Applied Science

Admission Requirements | Program Requirements | Graduate Courses

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The Applied Sciences (ASCI) graduate programs are housed in the College of Arts, Letters, and Sciences (CALS). The programs offer applied research in a broad set of emphasis areas, including applied chemistry, applied biosciences, applied physics, materials, nanotechnology, computational science, applied mathematics, and environmental science.

The Applied Science department offers two degrees, the Doctor of Philosophy and the Master of Science. Each degree has multiple emphases. Faculty housed in other departments in both the CALS and the Donaghey College of Engineering and Information Technology (EIT) participate in the emphasis tracks. For more information and access to the online application process, visit the Applied Science website.


Master of Science in Applied Science

The Master of Science degree is an interdisciplinary program designed to advance a student’s knowledge beyond the baccalaureate degree and to teach the student how to approach a research project. Students may either pursue a generic applied science master’s degree or, with sufficient specialized course work, may earn a master’s degree in applied physics.

The degree is designed for students with a wide variety of research and/or curricular interests in science and engineering. The thesis option includes a proposal defense and a thesis defense, and provides the student with an opportunity to carry out thesis-based research. The non-thesis option includes a comprehensive exam and a project. The student choosing the non-thesis option will have three different alternatives to satisfy the comprehensive exam and project requirement. These alternatives are intended to cater to students who

  1. are in the Applied Science (ASCI) Ph.D. program and want to acquire the ASCI M.S. degree since they satisfy a majority of the cognate requirements, or
  2. want to complete some of the requirements of the ASCI Ph.D. as a precursor to applying for admission to the Ph.D. program, or
  3. want to complete a predominately course based master’s degree. The details of the programs are given below.

Admissions Requirements

  • Applicants must possess a baccalaureate degree in an appropriate scientific discipline, such as chemistry, physics, biology, material science, mathematics, statistics, or earth science.
  • They must have an overall undergraduate GPA of 3.0.
  • On the GRE, applicants must have a minimum quantitative score of 151 and verbal score of at least 138, and a 4.0 on the writing assessment portion (or combined 1,000 in the older GRE scoring system with a minimum score of 650 on the quantitative portion).
  • With the approval of the graduate coordinator, applicants with a 3.5 GPA or greater on their last 60 hours of graduate and undergraduate coursework may not be required to take the GRE.
  • Applicants must possess the requisites for their intended area of study.
  • International Students: International students whose native language is not English and who do not have a degree from a regionally accredited U.S. institution of higher education must also submit a score of at least 79 on the internet-based Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) exam, or a 550 on the paper-based test, or 213 on the computer-based version. In order to qualify for a teaching assistantship, students whose native language is not English must score a 5.0 on the Test of Spoken English (TSE).

Conditional Admission

In certain cases, students not meeting these requirements may be admitted on a conditional basis. The conditional student must maintain a minimum GPA of 3.0 in at least nine CALS or EIT graduate credits in the first year of study to be fully admitted.

Recommendations on a graduate application for admission to Applied Science’s Master of Science program are made by the Applied Science graduate coordinator with input provided by the relevant Applied Science doctoral faculty. Satisfying minimum requirements for admission by itself does not guarantee admission. Other factors that could be involved include but are not limited to the availability of funding and appropriate faculty mentors.


Program Requirements

Course Work

The master of science degree requires a minimum of 30 credit hours beyond the baccalaureate degree. The student’s plan of study must be developed in conjunction with the thesis advisor/project instructor and the Student Advisory Committee.

If a student receives one C in his/her course work, he/she will be warned that his/her academic performance is unacceptable and that his/her status will be reviewed by the relevant Applied Science doctoral faculty, who will suggest corrective action. A student receiving two Cs or either a D or an F in his/her course work will be dismissed from the program, pending review by the Applied Science faculty.

Emphasis in Applied Physics

To earn an emphasis in applied physics, students must take at least nine credit hours from recognized physics courses recognized by the Applied Science department.

