Master of Social Work

Photo of a smiling family in the park.

The mission of the graduate program of the UA Little Rock School of Social Work, is to prepare graduates for leadership roles in clinical practice and in management and community practice within the social welfare system in Arkansas. Our commitment is to discover and disseminate knowledge, embrace diversity, to serve our communities and organizations, and to eliminate the barriers that oppressed and vulnerable people face.

Towards this mission, MSW program faculty prepare graduates not only for general social work practice, but also one of two specialized concentrations; Advanced Direct Practice (clinical) work or Management and Community Practice. Each student receives individual academic and professional advising from a faculty member.

The UA Little Rock School of Social Work MSW program is nationally accredited by the Council on Social Work Education.


3 STEPS TO YOUR CAREER IN SOCIAL WORK

Step 1: Apply to UA Little Rock Graduate School

Graduate School Admission

  • Apply for admission to the UA Little Rock Graduate School.
  • Pay a $40 non-refundable application fee via the link in the initial application email or by contacting the Cashier’s Office.
  • Submit all official transcripts from ALL previously attended colleges and universities (undergraduate and graduate).
    • International students must have their transcripts articulated. Transcripts that have not been articulated can be submitted for the application process; however, if a student is granted admission, WES-articulated transcripts must be submitted to the Graduate School before he or she can register for classes.
  • Provide proof of 2 MMR vaccines. Contact your program coordinator if you think you are eligible for a waiver. Only students in the UA Little Rock Online programs are exempt.
  • Provide proof of a grade point average of at least 2.75 on a 4.00 scale, including post-baccalaureate hours.
  • Provide a copy of your government-issued photo ID.

International Student Admission

Required documents for international admission:

  • Tuberculosis screening
    • All applicants must provide proof of a tuberculosis screening, which must be performed in the United States of America and can be done at the Health Services Center at UA Little Rock.
  • Health and accident insurance
    • All international students must purchase the health and accident insurance provided by UA Little Rock and maintain coverage year-round. Students will be billed at the beginning of each fall and spring semester. A student who enters in a summer semester will be billed for that semester as well, making the total number of times billed three instead of two. If you have any questions, please contact Health Services at 501-569-3188.
  • Transfer forms
    • Applicants transferring from another institution within the United States of America must also provide a Transfer and Visa form completed by the applicant’s International Student Services advisor from his or her current institution.
  • Financial statement (students with F and J visas only)
    • Before students can be accepted into the Graduate School, you must provide a financial statement showing that they are financially capable of pursuing a graduate education in the United States of America. For more information on this form, please contact the office of International Student Services at 501-683-7566.
  • All applicants must submit a copy of their visa.

Transfer Students

Only applicants from other Council of Social Work Education (CSWE) accredited graduate social work programs will be considered for transfer admission. The applicant must have an overall GPA of at least 3.0 in graduate work. No grade lower than a B will be accepted for credit. An official statement from the former school indicating the student is in good standing is required. The concentration year (28 hours) of graduate study must be completed at UA Little Rock.

Only one graduate-level course from the UA Little Rock MSW program, other departments at UA Little Rock, or other universities taken prior to the student’s beginning of core MSW courses at UA Little Rock may be considered for transfer as an elective course. Students must submit a request of transfer of credit at or before the time of their enrollment. The request should include a cover letter, which discusses the content of the course (other than UA Little Rock MSW courses) and its relevance to social work. A copy of the course outline shall be attached. This request should be addressed to the chair of the curriculum committee.

In the event that the curriculum committee accepts requests for transfer of credit, the application is forwarded to the Graduate School dean who then reviews the transfer of credit. Transfer grades are not computed as part of a student’s UA Little Rock cumulative GPA.

Courses taken in other fields generally will not be considered for credit and in no instance will more than six hours be considered for transfer. Requests for a course waiver or transfer of credit must be made at or before the time of enrollment.

Step 2: Pick Your Pathway


There are three program options available to students pursuing an MSW degree. All programs are offered in Little Rock.

Full-time program

This program is designed for individuals who have a bachelor’s degree in a field other than social work or those who have a BSW but whose overall GPA is less than 3.5. It is designed to be completed in two years.


