and participating in critical thinking and problem-solving activities. Three credit hours.

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Written Communication……………………….3 hours

English composition. Applicable communication courses must satisfy the delivering institutionā€™s writing and composition requirement for graduation. Business communication and technical writing courses are not acceptable. Higher-level writing and composition courses may be applied as a program elective.

RHET 1311 – Composition I
Prerequisite: A minimum ACT English score of 19, a minimum SAT I verbal score of 450, RHET 0310, or RHET 0321. Practice in writing, with an emphasis on personal, expressive writing, as well as transactional writing. Students will focus on organizing and revising ideas and writing well organized, thoroughly developed papers that achieve the writerā€™s purpose, meet the readersā€™ needs, and develop the writerā€™s voice. Final course grades are A, B, C, or NC. Students must complete this course with a grade of C or greater to take RHET 1312. Three credit hours.

RHET 1312 – Composition II
Prerequisite: RHET 1311 with a C or greater or equivalent. Those students required by state law to enroll in READ 0310 must successfully complete that course before enrolling in RHET 1312. Practice in writing, with an emphasis on academic forms. Students will focus on analysis, argumentation, research, and documentation writing. Final course grades are A, B, C, or NC. Three credit hours.

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Mathematics……………………….3 hours

Intermediate algebra or a college-level mathematics course that satisfies the delivering institutionā€™s mathematics requirement for graduation. Not acceptable courses include: accounting; business, consumer, technical, or computer mathematics; beginning or elementary algebra; statistics (taught outside the mathematics department); history of mathematics; and mathematics for elementary and secondary teachers. Three semester hours of mathematics are required for graduation. However, if an acceptable mathematics course is applied as a technical or program elective, a natural science course may be substituted for mathematics.

MATH 1302 – College Algebra
Prerequisite: A grade of C or greater in Math 0301 – Intermediate Algebra, an equivalent transfer course, or an ACT Mathematics score of 21, or ACT Elementary Algebra score of 11, or SAT Mathematics score greater than or equal to 500. (See Mathematics Placement Tests on page 176). Study of functions, including but not limited to, absolute value, quadratic, polynomial, rational, logarithmic, and exponential; systems of equations; and matrices. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

MATH 1321 Quantitative and Mathematical Reasoning
Prerequisite: A grade of C or greater in Intermediate Algebra or an equivalent transfer course, or a grade of AQ, BQ, CQ, in any of UALRā€™s Pre-Core Mathematics courses (MATH 0321, MATH 0322, MATH 0323, MATH 0324), or a MATH ACT score of 21 or greater, or an SAT Mathematics score of 500 or greater. The overarching goal of Quantitative and Mathematical Reasoning is to provide students with mathematical understandings and skills to be productive workers, discerning consumers, and informed citizens. Students will solve problems using mathematical reasoning involving logic, proportions, algebra, and relations. In keeping with the tenets of student performance in a general education course, this course is designed to deliver instruction that focuses on process, conceptual understanding, communication and problem solving found in the following strands: (a) Personal, state and national finance (b) Statistics and probability (c) Mathematical modeling (d) Quantities and measurement. Students seeking a degree in a Non-STEM major are advised to take this course. Note: This course satisfies the state mandated requirement for the baccalaureate degree. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours. (ACTS Course Number MATH 1003)

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Social Science……………………….3 hours

Courses from the following disciplines are acceptable: anthropology, archaeology, economics, geography, government, history, political science, psychology and sociology designed to impart knowledge, develop skills, and identify goals concerning elements and institutions of human society.

ECON 2301 Survey of Economics
The wants of individuals and societies are unlimited, while the resources for satisfying these wants are limited. Consequently, choices have to be made. Economics is the science of choice. Survey of Economics introduces students to the ability to use theories or models to make sense out of the real world and devise policy solutions to economic problems. Both individual and firm choices (microeconomics) and society choices (macroeconomics) are examined. The role of markets in summarizing choices and allocating resources is introduced. ECON 2301 will not satisfy the University Core Curriculum requirements if ECON 2322 and ECON 2323 are taken for graduation credit. Three credit hours.

GEOG 2312 Cultural Geography
The nature, distribution, and development of various cultural systems as they interact with each other and with their environment. A study is made of spatial patterns in the elements of culture, including population, religion, language, political ideology, economic activities, and settlement. Examination of the processes that have changed the natural landscape to a cultural landscape. Three credit hours. (ACTS Course Number GEOG 2113)

HIST 1311 – History of Civilization I
Recommended prerequisite: RHET 1311. The history of the worldā€™s significant civilizations from their beginnings to approximately AD 1600: the development of integrated political, social, economic, religious, intellectual, and artistic traditions and institutions within each of those cultures; significant intercultural exchanges. Three credit hours.

HIST 1312 – History of Civilization II
Recommended prerequisite: RHET 1311. The history of the worldā€™s significant civilizations since approximately AD 1600: examination of the persistence of traditional civilizations and the changes in the world order due to the development of modern industrial society, modern science, and the nation state. Three credit hours.