Transfer of Credit

A maximum of six credit hours may be transferred from an accredited graduate program. The graduate coordinator will determine applicability of the transfer.

Student Advisory Committee

The Student Advisory Committee will be composed of four members, including the committee chair, who will be the thesis advisor/project instructor. The chair and two of the three members must be faculty members from CALS. The at-large member can be any other UALR graduate faculty or Applied Science adjunct faculty. The Applied Science faculty must approve the committee constituency.

Thesis Option

The thesis subject is selected by the student and the Student Advisory Committee at least one year prior to the oral defense. The written thesis format must follow the UALR Graduate School’s Dissertation and Thesis Guidelines found on the Graduate School website.

Thesis Proposal

At least one year prior to the thesis defense, the candidate must present a proposal for his/her thesis work to the advisory committee.

Thesis Defense

Students will present and orally defend their completed master’s research before their advisory committees. The defenses will be open to the public and must be announced at least two weeks in advance.

Non-Thesis Option

Comprehensive Exams

After the candidate has completed eighteen credit hours of graded course work, the candidate may attempt the comprehensive exams. The comprehensive exam requirement must be passed in no more than two attempts.

The second attempt has to be in the semester immediately following the semester in which the first attempt was made. The student may opt for either of the two options listed below to satisfy the comprehensive exam requirement, but must get prior written approval from their Student Advisory Committee for their choice. These options are:

  • The student may take an oral exam administered by his/her student advisory committee, or
  • The student may take the Doctoral Candidacy Exams. If a student chooses this option, he/she must pass the exams in the three candidacy subjects within the same emphasis area. The student may test only in those candidacy subjects, which he/she has taken as part of the eighteen credit hours of graded course work mentioned above. The Doctoral Candidacy Exam rules will be invoked to determine whether the student has passed or failed.

Project Presentation and Report

The student must complete a project, by means of six credits of Independent Study (ASCI 7X89) with the project instructor as the instructor of record. Prior to undertaking the Independent Study courses, the student must present a project plan to the Student Advisory Committee. Upon completion of the Independent Study courses, the student must orally present his/her work to the Student Advisory Committee, and deliver a written project report, in the format specified by the project instructor, to the Student Advisory Committee for approval, for which at least two-thirds of the committee members will have to vote in favor of that outcome for it to be approved.

Successful defense of the doctoral proposal and acceptance of a peer-reviewed written document on some completed portion of a project, such as a conference paper or a journal article, with the student as the primary or corresponding author, may serve in lieu of the project presentation and report, with prior written approval from the Student Advisory Committee.


Credit Requirements

The master of science degree requires a minimum of 30 credit hours beyond the baccalaureate degree.


Course Credits

A minimum of 18 credit hours in 5000 or 7000 level graded courses within CALS or EIT must be taken. A grade of B or greater must be obtained in each course to count towards the minimum course requirement. A maximum of six credit hours of independent study (ASCI 7X89) or special topics (5399, 7399) may be applied to the master of science with the following exceptions. Those students who are required to use six hours of independent study (ASCI 7X89) to complete a project under the non-thesis option may apply three additional credits of independent study (ASCI 7389) or special topics (5399, 7399) to the master of science.


Thesis/Dissertation or Project Credits

Either a minimum of twelve credit hours of master’s thesis (ASCI 8X00) or a minimum of twelve credits of research/dissertation (ASCI 9X00) or a minimum of six credits of Independent Study (ASCI 7X89) are required.


Graduation Requirements

  • Successful completion of an approved program of study with a minimum GPA of 3.0
  • Successful completion of the writing requirements

Thesis Option

  • Successful completion of thesis proposal
  • Successful completion of thesis defense
  • Submission of an acceptable thesis to Graduate School

Non-Thesis Option

  • Successful completion of Comprehensive Exam
  • Successful completion of Project Presentation and Report
Requirement M.S. Thesis Option M.S. Non-Thesis Option Alternative 1 M.S. Non-Thesis Option Alternative 2 M.S. Non-Thesis Option Alternative 3

Minimum Graded Course Credits

18 credits

A maximum of six independent study (ASCI 7X89) and/or special topics course (5399, 7399) may be applied towards the M.S. requirement.