Part-time program

The part-time program is designed to be completed in three years, although a student may take up to four calendar years from the initial date of enrollment to complete the degree. A minimum of two courses must be taken each semester with appropriate sequencing of courses as outlined in the curriculum. One of the goals of the part-time program is to develop opportunities for students who are employed in the human services to be able to complete their internships. Students in this part-time alternative would need support from their employing agencies for completing fieldwork requirements. In an effort to make this equivalent to more traditional options for completing the program, some restrictions may apply to field work. It is important to note that the experiences of the work site internship should differ significantly from the current roles and responsibilities assumed by the student.


Advanced Standing Program

This program allows qualified students who have earned a bachelor of social work degree from an institution accredited by the Council on Social Work Education (during the previous five years) to complete the MSW degree in a shorter, concentrated program. This program may be completed on either a full-time (12 months) or part- time (21 months) basis. Students in the full-time program are expected to begin their coursework in late May and to be enrolled full-time in the summer, fall, and spring semesters. The Advanced Standing Program is currently offered only to those who attend the main campus as there is no Advanced Standing Program offered to online students


Special Student Status

Some social work elective courses are open to interested individuals for professional advancement or enrichment. If an individual is later admitted to the social work program, one social work elective is transferable toward the MSW degree. Enrollment in these courses does not guarantee admission.

Step 3: Apply to the MSW Program

Program Admission

Regular admission to the Master of Social Work program requires:

  • A completed application forms for the Graduate School and School of Social Work.
  • A baccalaureate degree with a liberal arts background from an accredited institution.
  • An overall undergraduate GPA of 3.0.
    • An applicant whose undergraduate GPA is just below a 3.0 may be considered for conditional admission.
  • Satisfactory scores within the last five years on either the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) or the Miller Analogies Test (MAT).
  • A narrative statement of professional orientation (format included in the application packet).
  • Three letters of reference from people who know the applicant in professional, academic, and volunteer settings that indicate a propensity for both academics and social work practice (included with online application).
  • Acceptable references indicating a propensity for both academics and social work practice.
  • Official transcripts with the baccalaureate degree posted prior to the student enrolling in a graduate level course.

Advanced Standing Applicants ONLY
In order to be considered for the Advanced Standing program, applicants must:

  • Meet all the requirements outlined above for Regular Admission
  • Have a bachelor’s degree in social work (BSW) from a CSWE-accredited undergraduate program with a cumulative GPA of 3.0.
  • Must have a 3.5 GPA in last 60 hours of undergraduate studies.
  • Have earned their degree within the last five years.
  • Submit a copy of all field/internship evaluations.
  • Submit a recommendation written by a faculty member in the applicant’s undergraduate social work program.

Volunteer, employment, and other life experiences relevant to the career choice of social work are considered in the admission decision.


Application Deadlines

Applicants to the Master of Social Work program may be admitted as full-time, part-time, or advanced standing students. Deadlines are as follows:

February 1st:

  • full-time advanced standing program starting in the summer
  • full-time 60 hour program starting in the fall
  • part-time 60 hour program and part-time advanced standing program starting in the fall
  • part-time 60 hour online program starting in the fall

November 1st:

  • part-time 60 hour program starting in the spring
  • part-time 60 hour online program starting in the spring
  • part-time advanced standing program starting in the spring

Review of Applications and Admission

Evaluations of MSW applications are accepted at any time, but should be completed by the deadline provided on the application material. Applicants are encouraged to apply as early as possible. All application materials must be received by the deadline. Incomplete applications will not be considered for admission.

Although we will admit for the spring and summer semesters, most core courses begin in the fall. The majority of the MSW courses are offered in sequential fashion. Therefore, students admitted to the master’s program in the spring can only enroll part-time for the spring and summer semesters. Only students admitted to the advanced-standing program will begin their core courses in the summer.



CHOOSING YOUR CONCENTRATION

Young woman with glass working on her laptop in a library.

All MSW students begin their course of study with core social work classes to build a strong generalist foundation. In their final year in the program, MSW students have the opportunity to choose one of two concentrations:

  • Advanced Direct Practice (ADP): Clinical Concentration
  • Management and Community Practice (MCP) Concentration: Macro Concentration

Advanced Direct Practice (ADP)


Advanced Direct Practice (often called clinical social work) students take a series of advanced courses that provide knowledge and skills to work with individuals, families, and groups. Clinical social workers provide mental health care and other supportive resources directly to diverse individuals, families, and groups using a range of evidenced-based approaches. Working in settings such as community clinics, prisons, hospitals, schools, and client homes, clinical social workers collaborate with colleagues in medicine, nursing, criminal justice, education, and other human services to improve well-being one client a time.

