CSSC Research and Creative Works Digest


The College of Social Sciences and Communication is strongly committed to supporting the research and creative activities of its faculty. This digest is published six times a year to offer resources to faculty to aid their scholarly work. Resources are divided into four categories: Funding Opportunities, Data and Technology, Conferences and CFPs, and Campus Events.

CSSC Summer Research/Creative Activity Fellowships

Fellowship Information

The CSSC Summer Research/Creative Activity Fellowships are designed to support up to four tenure-track (Assistant, Associate, or Full Professor) faculty members in their research or creative activity in the summer 2020. The stipend will be the equivalent of 7.5% of the base (9 month) salary. Faculty are expected to teach no more than one course during the summer and engage in research or creative activity full time during the funding period. The summer research/creative activity fellowship must be completed by the end of fiscal year 2020 (June 30, 2020).

Fellowship applications are due via electronic submission by March 8 at 5:00 p.m. Funding decisions will be made by the Dean based upon review and recommendation of faculty applications by the College Awards Committee. Award notifications will be made by March 15, 2020.

Application Submission Process

Applications can be submitted online here.

In order to be eligible for a fellowship, a faculty must prepare and submit a research proposal containing the following information:

1) An up to date, chronological CV
2) Abstract
3) Justification for the proposed project
4) Proposed method
5) Potential implications
6) Potential for the work to raise the profile of the department, college, and university
7) Connection of the work to the mission of the college and university
8) Previous support received for work of the project (research release, internal and external grant funding, OCDA)
9) A letter of support from the Department Chair or School Director

Proposal should be limited to four double-spaced pages (excluding references and letter of support).

Grant Eligibility and Recipient Responsibility

Tenure-track faculty with full-time appointments in the College of Social Sciences and Communication are eligible for funding. Fellowship recipients will be expected to present work resulting from the fellowship in a suitable college forum. Priority will extend to any faculty or researchers who have not received CSSC research support in the previous two years. Untenured tenure-track faculty are especially encouraged to apply.

Please direct any questions to:
Dr. Molly Smith
Chair of the College Awards Committee
College of Social Sciences and Communication
mesmith8@ualr.edu
(501) 569-3461

 

Call for Proposals

CSSC Research and Creative Activity Grant

Proposals for research and creative activity funding are due via electronic submission by March 1 at 5:00 p.m.  Funding decisions will be made by the Dean based upon review and recommendation of faculty applications by the College Research and Creative Activity Committee.  Award notifications will be made by March 6, 2020. The maximum amount of a single award is $2,000, which must be used by the end of FY 2020. The number and amount of awards will be based on available funds.  

 

These grants funds have to be spent by June 30, 2020. Conference travel after June 30 is not an allowable expense for this grant. 

 

The following activities may receive funding: 

  1. Travel to conduct research or in direct support of creative activity
  2. Travel to disseminate research or creative activity;
  3. Travel to attend pre-application meetings for grants;
  4. Costs of attending skills workshops (such as those offered by ICPSR)
  5. Equipment needs associated with research and creative activity
  6. Other expenses relevant to research

 

Applications can be submitted online at http://ualr.edu/cssc/research-2/ and will require the following:

  1. A one page narrative statement of the research or creative project; 
  2. A proposed budget. The funds must be spent by June 30. Please include in your budget proposal your plans to spend the funds by June 30. 
  3. An up to date, chronological CV

 

The following criteria will be used in allocating awards. Please address in your narrative statement all of the criteria that are applicable to your project.

  1. Necessity of funds to complete or disseminate research or creative activity;
  2. Necessity of funds beyond available support in the department;
  3. Potential for the work to raise the profile of the department, college, and university;
  4. Connection of the work to the mission of the college and university;
  5. Opportunities for students to benefit from or become involved in the research/creative activity;
  6. Connection to instruction;
  7. Promise of grant funding (as applicable).
  8. Amount of potential grant funding (as applicable).

 

Grant Eligibility and Recipient Responsibility:  Faculty and researchers with full-time appointments in the College of Social Sciences and Communication are eligible for funding.  Grant recipients will be expected to present work resulting from grant funding in a college forum arranged by the Research and Scholarly Activity Committee by the conclusion of the award period.  Priority will extend to any faculty or researchers who have not received an award in the previous funding period. Untenured tenure-track faculty are especially encouraged to apply. The committee also encourages faculty to consider the Survey Research Center when developing their proposal.