18 credits-A maximum of six independent study (ASCI 7X89) and/or special topics (5399, 7399) may be applied towards the M.S. requirement.

18 credits-A maximum of three independent study (ASCI 7X89) or special topics (5399, 7399) in addition to the six credits of independent study (ASCI 7X89) credits required for project (see second row and last row) may be applied towards the M.S. requirement.

18 credits-A maximum of three independent study (ASCI 7X89) or special topics credits (5399, 7399) in addition to the six credits of independent study (ASCI 7X89) credits required for project (see second row and last row) may be applied towards the M.S. requirement.

Thesis/Dissertation or Project Credits

12 master’s credits (ASCI 8X00)

12 Doctoral credits (9X00)

Six credits of independent study (ASCI 7X89) for project (see below)

Six credits of independent study (ASCI 7X89) for project (see below)

Thesis Proposal and Defense

Required

Not applicable

Not applicable

Not applicable

Comprehensive Exam

Not applicable

Must pass three candidacy subjects in doctoral candidacy exam

Must pass three candidacy subjects in doctoral candidacy exam

Oral exam administered by student’s advisory committee

Project Presentation and Report

Not applicable

Successful defense of the doctoral proposal.

Published conference paper or journal; student as primary or corresponding author

Complete project by means of six credits of independent study (ASCI 7X89), make project presentation and submit report.

Complete project by means of six credits of independent study (ASCI 7X89), make project presentation and submit report.


Doctor of Philosophy in Applied Science

Faculty participating in the doctoral program are drawn mainly from the Departments of Biology, Chemistry, Earth Science, Mathematics and Statistics, and Physics and Astronomy.

The Doctor of Philosophy in Applied Science is awarded upon completion of a program of advanced study including a significant original dissertation in applied research or design. Work accomplished without the supervision of an Applied Science doctoral faculty member will not be accepted in lieu of the dissertation requirements. The research must be relevant to the emphasis area in which the student is pursuing a degree.

All emphases have similar program requirements. Each emphasis has its own candidacy exams, seminar requirement, and specific course requirements, which are described under the Program Requirements for the Doctor of Philosophy.

The following emphasis areas are offered:

Applied Biosciences

The applied biosciences emphasis is a research-oriented academic course of study that encompasses the broad fields of biotechnology and applied biological sciences. Research areas include molecular and cellular biology, phylogeny, evolutionary ecology, genomics, and bioinformatics. ASCI 7192 Biosciences and Bioinformatics Seminar is required each semester the student is enrolled.

Applied Chemistry

The Ph.D. emphasis in applied chemistry provides advanced preparation for careers in government, industrial, and academic research. The curriculum is a blend of traditional and non-traditional, innovative courses that reflect the needs of modern chemistry. The UALR Department of Chemistry has research-quality instrumentation and computer facilities, gives individual attention to each student, and offers high-quality instruction.

Applied Physics

The applied physics doctoral emphasis is designed to prepare students in cutting-edge research areas in Applied Physics, Materials, Earth Sciences, Astronomy, and Astrophysics that include advanced materials, nanotechnology, photovoltaic devices, applied geophysics, seismology, dark matter and galaxies.

Computational Science

The computational science emphasis applies to mathematical modeling, simulation and visualization, and high performance computing to specific scientific disciplines. Admission to the computational science emphasis areas requires knowledge of discrete mathematics, differential and integrated calculus for single and multi-variable functions, linear algebra, differential equations, mathematical statistics, and programming through data structures.


