Faculty Roles and Rewards II Non-Tenure Track – 403.23

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University of Arkansas at Little Rock
Policy Name: Faculty Roles and Rewards II: Non-Tenure Track
Policy Number: 403.23 (formerly 455.2)
Effective Date: September 14, 2011

Promotion & Tenure Guidelines

Policy:

Introduction

The Faculty Roles and Rewards Task Force II (FRR2) was created in fall 2008 to study the roles of full-time, non-tenure track faculty (hereinafter “FT-NTT faculty”) at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock (UALR) and to consider rewards for this cohort. These faculty are important members of the UALR community. They make up 20 percent of the faculty, teach 29.2 percent of the courses, and are found in most but not all departments across the university. Although they are not eligible for tenure, they have contributed in diverse ways to the educational, service, and scholarly missions of the university. Some join our community on a temporary basis, while others have served UALR for many years. Some have primarily teaching responsibilities, while others serve important administrative and clinical roles.

The FRR2 Task Force believes that the contributions of FT-NTT faculty, like their tenure-track colleagues, should be recognized and their responsibilities should be clearly identified. We therefore offer the following motion to the Faculty Senate:

That the Faculty Senate recommend to the chancellor that UALR adopt the following framework for an advancement system for full-time non-tenure track faculty demonstrating significant commitment and expertise who choose to participate in an advancement system.

The FRR2 Task Force recognizes the diversity of FT-NTT roles in units across campus, as well as the different structures adopted in various disciplines. This document therefore proposes a general structure for all units to follow. The specific details and necessary changes to governance documents will be left to the appropriate units in the colleges and departments.

Background

In the 2007-2008 academic year, there were 101 FT-NTT teaching positions at UALR. They taught 43,000 SSCH, which was 30 percent of the total SSCH. Two methods were used to determine responsibilities as determined by various departments and to gather opinions of these faculty regarding experiences and expectations. Department chairs were interviewed by task force members whenever possible. FT-NTT faculty was invited to attend one in a series of roundtable discussions. Fifty-eight (58) participated in these discussions.


*With a few exceptions and based on circumstances, most of these faculty have the title instructor. For simplicity’s sake, we use this term throughout the document.


Several differences were identified concerning how FT-NTT faculty is integrated into department activities. Among these are compensation, voting privileges, teaching load, service, and scholarship/professional development.

The task force reviewed policies from LSU, Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis, and the University of Colorado Boulder, among others.

Instructor Advancement System

General Principles (with reference to the UALR Faculty Handbook – 1996 version)
  1. As faculty, FT-NTT instructors enjoy the rights and responsibilities outlined in the UALR Faculty Handbook for faculty in general, including but not limited to those pertaining to appointments, dismissals, annual review, and faculty excellence awards. (See Faculty Handbook section, “Policies Governing Faculty Service,” pp. 49-64.)
  2. As non-tenure track faculty, FT-NTT instructors are not eligible for tenure or for non-reappointment procedures. (See Faculty Handbook on Tenure and on Non-Reappointment at pages 52-54.)
  3. Departments and/or colleges shall develop appropriate criteria and procedures for FT-NTT advancement. These policies shall be submitted to the dean, the chief academic officer, and the chancellor for approval. Peer evaluation shall be a component of the evaluation at either the departmental or college level. (This parallels the requirement of peer review for promotion procedures. See Faculty Handbook on promotion, page 52.)
  4. Departments and/or colleges shall develop appeal procedures for those desiring reconsideration of a negative advancement decision. These policies shall be submitted to the dean, the chief academic officer, and the chancellor for approval. Should a faculty member continue an appeal beyond the dean, he or she shall do so through the Faculty Appeals Council. (See Faculty Handbook describing the Faculty Appeals Council at page 40; and see the section, “Faculty Appeals and Grievance Procedures,” pp. 105-106, describing its procedures.)
  5. Since the decision to pursue advancement is not mandatory, an application for advancement shall be initiated by the FT-NTT faculty member, who shall prepare materials to support the application.
  6. Recommendations for advancement shall be forwarded by the department chair and/or dean to the chief academic officer and then the chancellor for approval.
Tiers

The FFR2 Task Force recommends a three-tier system for advancement. Departments and/or colleges shall revise their appropriate governance documents to reflect this system in accordance with the guidelines below. Participation in this system by individual FT-NTT faculty members is voluntary and open to those FT-NTT faculty members who demonstrate significant commitment and expertise.

