UALR partnership creates podcasts commemorating history of WWI in Arkansas

One of 13 newly released podcasts depicting life in Arkansas during World War I details the adventures of Doughboy Dunham Scott of Van Buren. Photo courtesy of Arkansas Historic Preservation Program.

The University of Arkansas at Little Rock School of Mass Communication is doing its part to preserve the history of life in Arkansas during World War I as part of the centennial celebration of what was once known as the Great War. 

The Arkansas World War I Centennial Commission has released 13 new podcasts about Arkansas during the first world war. The podcasts were created in partnership with the UALR School of Mass Communication, an effort led by Senior Instructor David Weekley and his student, Carly Garner.  

The UALR School of Mass Communication first partnered with the Arkansas Civil War Sesquicentennial Commission to create a series of 122 podcasts featuring 54 Civil War experts. UALR student engineers recorded the podcasts on a variety of Civil War topics in Arkansas. Arkansas teachers use the podcasts in their classrooms.

“Many of our students have gained valuable experience over the years doing the Civil War podcasts,” Weekley said. “It looks good on their resume, and it benefits educators across the state of Arkansas. We are thrilled to continue this relationship with the World War I project.”

Garner produced 13 podcasts during the fall 2016 semester. The project is expected to continue through fall 2018, with new podcasts being produced every semester.

The initial podcasts covered topics as diverse as the role of Arkansas women during the war, a picric acid plant in Little Rock, the influence of World War I on the Elaine Massacre, and the story of one Arkansas soldier during the war.

“As a collection, these snippets of Arkansas’s World War I story will provide a broad interpretation of the state’s role in the war both here and abroad that will be available for teachers, historians, and others interested in this crucial period in Arkansas and U.S. history,” said Mark Christ, community outreach director for the Arkansas Historic Preservation Program.

The new podcasts include:

  • Dr. Carl Carlson-Drexler of the Arkansas Archeological Survey discussing a WWI munitions plant in east Little Rock
  • Dr. Raymond Screws of the Arkansas National Guard Museum speaking about the building and evolution of the Camp Pike training ground
  • Elizabeth Hill of the Arkansas Women’s History Institute discussing the many ways that Arkansas women aided the war effort during the Great War
  • Grif Stockley, a Little Rock historian, covering the links between World War I and the 1919 Elaine race riots
  • Tom Wing of the Drennen-Scott Historic Site talking about the WWI adventures of Dunham Scott of Van Buren
  • Mark Christ of the Arkansas World War I Centennial Commemoration Committee talking about a controversy involving a pair of post-war commemorative sculptures.

For more information, visit the Arkansas World War I Centennial Commemoration Committee’s podcast page.

In the upper right photo, one of 13 newly released podcasts depicting life in Arkansas during World War I details the adventures of Doughboy Dunham Scott of Van Buren. Photo courtesy of Arkansas Historic Preservation Program.

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