Graduate Assistantships

Graduate assistantships that support teaching and research opportunities are available to qualified full time students. Tuition is paid for ninecredits, and a stipend is provided for living expenses. Students must pay registration fees, buy textbooks, and purchase any necessary support materials. For more information about graduate assistantships, the online application process, and other financial assistance opportunities, visit the Applied Science website. A student supported by a graduate assistantship shall be registered as a full-time student.


Admission Requirements

  • Applicants must possess a baccalaureate degree in an appropriate scientific discipline such as chemistry, physics, materials science, biology, mathematics, statistics, or earth science.
  • They must have a minimum overall GPA of 3.0 in the graduate and undergraduate credit hours.
  • On the GRE, applicants must have a minimum quantitative score of 155, verbal score of at least 138, and writing assessment score of at least 4.5 (or combined 1,000 in the older GRE scoring system with a minimum score of 700 on the quantitative portion).
  • With the approval of the graduate coordinator, applicants with a 3.5 GPA or greater on their last 60 of graduate and undergraduate credit hours, may not be required to take the GRE.
  • Applicants must possess the prerequisites for their intended areas of study.

Recommendations on a doctoral application for admission to the Applied Science program are made with the collective input of the Applied Science Doctoral faculty. Satisfying minimum requirements for admission by itself does not guarantee admission. Factors that could be involved include, but are not limited to, availability of faculty mentors and financial support in cases where such support is sought by an applicant.

International Students

International students whose native language is not English and who do not have a degree from a regionally accredited U.S. institution of higher education must also submit a score of at least 79 on internet based Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) exam or 550 on the paper based or 213 on the computer-based versions. In order to qualify for a teaching assistantship, students whose native language is not English must score a 5.0 on the Test of Spoken English (TSE).

Conditional Admission

In certain cases, students not meeting these requirements may be admitted on a conditional basis. The conditional student must maintain a minimum GPA of 3.0 in at least nine CALS or EIT graduate credits in the first year of study to be fully admitted.


Program Requirements

Writing Requirement

An English Writing Proficiency Exam (WPE) will be offered each spring term by the Applied Science program. This exam will assess the student’s ability to communicate in a written format. Each student must pass this exam to fulfill graduation requirements. A student who does not pass the WPE is required to take English Writing Proficiency Laboratory (EWPL). The EWPL is offered each Spring term. The student must take the EWPL each spring term until he/she passes.

Seminar and Research Ethic Course Requirement

All Ph.D. students are required to register for the Applied Sciences Seminar (ASCI 7190) each semester of residency. Students in the Applied Biosciences emphasis area may choose to register for Applied Bioscience Seminar (ASCI 7192) instead of ASCI 7190.

All Applied Science doctoral students are required to register for and successfully complete the Research Ethics course (ASCI 7118) in any one semester prior to graduating from the program. A student registered for Research Ethics course can be exempt from registering for Applied Science Seminar or Applied Bioscience Seminar for that semester upon the approval the graduate coordinator.

A maximum of one credit hour of seminar (or Research Ethics) hour per semester can be counted towards the credit requirements of the Applied Science PhD.

Laboratory Rotations

All Applied Science doctoral students must register for Introduction to Research in Applied Science (ASCI 7×45), also called “Laboratory Rotation,” in their first semester in the program; they must receive a “satisfactory” grade at the end of the rotation. Rotations can be performed with any Applied Science doctoral faculty member. Students can receive from one to three credit hours for their rotations by registering for ASCI 7145, 7245, or 7345. At the end of the rotation, the student and the rotation host should meet and discuss the progress of the rotation. The student should present the results, either orally or in the form of a written report, to the rotation host.

Students also need to submit a written report to the coordinator of laboratory rotation. If the student has not selected his/her dissertation advisor after the first semester of rotations, the student will be required to register again for ASCI 7×45. Failure to perform adequately in the laboratory rotation may result in termination of state assistantship funding.

A maximum of two credit hours of Laboratory Rotation can be counted towards the credit requirements of Applied Science PhD.

