Skip to the page content Skip to primary navigation Skip to the search form Skip to the audience-based navigation Skip to the site tools and log-in Information about website accessibility

Vocal Arts

Ein Deutsches Requiem

This page contains resources for choir members preparing for UALR’s Fall 2011 performance of Ein Deutsches Requiem by Johannes Brahms.  Below you will find links to our rehearsal notes for the semester, as well as to other resources online that you can use to learn the German pronunciation and practice your part between rehearsals.

Rehearsal Notes

Performance Week rehearsal handout:

October 27 and early November rehearsals: All movements covered!

October 6, 13, and 20: All movements covered!

September 29: (3) Herr, lehre doch mich; (6) Denn wir haben hie keine bleibende Statt

September 22: (2) Denn alles Fleisch est ist wie Gras; (3) Herr, lehre doch mich; (5) Ihr habt nun Traurigkeit

September 15: (1) Selig sind, die da Leid tragen; (4) Wie lieblich sind deine Wohnungen; (7) Selig sind die Toten

September 8: (4) Wie lieblich sind deine Wohnungen; (5) Ihr habt Traurigkeit; (6) Denn wir haben hie keine bleibende Statt; (7) Selig sind die Toten

September 1: (2) Denn alles Fleisch est ist wie Gras; (3) Herr, lehre doch mich; (6) Denn wir haben hie keine bleibende Statt

August 25: (1) Selig sint, die da Leid tragen; (6) Denn wir haben hie keine bleibende Statt

German pronunciation resources

Brahms Requiem — pronunciation guide and translation.pdf – This PDF file includes the German text sung by the chorus for each of the requiem’s movements.  Beneath each line of German text, there is a phonetic transcription for each word — and below that, an English translation.  This document was prepared by Roger Bryan of the Bingham and District Choral Society in England.

Ein Deutsches Requiem: Pronunciation audio files — This link takes you to a website with additional links you can click to hear the German text spoken (but not sung) aloud.  Please note that the speaker includes not just the chorus’s text, but the text for the soloists as well (so if you’re following along on the pronunciation PDF, the audio file will include text not printed on your page).  You may find it helpful to play part of a line, then pause the recording and practice saying that part yourself, then move to the next line, etc.  These files were prepared by Regine Hampel and Richard Seaton of the Open University Choir in England.

CyberBass midi audio files

Ein Deutsches Requiem: soprano, alto, tenor, bass, and tutti midis — This link takes you to a website with additional links you can click to hear the notes for your part.  Using the controls on the player, you can slow the audio to as much as 50% of performance speed so that you can more accurately hear each individual note.  The CyberBass site contains instructions for how to operate the player.  We have also provided some advice for how to use these audio files as a study tool elsewhere on this site: http://ualr.edu/music/voice/index.php/home/ensembles/community-chorus/using-cyberbass-midis-to-learn-your-part/.

Updated 9.24.2013