Learning Shorts: Be ReASSUREd! Instructional Design for a New Age

According to Herlo (2013), “Instructional Design (ID) is concerned with factors that influence how well a person will be able to acquire, recall, and use new knowledge and skills” (p. 72). There are many ID Models – ADDIE, Dick & Carey, Merrill’s First Principles, Gagne’s Nine Events, Kirkpatrick’s Four Levels, etc. – that instructional designers and faculty members can choose from to use as “frameworks to organize and structure the process of creating instructional activities” (Herlo, 2013, p. 72) so that learners can successfully complete a course or training and demonstrate knowledge and skills.

Many ID Models primarily pertain to face-to-face classroom instruction; however, instructors are using educational technology and media to teach their classes. When considering eLearning and fully online programs, it is important to follow a model that allows for the incorporation and utilization of media and technology in the curriculum. The best model for this is the ASSURE Model.

A – Analyze learners -The first state is specific to understanding learners’ capabilities, previous knowledge, and learning styles. S – State standards & objectives — In the second stage, learners are presented with the expectations for successful outcomes. S – Select strategies, technology, media & materials — This third stage is where instructors can plan the learning content by selecting, modifying, and creating appropriate materials. U – Utilize technology, media & materials — During this fourth stage, instructors prepare the materials and learning environment as well as provide learning experiences. R – Require learner participation — Here, in the fifth stage, learners are able to engage with the content and their peers and practice what they have learned. E – Evaluate & revise — The sixth and final stage allows instructors to assess both learner progress and course effectiveness.The ASSURE Model is an acronym and comprises of six components. Elements of the ADDIE Model and Gagne’s Nine Events (Instructional Design Central, 2018) are evident when reviewing the ASSURE Model:

A – Analyze learners -The first state is specific to understanding learners’ capabilities, previous knowledge, and learning styles.

S – State standards & objectives — In the second stage, learners are presented with the expectations for successful outcomes.

S – Select strategies, technology, media & materials — This third stage is where instructors can plan the learning content by selecting, modifying, and creating appropriate materials.

U – Utilize technology, media & materials — During this fourth stage, instructors prepare the materials and learning environment as well as provide learning experiences.

R – Require learner participation — Here, in the fifth stage, learners are able to engage with the content and their peers and practice what they have learned.

E – Evaluate & revise — The sixth and final stage allows instructors to assess both learner progress and course effectiveness.

The ASSURE model can greatly aid instructional designers and faculty in the planning and delivery of online courses since it provides the best outline for classes involving technology and media. Sezer, B., Karaoglan Yilmaz, F. G., & Yilmaz, R. (2013) claim that the use of this instructional design model “can make instruction more effective, efficient, and relevant” (p. 136).

The utilization of technology and media in educational environments has changed from its introduction to the traditional classroom, and is continuously changing as education has shifted to include online learning. The ASSURE model can aid instructors and instructional designers to incorporate critical elements in lesson planning and implementation for optimum learning outcomes. To learn more about how to use the ASSURE model to design and deliver your online classes at UA Little Rock, REGISTER and join us for our next Learning Short session, Be ReASSUREd! presented by Cori Schmidtbauers, October 4th, 2019 at 11:30 am. Stop by the STaR Training Lab (Dickinson Hall Room 101) or join us online via STaR Trainings (Bb Collaborate).

For additional training and faculty development opportunities check out the STaR Training & Events Calendar.

References:
Herlo, D. (2013). Pass through examples of instructional design – I. Journal Plus Education / Educatia Plus, 9(1), 72-76.

Instructional Design Central. (2018). Instructional Design Models. Retrieved from: https://www.instructionaldesigncentral.com/instructionaldesignmodels

Sezer, B., Karaoglan Yilmaz, F. G., & Yilmaz, R. (2013). Integrating technology into classroom: The learner-centered instructional design. International Journal on New Trends in Education & Their Implications (IJONTE), 4(4), 134-144.

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