Doctor of Philosophy Graded Program Requirements

All emphases require a minimum of 72 credit hours beyond the baccalaureate degree. Specific requirements depend on the emphasis area chosen and are detailed in those sections. The student’s plan of study must be developed in conjunction with his/her doctoral advisor and advisory committee.

  • A minimum of eighteen (18) credit hours of course work is required from 5000- and 7000-level courses in CALS and EIT. The Introduction to Research course, ASCI 7145, ASCI 7245, or ASCI 7345, must be taken, and a grade of “credit” must be obtained.
  • A minimum of 42 credit hours in the 9000-level doctoral research/dissertation is required. The research must be substantial and must extend the state of the art in the student’s chosen field through theoretical development, design or process improvement, or experimental technique.

If a student receives one C in his/her course work, he/she will be warned that his/her academic performance is unacceptable and that his/her status will be reviewed by the Applied Science Doctoral Affairs Committee (ASDAC), which will suggest corrective action. A student receiving two Cs or either a D or an F in his/her course work will be dismissed from the program, pending review by ASDAC.


Transfer of Credit

A maximum of six credit hours may be transferred from an accredited graduate program. Transferability of credit is determined by the student’s advisory committee based upon the applicability of the course to dissertation work and the student’s educational goals.

Candidacy Exam

The purpose of the candidacy examination is to determine whether the applicant possesses the attributes of a doctoral candidate. The candidacy exam will be held twice a year after the start of fall and spring classes. The candidacy exam is a comprehensive, written test composed of four subject tests, each of which must be passed. The student will be tested on topics selected from the candidacy subject list in his/her emphasis area. The student may attempt the candidacy exam a maximum of two times and must attempt it in consecutive semesters. A student who has not passed all exams after the second offering will be dismissed from the program.

Students must attempt the exam no sooner than the beginning of the second semester in the program. A student must take the exam at the next opportunity after completion of the core in his/her area and, in any event, no later than the beginning of his/her fifth semester in the program. A minimum GPA of 3.0 in graduate course work is required to take the examination.

Candidacy Subjects

 

Applied Biosciences

Organism Functions

Cellular Function

Genetics

Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

Biological Modeling and Analysis

Ecological Interaction

Discipline Specific Applications

 

Applied Physics

Mechanics

Electricity and Magnetism

Quantum Mechanics

Statistical Thermodynamics

Elastic Wave Theory

Potential Theory

Material Physics

Astrophysics

Discipline Specific Applications

 

Applied Chemistry

Analytical Chemistry

Inorganic Chemistry

Organic Chemistry

Physical Chemistry

Discipline Specific Applications

 

Computational Science

High Performance Computing

Applied Mathematics

Modeling and Visualization

Discipline Specific Applications

Doctoral Advisor

A student’s dissertation advisor must be a doctoral faculty member (approved by ASDAC) participating in the Applied Science graduate program. Those students who do not have a doctoral advisor by the end of the third semester may be dismissed. Changing doctoral advisors after this point is possible, and sometimes advisable, but it usually slows a student’s completion of degree requirements. Therefore, this decision should be approached carefully.

Doctoral Advisory Committee

The student’s doctoral advisory committee will be composed of five members, including the student’s doctoral advisor who will serve as the committee chair. Four of the five members including the chair must be Applied Science doctoral faculty members. The at-large member(s) may be any other person who has graduate faculty status at UALR. This also includes full-time research faculty with graduate faculty status. However, postdoctoral researchers can only serve as one of the external members of a dissertation committee. The ASDAC must approve the committee constituency. When a student proposes his/her dissertation committee to ASDAC, he/she also needs to provide a brief written justification explaining the role of each member in contribution to the student’s dissertation research. Students are encouraged to form their advisory committee with a majority of faculty members from his/her respective emphasis area. Dissertation committees cannot be changed after the proposal defense unless the student has a compelling or extraordinary reason (e.g., leaving or retirement of a committee member).

