Ed Anson – Manipulating the Word of God: The Use and Abuse of Greek Oracles

The polytheism associated with paganism made possible definitions of piety which would astound a monotheist. This is seen in what might be called the use and abuse of oracles. These physical sites where one might query a god were common throughout the Greek world, and thus “shopping around” for a favorable oracle was not uncommon, nor impious. This talk will look at this practice in general and concentrate on one of the most famous cases that of Alexander the Great and the Oracle of Zeus/Ammon in the Libyan desert.

Refreshments and an informal atmosphere encourage the interchange of ideas. Refreshments are served at 7 p.m., and the talk begins at 7:30 p.m.

Subscribers to the series help support historical research. See the History Institute’s website for subscription information.

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Dance Harvest 2017 — Sunday Performance

Featuring the choreographic vision of our highly regarded faculty, both past and present. Samantha Johnson and Rhythm McCarthy return as Guest Artists and join new faculty member Robin Neveu Brown, as well as Stephanie Thibeault and Stephen K. Stone, for a diverse concert that spans modern, jazz, and ballet styles.

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Dance Harvest 2017 — Thursday Performance

Opening night – Featuring the choreographic vision of our highly regarded faculty, both past and present. Samantha Johnson and Rhythm McCarthy return as Guest Artists and join new faculty member Robin Neveu Brown, as well as Stephanie Thibeault and Stephen K. Stone, for a diverse concert that spans modern, jazz, and ballet styles.

Ticket prices

Public $10
Faculty, Staff, Students  $5
Military and Seniors $5

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John Kirk – Sixtieth Anniversary Reflections on the 1957 Desegregation of Little Rock’s Central High School

Sixty years after the dramatic events surrounding the 1957 desegregation of Little Rock’s Central High School, which led to President Dwight D. Eisenhower deploying federal troops to ensure the safety of nine black students, this talk reflects on how historical and popular culture representations of events in Little Rock have located the school crisis within the context of the broader civil rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s. It examines how different approaches to the school crisis by historians from local, state, regional, national, and international perspectives have produced different understandings of the events that unfolded in the city. In many ways, the historiography of the 1957 Little Rock school crisis provides a microcosm of the wider trends that have shaped historical representations of the civil rights movement. The talk also explores how popular culture representations of the school crisis have influenced and shaped intellectual debate in a wide variety of media including theatre, film, essays, poetry and music.

Refreshments and an informal atmosphere encourage the interchange of ideas.  Refreshments are served at 7:00 p.m., and the talk begins at 7:30 p.m.

Subscribers to the series help support historical research. See the History Institute’s website for subscription information.

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Michael Warrick: Creating Youth

Recent sculpture by UA Little Rock Professor Michael Warrick

GALLERY HOURS

Monday – Friday, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Saturday, 10 a.m. – 1 p.m.
Sunday, 2 – 5 p.m.
Closed University Holidays

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Jess Porter – Know Your American Energy Booms: A Brief History of the 21st Century Shale Revolution

The United States is reprising its role as a global leader in hydrocarbon production as horizontal drilling and new methods of hydraulic fracturing have unleashed a torrent of American “tight” oil and natural gas on the global market. How does the “shale revolution” parallel or diverge from historic energy booms? This primer on recent energy development aims to provide the audience with a better understanding of the enabling technologies and the global impact of the shale revolution.

Refreshments and an informal atmosphere encourage the interchange of ideas. Refreshments are served at 7 p.m. and the talk begins at 7:30 p.m.

Subscribers to the series help support historical research. See the History Institute’s website for subscription information.

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