Please direct any questions to Dr. Rebecca Glazier, raglazier@ualr.edu

January 2020

Table of Contents

  • A Guide to Proposal Planning and Writing
  • On the Art of Writing Proposals
  • All About Grants Tutorials
  • Grants.gov
  • Grants Resource Center Website
  • The National Study of Postsecondary Faculty
  • Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR)
  • Healthdata.gov
  • The Parent and Family Involvement in Education (PFI) Survey

A Guide to Proposal Planning and Writing

http://www.msu.edu/course/prr/371/GRANTS/proposalwriting3.htm

From Oryx Press, a condensed version of a book, Proposal Planning and Writing, 2nd edition, written by Lynn E. Miner, Jeremy T. Miner and Jerry Griffiths. Despite references to parts of the book not available in this version, this is a very good overview of the grant-getting process,

including suggestions for preliminary groundwork before writing the proposal, as well as a discussion of the various parts of the proposal itself. The authors address applications both to government agencies and to foundations. Includes a sample submission letter.

On The Art of Writing Proposals

http://www.ssrc.org/workspace/images/crm/new_publication_3/%7B7a9cb4f4-815f-de11-bd8 0-001cc477ec70%7D.pdf

This article contains advice from the Social Science Research Council. Several granting agencies suggest that grant-seekers read this article.

All About Grants Tutorials

http://www.niaid.nih.gov/ncn/grants/default.htm

From the NIAID. These “All About Grants” tutorials help investigators, especially new ones, plan, write, and apply for the basic NIH research project grant, the R01.

Grants.gov

http://www.grants.gov/

Grants.gov is an E-Government initiative that provides a centralized location for grant seekers to find and apply for federal funding opportunities. The Grants.gov system houses information on over 1,000 grant programs and vets grant applications for 26 federal grant-making agencies.

Using the Grants.gov system makes it faster, easier and more cost effective for grant applicants to electronically interact with federal grant-making agencies.

Grants Resource Center Website

http://www.aascu.org/grc/

The Grants Resources Center (GRC) is available on-line. This site is a clearinghouse for funding opportunities, rules and regulations, comment requests, and meetings relevant to sponsored programs and research administration activities on member campuses. If you would like to

access the resources of the GRC website, please contact Sarah Beth Estes (sbestes@ualr.edu) for a username and password.

Data and Technology

The National Study of Postsecondary Faculty

https://nces.ed.gov/surveys/nsopf/design.asp

The National Study of Postsecondary Faculty (NSOPF) collected information on the backgrounds, responsibilities, salaries, attitudes and future plans of faculty across the United States. In addition, information was collected on turnover, recruitment, retention, and tenure policies.

There are four surveys available: NSOPF:88, NSOPF:93, NSOPF:99, and NSOPF:04. The 2004 survey included 35,000 faculty from 1,080 public and private degree granting institutions.

Although the 1988 survey only included faculty whose assignment included instruction, all other surveys included faculty who did not teach and non-faculty instructors as well. The contact person for this data at UALR is Dr. Jim Vander Putten at jvputten@ualr.edu.

Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR)

https://www.icpsr.umich.edu/

An international consortium of more than 700 academic institutions and research organizations, ICPSR provides leadership and training in data access, curation, and methods of analysis for the social science research community.

ICPSR maintains a data archive of more than 500,000 files of research in the social sciences. It hosts 16 specialized collections of data in education, aging, criminal justice, substance abuse, terrorism, and other fields.

Healthdata.gov

http://www.healthdata.gov

This site is dedicated to making high value health data more accessible to entrepreneurs, researchers, and policy makers in the hopes of better health outcomes for all. HHS has begun “liberating” health data through the Health Data Initiative — making more and more data from HHS’ vaults (from CMS, CDC, FDA and NIH, to name a few sources) easily available and accessible to the public and to innovators across the country. This information includes clinical care provider quality information, nationwide health service provider directories, databases of the latest medical and scientific knowledge, consumer product data, community health performance information, government spending data and much more.

The Parent and Family Involvement in Education (PFI) Survey

http://nces.ed.gov/nhes/

The Parent and Family Involvement in Education (PFI) Survey is part of the National Household Education Survey (NHES) program. It is a cross-sectional survey that collects data directly from households on a variety of educational issues. The 2012 survey directly collected data from 17,563 households of children age 20 and younger in kindergarten through 12th grade. The survey collected information on “school choice, parent and family involvement at school, school behavior, grade retention, involvement in schoolwork, involvement and activities outside of school, factors affecting family involvement, and parents’ satisfaction with the child’s school”. The data can be downloaded for free at the NCES website.

Conferences and CFPs

To view this digest as a PDF, click here
To view past digests, click here

Past Digests

October 2015

September 2015

April 2015

March 2015

February 2015

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