The dissertation subject is selected by the student and the advisory committee at least two years prior to the oral defense of the research. It must be a scholarly contribution to a major field of applied science in the student’s emphasis area. The written dissertation format must follow the UALR Graduate School’s Dissertation and Thesis Guidelines found on the Graduate School website.

Dissertation Proposal

At least two years prior to the dissertation defense, candidate must present a written proposal in either a National Institutes of Health (NIH) or National Science Foundation (NSF) grant proposal format for his/her dissertation work to the advisory committee. The written proposal should be given to the advisory committee at least two weeks in advance of meeting with the committee.

Dissertation Defense

Students will orally defend their dissertation research before their advisory committee. Dissertation should be given to the advisory committee at least two weeks in advance of meeting with the committee. The defense will be open to the public and must be announced at least two weeks in advance.


Graduation Requirements

  • Successful completion of minimum credit requirements
  • Successful completion of an approved program of study with a minimum GPA of 3.0
  • Successful completion of candidacy examinations
  • Successful completion of proposal and oral defense
  • Successful completion of dissertation and oral defense
  • Successful completion of the writing, research ethics course, laboratory rotation, and seminar requirements

Courses Used in Applied Science Emphases

A list of courses in applied science (ASCI) with descriptions is provided on the following pages. Additional courses offered within the participating departments can be found under the “Master of Science in Biology,” the “Master of Science and Master of Arts in Chemistry,” the “Master of Science in Computer Science,” the “Master of Science in Information Quality,” and the “Non-program Courses” sections of this catalog.

Students admitted to the UALR Graduate School but not the applied science program must have the instructor’s consent to take any applied science (ASCI) course.


Courses in Applied Science

ASCI 5310 Introduction to Signal Processing
Prerequisite: MATH 3322 or equivalent. Introduction to the fundamental concepts in signal processing. Use of the fundamental transform techniques (Laplace transform, discrete Fourier transform, z-transform). Discrete time representation of signals, linear time invariant systems. Correlation, coherence, and time delays. Standard system models (ARMA, ARMAX). FIR and IIR filters. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

ASCI 5315 Advanced Dynamics I
Prerequisite: MATH 2453. Kinematics of translating and rotating vectors. Dynamics of systems of particles and rigid bodies. Angular momentum. Newtonian mechanics. Lagrangian mechanics. Examples drawn from the fields of robotics, vehicle motion, and planetary motion. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours.

ASCI 5355 Elastic Wave Theory
Prerequisites: MATH 1451, MATH 1452, MATH 2453 and MATH 3322. Elasticity theory developed as a basic necessity to the theory of seismology. Analysis of stress and infinitesimal strain. Perfect elasticity. Equation of motion in term of displacement. Vibration and waves. Theories of body and surface waves. Ray theory and energy partition.

ASCI 5360 Potential Theory
Prerequisites: MATH 1451, MATH 1452, MATH 2453, and MATH 3322. Solution to Laplace’s equation using different boundary and initial conditions. One-, two- and three-dimensional equations will be analyzed. Various coordinate systems (rectangular, cylindrical, and spherical) will be used in the solution of the Laplace function, the Associate Legendre function, and orthogonality of the Legendre function.

ASCI 7118 Research Ethics in Science and Eng.
The course uses a case-based method to cover various topics related to professional research ethics. It is intended for entering science and engineering graduate students in the Donaghey College of Engineering and Information Technology (DCEIT). The purpose of the course is to familiarize students with professional ethics related to research and to prepare them to deal with typical ethical situations that may occur in the course of their graduate studies and professional careers.

ASCI 7145, 7245, 7345 Introduction to Research in Applied Science
First semester orientation course to allow new students in the applied science doctoral program to work in a number of faculty research areas. This course will aid the student in the selection of his/her doctoral research director. Variable credit of one to three hours. Offered on demand.

ASCI 7189, 7289, 7389 Research in Instrumentation
Design, research in basic, applied instrumentation; requires laboratory research project involving instrumentation characterization or development. F, S.

