Anne Fulk Memorial Lecture with Deborah Skok, Professor of History at Hendrix College – That Red-Headed Devil: Jane Hoey and Women’s Leadership in the New Deal

The Great Depression of the 1930s produced widespread unemployment, hunger and misery in the United States and around the world. In response, FDR’s New Deal created several new government agencies to promote the economic security of the American people. Within the new Social Security Bureau, social worker Jane Hoey took charge of relief programs for poor mothers and their children. Because women’s leadership in government was still a relative novelty in the 1930s, female New Dealers like Hoey pioneered new ways to establish their authority. Hoey called upon all her resources to do so, drawing upon both her professional experience and ethnicity. Hoey built an image of herself in which red-headed Irishness was equated with strength, stubbornness, and willingness to fight for a good cause. Hoey used this image to fight for the professionalism of her staff and the rights of poor mothers and children.

Refreshments and an informal atmosphere encourage the interchange of ideas.  Refreshments are served at 7 p.m., and the talk begins at 7:30 p.m.

Subscribers to the series help support historical research. See the History Institute’s website for subscription information.

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Barclay Key – The 1967 Little Rock Crisis

The infamous 1957 desegregation crisis at Little Rock’s Central High School became emblematic of the short-term challenges in desegregating public schools after the Supreme Court’s Brown decision. However, few people know about the Little Rock School District’s subsequent efforts to desegregate. Behind the leadership of a school board controlled by local business elites and a compliant superintendent, the district minimized desegregation as much as possible. When supporters of desegregation captured a majority on the school board in 1966, however, they pushed for more substantive changes. Their recommendations created a public outcry. Segregationists regained control of the school board through elections in September 1967 and March 1968, and they effectively stopped further desegregation until 1971. This lecture introduces the Oregon Plan, that was the basis for the 1966 Board’s recommendations, analyzes the results of the 1967 and 1968 elections, and interprets the long-term consequences for the city’s refusal to desegregate its schools.

Refreshments and an informal atmosphere encourage the interchange of ideas.  Refreshments are served at 7:00 p.m., and the talk begins at 7:30 p.m.

Subscribers to the series help support historical research. See the History Institute’s website for subscription information.

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Curator Lecture: Brad Cushman

Gallery Director Brad Cushman will talk about the Department of Art and Design’s relationship with the Windgate Foundation and how they have helped build UA Little Rock’s permanent collection of artwork.

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Thomas Kaiser – Running for the Border: The Royal Family Tries to Escape the French Revolution

Two years into the French Revolution, Louis XVI and Marie-Antoinette were virtual prisoners in the Tuileries Palace and looking towards an even darker fate.  On the night of June 20/21, 1791, they and their children made a daring escape from Paris in disguise and headed towards France’s eastern border, only to be stopped at the town of Varennes and returned to Paris in humiliation. But had they intended to leave the country?  The purpose of this talk is to recount the events of this episode, to examine the intentions of the royal family, and to discuss the impact of this event on the subsequent course of the French Revolution.

Refreshments and an informal atmosphere encourage the interchange of ideas.  Refreshments are served at 7:00 p.m., and the talk begins at 7:30 p.m.

Subscribers to the series help support historical research. See the History Institute’s website for subscription information.

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Ed Anson – Manipulating the Word of God: The Use and Abuse of Greek Oracles

The polytheism associated with paganism made possible definitions of piety which would astound a monotheist. This is seen in what might be called the use and abuse of oracles. These physical sites where one might query a god were common throughout the Greek world, and thus “shopping around” for a favorable oracle was not uncommon, nor impious. This talk will look at this practice in general and concentrate on one of the most famous cases that of Alexander the Great and the Oracle of Zeus/Ammon in the Libyan desert.

Refreshments and an informal atmosphere encourage the interchange of ideas. Refreshments are served at 7 p.m., and the talk begins at 7:30 p.m.

Subscribers to the series help support historical research. See the History Institute’s website for subscription information.

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John Kirk – Sixtieth Anniversary Reflections on the 1957 Desegregation of Little Rock’s Central High School

Sixty years after the dramatic events surrounding the 1957 desegregation of Little Rock’s Central High School, which led to President Dwight D. Eisenhower deploying federal troops to ensure the safety of nine black students, this talk reflects on how historical and popular culture representations of events in Little Rock have located the school crisis within the context of the broader civil rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s. It examines how different approaches to the school crisis by historians from local, state, regional, national, and international perspectives have produced different understandings of the events that unfolded in the city. In many ways, the historiography of the 1957 Little Rock school crisis provides a microcosm of the wider trends that have shaped historical representations of the civil rights movement. The talk also explores how popular culture representations of the school crisis have influenced and shaped intellectual debate in a wide variety of media including theatre, film, essays, poetry and music.

Refreshments and an informal atmosphere encourage the interchange of ideas.  Refreshments are served at 7:00 p.m., and the talk begins at 7:30 p.m.

Subscribers to the series help support historical research. See the History Institute’s website for subscription information.

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Jess Porter – Know Your American Energy Booms: A Brief History of the 21st Century Shale Revolution

The United States is reprising its role as a global leader in hydrocarbon production as horizontal drilling and new methods of hydraulic fracturing have unleashed a torrent of American “tight” oil and natural gas on the global market. How does the “shale revolution” parallel or diverge from historic energy booms? This primer on recent energy development aims to provide the audience with a better understanding of the enabling technologies and the global impact of the shale revolution.

Refreshments and an informal atmosphere encourage the interchange of ideas. Refreshments are served at 7 p.m. and the talk begins at 7:30 p.m.

Subscribers to the series help support historical research. See the History Institute’s website for subscription information.

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