The three tiers in the advancement system are:

Tier On: Instructor

A Tier One faculty member is normally a full-time and non-tenure track member with a master’s degree or terminal degree. A department may choose to apply outside work experience (e.g., experience in a relevant profession) as equivalent in accordance with appropriate governance document.

Teaching, administrative, service, and/or professional development responsibilities are determined in accordance with the appropriate governance document.

A Tier One faculty member is not required to pursue advancement.

Tier Two: Advanced Instructor

A Tier Two faculty member is normally a FT-NTT faculty member with a master’s degree or terminal degree who has held the rank of Tier One for at least five (5) years. A department has the option of giving credit for outside work experience (e.g., experience in a relevant profession) in meeting the experience requirement, in accordance with the appropriate governance document.

Application for advancement to Tier Two is the responsibility of the Tier One faculty member. A department may consider excellence in teaching alone as sufficient for advancement to Tier Two, but departments may also take additional factors into account when considering the application for advancement, e.g., scholarship, professional development, and service.

Departments, in accordance with the appropriate governance document, will determine the criteria for advancement.

Advancement to Tier Two will be accompanied by an appropriate increase in salary.

A Tier Two faculty member is not required to pursue advancement.

Tier Three: Senior Instructor

A Tier Three faculty member is normally a full-time and non-tenure track faculty member with a master’s degree or terminal degree who has held the rank of Tier One for a minimum of five (5) years and Tier Two for a minimum of five (5) years. A department has the option of giving credit for outside work experience (e.g., experience in a relevant profession) in meeting the experience requirement, in accordance with the appropriate governance document.

Application for advancement to Tier Three is the responsibility of the Tier Two faculty member.

A department may consider excellence in teaching alone as sufficient for advancement to Tier Three, but departments may also take additional factors into account when considering the application for advancement, e.g., scholarship, professional development, and service.

Departments, in accordance with the appropriate governance document, will determine the criteria for advancement.

Advancement to Tier Three will be accompanied by an appropriate increase in salary.

For All Tiers

All FT-NTT faculty currently employed will be given credit for experience already accumulated as a UALR faculty member at the implementation date of this advancement system. Those who have been instructors for at least ten years at the time the policy is enacted may apply for tiers two and three simultaneously.

FT-NTT faculty members are eligible for Off-Campus Duty Assignment (OCDA), consistent with the Faculty Handbook and departmental resources. (See Faculty Handbook in the section, “Information Related to Faculty Service,” p. 76.)

Voting privileges are determined by the department and/or college and should be included in the appropriate governance document. It is recommended that FT-NTT faculty be granted voting privileges on matters that pertain to them.

Criteria for Advancement

As noted above, departments may determine that excellence in teaching alone is sufficient for advancement for FT-NTT faculty. However, FRR2 recommends that departments have discretion to take into consideration contributions by such faculty above and beyond their teaching responsibilities, e.g., scholarship, professional development, and service.

Teaching

The UALR mission statement places teaching as a central value. “The mission of the university is to develop the intellect of students; to discover and disseminate knowledge; to serve and strengthen society by enhancing awareness in scientific, technical areas; and to promote humane sensitivities and understanding of interdependence.” FT-NTT faculty is expected to demonstrate effective teaching in response to this mission.

The 2006 Roles and Rewards Task Force I identified universal qualities of effective teaching. Although they were listed with tenured faculty in mind, they apply to non-tenured faculty as well. “The nature of effective teaching may vary across disciplines, but certain qualities are universal: respect for students, faith in student abilities, a focus on student learning, and a commitment to student success. Equally important, faculty should view themselves as role models who convey the values of their disciplines and initiate students into their professions. In the pursuit of excellence in teaching, faculty members must remain current in their discipline and in pedagogical strategies. They should consider teaching a continual process of improvement and growth.”