ASCI 7190 Applied Science Seminar
Prerequisites: graduate standing, consent of thesis advisor and graduate coordinator. Students, faculty, and invited speakers will present, discuss, and exchange ideas on research topics of general interest. Credit must be received at least one semester before enrollment in the last research semester. One hour session per week. Course may not be repeated for credit. Graded: credit/no credit.

ASCI 7191, 7291, 7391 Cooperative Education in Applied Science
Prerequisite: full-time attendance for one semester in the applied science program with a GPA of 3.00 or better and the approval of the major professor and the graduate coordinator. Complements the classroom experience by allowing the student to apply the concepts of instrumentation in the work place. Minimum of one 10 week summer term. Written report, minimum of 200 hours work per credit hour are required. The exact number of hours and the nature and responsibilities of the work will be specified in writing by the student, the sponsoring faculty member, and the employer. The course may be repeated for credit. The course cannot be used for credit toward the requirements for an applied science degree.

ASCI 7192 Biosciences and Bioinformatics Seminar
Prerequisites: graduate standing, consent of thesis advisor and graduate coordinator. Students, faculty, and invited speakers will present, discuss, and exchange ideas on research topics of general interest in the field of Biotechnology. One hour session per week. Course may be repeated for credit. Graded: credit/no credit. Cross-listed with BINF 7192.

ASCI 7295 Practical Topics in Science Management
A survey of practical topics relevant to practicing scientist and engineers such as ethics, project management, and grant writing. While an emphasis is placed on bioinformatics, topics will be if interest to all participating in science and engineering projects. Two credit hours. Cross-listed with BINF 7295.

ASCI 7307 Smart Materials
Prerequisite: ASCI 4320 or equivalent. This course will deal with the unique nonlinear, hysteretic response of smart materials that arise due to coupling between mechanical and thermal or electric or magnetic fields. Specifically, microstructural characteristics and constitutive modeling of shape memory alloys, ferroelectric materials and ferromagnetic materials will be covered. Use of these smart materials in sensor and actuator design will be addressed.

ASCI 7317 Nano-structural Materials: Physical and Chemical Properties
Prerequisites: SYEN 3372 or PHYS 4340 or CHEM 4340 or equivalent. This course introduces students to the area of nanotechnology and the novel properties of the materials built at the nanoscale. The course will cover the main properties of nano-materials, various methods for synthesis and characterization and the most up-to-date applications from nano-electronics, advanced materials, bio-medicine, etc. The course is designed for graduate students with a background in chemistry, physics, and engineering.ASCI 7318 Micro- and Nano-Fabrication

ASCI 7318 Micro- and Nano-Fabrication
Prerequisites: consent of instructor. This course will introduce some of the important micro- and nano-fabrication techniques that are mostly used in the areas of microelectronics and nanotechnology. Some of the topics that will be covered include diffusion of impurities, thermal oxidation, ion implantation, optical lithography, thin film deposition, etching, nano-lithography, nano-imprinting, growth of nano-rods and nano-springs by glancing angle deposition, and growth of carbon nano-tubes. During the course, students will become familiar with some of the basic experiments including thin film and glancing angle depositions, etching, and film characterization techniques. The course is intended for graduate students from science and engineering majors.

ASCI 7340 Applied Instrumental Optics
Fundamental concepts in design and implementation of optical principles in analytical instrumentation; solving optics engineering problems; includes electromagnetic wave analysis, reflection and refraction, interference and diffraction, optical waveguides, Fourier analysis, coherence and holography. On demand.

ASCI 7341 Electro-Optics Instrumentation
Prerequisite: Applied Science 7340 or equivalent. Physical principles and operating characteristics of electro-optical devices and systems; gas, chemical, solid state and semiconductor lasers; Gaussian beam optics, laser modulators and scanners; imaging devices; thermal and photon detectors; fiber and integrated optics; nonlinear optical devices. Offered on demand.

