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University of Arkansas at Little Rock

Rights Icon Angela Davis to Speak at UALR

Angela Davis, an iconic figure in the social activist movement of the 1960s and 1970s, will speak Oct. 25 at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock.

Davis’ presentation will be at 6:30 p.m. in UALR’s University Theatre in the Center for Performing Arts. (See Directions and Parking)

Angela Davis to Speak at UALR Oct. 25, 2012Her lecture is sponsored by the UALR William G. Cooper Jr. Honors Program in English in association with the Institute on Race and Ethnicity and the Office of Campus Life.

The event is free and open to the public, but seating is limited. RSVP at Angela Davis Lecture or by phone at 501.569.8932.

Her lecture, “Race and Justice: The Consequences of Mass Incarceration,” is expected to focus on racial disparities and incarceration. Davis will conduct a book signing immediately following the lecture.

Davis, the author of nine books, has lectured throughout the United States as well as in Europe, Africa, Asia, Australia, and South America. In recent years, she has focused on the range of social problems associated with incarceration and the generalized criminalization of those communities most affected by poverty and racial discrimination.

She is currently a Distinguished Professor Emerita of History of Consciousness, an interdisciplinary Ph.D program, and of Feminist Studies at the University of California, Santa Cruz.

Davis has devoted her life to social justice and education. She is a champion for women’s rights and a founding member of Critical Resistance, a national organization dedicated to the dismantling of what it considers the prison industrial complex.

Her research interests include feminism, African American studies, critical theory, Marxism, popular music, social consciousness, and the philosophy and history of punishment and prisons.

She draws upon her own experiences in the early ’70s as a person who spent 18 months in jail and on trial after being placed on the FBI’s “Ten Most Wanted List.” During the social movement, then-Gov. Ronald Reagan banned Davis as a professor at the University of California system.

She has published a new collection of essays, “The Meaning of Freedom.” Her previously published books include “Abolition Democracy and Are Prisons Obsolete?” and a new edition of “Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass.”

For more information, contact the Institute on Race and Ethnicity at 501.569.8932.