HIST 2311 – US History To 1877
Description, analysis, and explanation of the major political, social, economic and diplomatic events through ā€œReconstruction.ā€ Special attention is devoted to the cross-cultural development of three civilizations, Native American, European, and African, within the geographical context of the North American continent. Major topics for study include European colonial empires; the American Revolution; the Constitution of 1787; evolution of a national government, federal in system and republican in form; social and economic theories and practices; relationship with foreign governments; and the American Civil War. Three credit hours.

HIST 2312 – US History Since 1877
Description, analysis, and explanation of the political, social, economic and diplomatic events to the present time. Special attention is devoted to the forces of Modernity and the impact of cultural pluralism on traditional institutions. Major topics for study include industrialization; agrarianism; labor; immigration; reform movements; total and limited war; economic theory and practice; and the U.S.ā€™s role in world affairs. Three credit hours.

POLS 1310 – American National Government
An introduction to the political institutions, processes, and patterns of the national government of the United States, focusing on the Congress, presidency, and courts, and on their interrelationships. Attention is given to suffrage and elections, political parties, interest groups, and public opinion. Significant issues and problems of national policy such as civil rights and civil liberties are considered. Three credit hours.

POLS 2301 – Intro Political Science
Introduction to social science concepts as applied to political analysis. Analysis of individuals, groups, and society, particularly the study of social, economic, and political structures and behavior. Introduction to the discipline of political science as a social science, including enduring questions about politics, nature of political analysis, major theoretical and empirical approaches, and critiques of the discipline. Three credit hours.

PSYC 2300 – Psychology and the Human Experience
Prerequisite: RHET 1311. Focuses on development of the individual in the context of physical and social environments. Topics include the scientific method and its application to the study of the individual, the relationship between brain and behavior, social and personality development, theories of motivation, maladaptive behavior, social cognition and interaction, and the effects of membership in different groups. Students learn through writing, reading, discussing, listening, and participating in critical thinking and problem-solving activities. Three credit hours.

SOCI 2300 – Introduction to Sociology
Recommended: RHET 1311. Introduction to sociological concepts. Analysis of society, particularly the study of human organization. An overview of the theories and methods utilized in the discipline is provided and will be used as a framework for critical analysis. Students will learn to investigate group and societal connections in major social institutions-religion, family, politics, economics, education. Three credit hours.

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Humanities……………………….3 hours

Courses in fine arts (criticism, appreciation, historical significance), foreign language, literature, philosophy and religion are acceptable. Applied courses that teach how to play a musical instrument, perform a dance routine, or sculpt or draw an art form and sign language courses are not acceptable.

ARHA 2305 – Introduction to Visual Art
Recommended prerequisite: RHET 1311. Introduction to the creative process and history of art, vocabulary and descriptive terms used in the visual arts, and how to write about them. Attendance at arts events is required. Students will learn through writing, reading, discussing, listening, and participating in critical thinking and problem-solving activities. Fulfills core requirement in aesthetics along with studentā€™s choice of either MUHL 2305 and THEA 2305. Three credit hours.

ENGL 2337 – World Literature
Study of selected texts reflecting various Western and non-Western literary heritages and traditions. Assigned works represent several national literatures, with at least one major text from each of four periods (antiquity, medieval, early modern, and the modern period) and from a minimum of three literary genres. Requirements: completion of the first year writing requirement.

ENGL 2338 – World Literature Themes
This class addresses the same competencies as ENGL 2337, but through exploration of a specific topic. Either 2337 or 2338 satisfies the core requirement, but they are distinctive courses and both may be taken for credit. Requirements: completion of the first year writing requirement.

MUHL 2305 – Introduction to Music
Recommended prerequisite: RHET 1311. Introduction to the creative process and history of music, vocabulary and descriptive terms used in the musical arts, and how to write about them. Attendance at arts events is required. Students will learn through writing, reading, discussing, listening, and participating in critical thinking and problem-solving activities. Fulfills core requirement in aesthetics along with ARHA 2305 or THEA 2305. Three credit hours.

PHIL 2320 – Ethics & Society
Prerequisite: RHET 1311. Study of selected texts reflecting a variety of ethical systems from Western and non-Western literary heritages and ethical traditions. Assigned works represent several national ethical literatures, with at least one major ethical text from each of four periods (antiquity, medieval, early modern, and contemporary). Three credit hours.

RELS 2305 – World Religions
Prerequisite: RHET 1311 recommended. Examines the global patterns of contemporary world religions as symbol systems and expressions of discrete, coherent world views. Three credit hours.

SPAN 1311 – Elementary Spanish 1
A course for students with no knowledge of Spanish. Instruction in correct pronunciation, aural comprehension, and simple speaking ability. Three credit hours.

SPAN 1312 – Elementary Spanish 2
Prerequisite: SPAN 1311 or equivalent. Practice in correct pronunciation, aural comprehension, and simple speaking ability leading to mastery of basic grammar and limited reading ability. Three credit hours.

SPAN 2311 Intermediate Spanish
Prerequisite: SPAN 1312 or equivalent. The intermediate course leads to a greater facility in the spoken language and to more advanced reading skills. Three credit hours.(ACTS Course Number SPAN 2013)

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