ASCI 7344 Plant Hormonal Biology
This class will provide fundamental knowledge about major classes of phytohormones (auxins ABA, ethylene, gibberellins, cytokinins) as well as new plant hormones such as brassinosteroid strigolactones jasmonates. The structure and function of the all classes of plant hormones will be discussed in some detail and the interactions and crosstalks between different phytohormones will be highlighted. Special attention will be given to regulation of biosynthesis of phytohormones for biotechnological applications and agriculture.

ASCI 7355 Introduction to Geophysics
Prerequisite: MATH 1451. Application of geology and geophysics to study the interior of the earth and the development of its surface features.

ASCI 7365 Advanced Seismology
Prerequisite: MATH 3322. Analysis of seismic waves in a uniform medium from a pressure pulse in a spherical cavity. Solution to Sharpe’s problem using Laplace Transform. Wave propagation from sources in layered medium of different physical conditions. Numerical integration of equation of motion. Seismometry. Foca mechanism and source characteristics. Internal structure of the earth. Nuclear testing and other explosions. Offered in spring.

ASCI 7375 Biochemistry of Biological Molecules
Prerequisites: introductory biochemistry course or permission of the instructor. Three five-week modules providing a critical introduction into the structure and biological functions of nucleic acids, proteins and membranes. Topics in the first section, nucleic acids, include structure-function relationships among DNA, RNA, and proteins during replication, transcription and translation. Topics in the second section, proteins, include the principles of protein folding, function, purification and enzyme kinetics. Topics in the third section, membranes, include mobility of membrane constituents, properties of membrane proteins, mechanisms of membrane transport, membrane synthesis and flow, secretion, receptors and signal transduction.

ASCI 7380 Biomedical Instrumentation
Principles of biomedical instrumentation; special constraints in safety, signal transduction, signal-to-noise ratio; special problems in medical instrument design; includes Food and Drug Administration regulations, electrical processing, data acquisition; medical instrument design case studies; emphasis on theory, common difficulties, present research directions of bio-instrumentation design; requires laboratory assignments, major laboratory project. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours. Offered on demand.

ASCI 7381 Physiological Measurement Techniques
Principles, physiology, physics, instrumentation of modern physiological measurements; includes measurements of electrocardiogram, pulmonary function, metabolic rate, blood flow, human performance; ultrasonic imaging, stress tests, impedance cardiology; emphasis on theory of each technique’s measurement difficulties, present research directions; requires proposal of a technique that overcomes some disadvantages of existing methods. Three hours lecture. Three credit hours. Offered on demand.

ASCI 7385 Concepts in Genetic Analysis
Prerequisites: introductory undergraduate genetics or molecular biology course. Methods of genetic analysis including mutant isolation, genetic and physical mapping, receptors genetics, evolutionary mechanisms, molecular variation, and genomic evolution.

ASCI 7399 Special Topics in Applied Science
Detailed study in applied science and related areas; may be lecture or lecture and laboratory, depending on specific topics. Variable credit of one to three hours. Offered on demand.

ASCI 7405 Principles of Analytical Instrumentation
Modern analytical instrumentation; physical, chemical basis for measurements; basic signal processing; basic optics; includes specific instrumentation, methods for ultraviolet-visible and infrared spectrophotometry, atomic and mass spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance, x-ray methods, analytical separations.

ASCI 7451 Introduction to Air Contamination Evaluation
Generation, propagation, measurement, evaluation of air contaminants (including aerosols, gases, vapors); principles of sample collection and analysis, direct measurement, statistical analysis and interpretation of results; applications include monitoring and modeling of industrial, community, transportation, indoor environments and sources.

ASCI 8100 – 8600 Master’s Thesis
Prerequisites: consent of advisor.

ASCI 9100 – 9600 Doctoral Research/Dissertation
Prerequisites: consent of advisor. One to nine credit hours to be determined at the time of registration.

ASCI 9700 – 9900 Doctoral Research/Dissertation
Prerequisites: consent of advisor. One to nine credit hours to be determined at the time of registration.