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Historic Arkansas Museum

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200 E. Third Street
Little Rock, AR 72201 United States
http://www.historicarkansas.org

October 2018

Truth and Deception in early Medieval Law

October 2, 2018 @ 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm
Historic Arkansas Museum, 200 E. Third Street
Little Rock, AR 72201 United States
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Evenings with History presented by Michael Heil Early medieval European legislators cared deeply about truth and worried about lying and its consequences. Perjury, according to a capitulary of Charlemagne, was “the worst crime,” while compilers of religious law warned that, in the words of the Book of Wisdom, “a lying mouth destroys the soul.” Yet deception was rampant, at the highest levels of society. A majority of early medieval charters have been deemed forged or interpolated, and bogus legal texts such as supposed papal…

November 2018

From “the Inevitable Cabbage” to “American Vegetables,” or How Rural European Women Became Urban American Housewives

November 5, 2018 @ 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm
Historic Arkansas Museum, 200 E. Third Street
Little Rock, AR 72201 United States
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Evenings with History presented by Marta Cieslak Between the 1870s and 1914, over eighteen million Europeans arrived in the United States. Most of them came from rural areas and settled in rapidly growing American cities where they faced multiple challenges of the urban life. This talk examines the unique transatlantic experience of rural women migrants from East-Central Europe. It explores what kind of lives they left behind in their European villages and what kind of lives they built in their…

February 2019

When the Depths Don’t give up their Dead: Exploring New Primary sources about the Elaine Race Massacre

February 5, 2019 @ 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm
Historic Arkansas Museum, 200 E. Third Street
Little Rock, AR 72201 United States
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Evenings with History presented by Brian K. Mitchell What is known as the Elaine Massacre began on September 30, 1919, and continued until the arrival of federal troops in Phillips County on October 2. In those days several hundred African Americans were murdered. Subsequent trials of black workers saw the conviction of many others on charges from murder to night riding. This talk examines newly discovered primary sources and discusses how these new sources are reshaping the existing narrative.

March 2019

Defining the American Empire

March 5, 2019 @ 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm
Historic Arkansas Museum, 200 E. Third Street
Little Rock, AR 72201 United States
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Evenings with History presented by Charles Romney Scholars struggle to locate the right analytical framework to understand the expansion of the United States. Is the American empire similar to the British empire in its features, or is the acquisition of territory by the United States distinct from European imperialism because of America’s republican ideology? This talk will explain traditional approaches to defining the American empire before exploring more recent interpretations that stress the unusual—and possibly unique—history of zones controlled by the…

April 2019

The End of Reconstruction and the Long-term Cost of Conservative Redemption

April 2, 2019 @ 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm
Historic Arkansas Museum, 200 E. Third Street
Little Rock, AR 72201 United States
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Evenings with History presented by Carl Moneyhon Progressive and bi-racial governments created following Congressional intervention in the Reconstruction of the South in 1867 all came to end in the period 1870 to 1875. This talk examines how Conservative and Democratic opponents of these governments used a variety of tactics that included violence, appeals to racial hatred, and charges of government corruption to achieve this end. It also considers the long-term social and economic impact of such tactics on the history…

October 2019

Katrina Yeaw: “Beyond Benghazi: A Brief History of Modern Libya”

October 1, 2019 @ 7:00 pm - 8:30 pm
Historic Arkansas Museum, 200 E. Third Street
Little Rock, AR 72201 United States
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In September 2012, members of the Islamic militant group Ansar al-Sharia, carried out coordinated attacks against the American diplomatic compound and another government facility in Benghazi, Libya, resulting in the deaths of four Americans. This tragedy has become central to American understanding of contemporary Libya as well as debates in American politics, resulting in 10 investigations. Going beyond these events, this talk will offer an overview of modern Libyan history with particular emphasis on the colonial period, the founding of…

November 2019

Kelly Houston Jones: “Absentee Plantations in the Mississippi Valley”

November 5, 2019 @ 7:00 pm - 8:00 pm
Historic Arkansas Museum, 200 E. Third Street
Little Rock, AR 72201 United States
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Throughout the Mississippi Valley, including Arkansas, the actual owners of many plantations did not live on-site. This talk examines these operations, asking questions about their management and similarity to absentee-owned plantations in the Caribbean. Perhaps most important, what was life like for enslaved people on places with no white family in the “big house”? Evenings with History, Sponsored by the University History Institute and the Department of History. For more information visit ualr.edu/history/history-institute

December 2019

Andrew Amstutz: “A (Publishing) House Divided: The End of Empire and the Partition of India and Pakistan”

December 3, 2019 @ 7:00 pm - 8:30 pm
Historic Arkansas Museum, 200 E. Third Street
Little Rock, AR 72201 United States
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Free

When the British empire in India ended in 1947, the Indian subcontinent was violently divided into the independent nation-states of India and Pakistan. During the Partition of India, at least fourteen million people were displaced across the new international border between India and Pakistan. The Partition of India was one of the largest moments of mass violence after World War II, yet the governments of India and Pakistan have done little to commemorate Partition and its victims. In contrast, individual…

February 2020

John Kirk: “What is the Civil Rights Movement?”

February 4 @ 7:00 pm
Historic Arkansas Museum, 200 E. Third Street
Little Rock, AR 72201 United States
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To mark the publication of his ninth book, The Civil Rights Movement: A Documentary Reader (New York and London: Wiley, 2019), Kirk reflects on the ways in which historians’ approaches to and understandings of the civil rights movement have changed since the 1960s. Initially focusing on the 1950s and 1960s, and on the leadership of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., civil rights studies have expanded chronologically and thematically to paint a very different picture of a black struggle for freedom and equality.…

March 2020

David Baylis: “Where the Sidewalk Never Begins: Race, Class, Accessibility, and Wellness in Little Rock, AR”

March 10 @ 7:00 pm
Historic Arkansas Museum, 200 E. Third Street
Little Rock, AR 72201 United States
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In some circles, questions of accessibility hardly come up. If they do, they tend to be discussed with respect to leisure or convenience (e.g. “wouldn’t it be nice if we could stroll down the block to get a cup of coffee?”). For others, however, accessibility is a matter of well-being and perhaps even survival (e.g. “how will I get to work today?” or “where can my children go to play outside?”). While there are many ways to approach the topic…

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