Teaching is the primary role of FT-NTT faculty and complements the activities of the tenure-track faculty. Student, campus, and community needs cannot always be met by tenure-track faculty alone. In many instances FT-NTT faculty can meet those needs and allow the institution flexibility that might not otherwise be possible.

As an individual advances through the non-tenure track ranks from Tier One to Tier Three, the non-tenure track faculty member’s teaching can be evaluated in a number of ways. Although these methods may be determined by the individual departments, FRR2 suggests following the criteria in the UALR Faculty Handbook, which calls for a combination of student evaluations, peer evaluations (which may include classroom visits), self-evaluation, curriculum design and development, and creative/innovative teaching strategies. Other factors that the department may consider in evaluating teaching include the number of different course preparations taught by a faculty member, whether the faculty member teaches graduate as well as undergraduate courses, and the ability of the faculty member to teach with a variety of delivery methods, including traditional face-to-face, fully on-line, and hybrid courses.

Scholarship/Professional Development

Advancement from one tier to another may include scholarship/professional development. The criteria will be determined by each department.

FRRl endorsed Earnest Boyer’s views. As Boyer writes, “What we urgently need today is a more inclusive view of what it means to be a scholar, a view that recognizes the great diversity of talent within the professoriate (Scholarship Reconsidered 24-25). That talent is also reflected among the FT-NTT faculty who, when appropriate, should be encouraged, supported, and recognized for engaging in scholarship and faculty development. FRRl adopted Boyer’s four categories, adding a fifth one, the Scholarship of Creativity:

  • Scholarship of Discovery. The systematic inquiry or investigation designed to validate and refine existing knowledge and generate new knowledge.
  • Scholarship Creativity. The creation of or performance of original works of art, literature, music, film, and theater. It may also include the creation of new forms, electronic or digital media.
  • Scholarship Application. The use of professional expertise or information in the process of solving social or community problems.
  • Scholarship of Integration. Involves synthesis across theories or across academic fields.
  • Scholarship of Teaching. Should be a reflection of excellence in teaching as well as a rigorous form of scholarship in which a faculty member systematically examines the impact of pedagogy upon learning.

Among the professional development opportunities might be workshops offered on the campus, sessions offered by the Academy for Teaching and Learning Excellence, STAR courses, and continuing education or consulting to maintain professional skills.

It is important that the department chair and personnel committee clearly define in the appropriate governance document what is meant by scholarship and professional development and what is expected of FT-NTT faculty.

Service

An application for advancement from one tier to the next need not require, but can be enhanced by, the performance of service. Areas of service may include: (1) service to the department; (2) service to the university; (3) service in the faculty member’s profession; or (4) service in the community.

(1) Service to the department may mean participation in committees and councils essential to the mission of the department. Committees on which FT-NTT faculty might participate will depend on the discretion of the department chair but may include assessment, curriculum, or recruitment committees.

(2) Service to the university may include participation on committees, councils, task forces, or election to the Faculty Senate. Generally service to the university, other than election to the Faculty Senate, will be through appointments by the department chair, college dean, or upper administration officials.

(3) Service to the faculty member’s profession can enhance an application for advancement. Service to the profession may include serving as an officer or on a committee in a professional organization; planning and coordinating a conference or event; editing or contributing to the publication of a professional journal; and reviewing manuscripts, grants, programs, and books.

(4) Service in the community is the application of a FT-NTT faculty members’ expertise to the community at the local, state, regional, national or international level and may also enhance an application for advancement. Typical examples of service may include involvement in task forces seeking to solve community problems; consulting with government, business, and non-profit organizations; training and presentations; and program review, coordination and development.

Each department and college will have its unique ideas for service in the four areas described above. Typically, the type of service and the time allocated to service will be determined by the department chair and the personnel committee. It is important that the department chair and personnel committee clearly define in the appropriate governance document what is meant by service and what is expected of FT-NTT faculty.


Source: Faculty Senate
Revised:
Approved by:
Custodian: Office of the Provost