The central focus of clinical social work is on the mental, emotional, and behavioral well-being of individuals, families, and groups. The clinical social worker is able to assess and intervene at multiple levels, addressing both the internal and external factors that impact client functioning. The clinical social worker is able to draw on both evidence-informed and traditional models of practice and is specifically trained in drawing on theory to guide practice.

Clinical social workers practice in a variety of practice settings including community mental health centers, hospitals, substance use treatment and recovery facilities, primary health care, child welfare agencies, centers for aging services, employee assistance programs, and private practice settings.

The ADP clinical concentration prepares students for advanced practice with individuals, families, and groups in a variety of practice settings. The concentration includes knowledge of a range of both contemporary and traditional evidence-informed theories and models that guide practice. One of the central goals of the clinical concentration is to help students link theory with practice and develop the skills of a beginning level clinical social worker.

Students in the clinical concentration learn:

  • Knowledge and application of cognitive behavioral approaches to practice.
  • Knowledge and application of ego supportive psychotherapeutic approaches to practice.
  • Knowledge and application of family systems theory and a variety of contemporary family therapy models.
  • Knowledge and application of interpersonal group theory.
  • Critical thinking skills as they apply to the processes of engagement, assessment, intervention and evaluation with individuals, families and groups.
  • How to demonstrate ethical integrity through application of social work values in a variety of clinical situations.
  • Differential use of the professional relationship.
  • The importance of utilizing evidence-informed, or best practice approaches, with individuals, families and groups.
  • Increasing levels of self-awareness including the professional use of self to engage and work with diverse client populations.
  • Advocacy skills for practice delivery and policies that promote social and economic justice and equity when working with individuals, families, and groups.

Students who graduate from the advanced direct practice concentration have advanced skills in working autonomously and ethically with individuals, families, and groups in agency settings.

Management and Community Practice (MCP)


Management and Community Practice (MCP) students take a series of advanced courses that provide knowledge and skills to lead human services and governmental organizations, develop and evaluate social policies, develop grant and other funding applications, and advocate for change. While always a social worker, upon graduation these students may take positions with titles like policy analyst, grant writer, lobbyist, program evaluator, director, and coordinator. MCP social workers collaborate with elected leaders, government officials, community leaders, nonprofits, and advocacy groups to improve well-being one policy at a time.

Faculty pursue the School’s mission both by educating new social workers and by serving Arkansas communities directly by serving on agency boards, consulting on practice and evaluation, performing innovative research, and working directly with clients.

The central focus of the management and community practice concentration is on preparing social workers for leadership within the social service community at the macro level. Students are also able to assess and intervene at multiple levels, addressing both the internal and external factors that impact organizational and community functioning. The community practice social worker is able to draw on both evidence-informed and traditional models of practice and is specifically trained in drawing on theory to guide practice.

MCP social workers practice in a variety of organizations and practice settings such as child welfare agencies, policy and advocacy centers, aging services, educational facilities, employee assistance programs, public health organizations, and community based agencies. They also carry out a range of responsibilities such as policy analysis, program development and oversight, grant writing, fundraising, administration, outreach and volunteer coordination, and program evaluation.

The MCP concentration prepares students for advanced practice with individuals, groups, and organizations in a variety of practice settings but primarily focuses on the macro level. The concentration includes knowledge of a range of both contemporary and traditional evidence-informed theories and models that guide organizational practice. One of the central goals of the community concentration is to help students link theory with practice and develop the skills of a beginning level community social worker.

Students in the MCP concentration learn:

  • Knowledge and application of program planning.
  • Knowledge and application of program evaluation.
  • Knowledge and application of organizational and management theory and practice.
  • Knowledge and application of organizational effectiveness tools.
  • Critical thinking skills as they apply to the processes of leadership, engagement, assessment, intervention and evaluation with individuals, groups, programs, organizations and communities.
  • How to demonstrate ethical integrity through application of social work values in a variety of community and organizational situations.
  • The importance of utilizing evidence-informed or best practice approaches, with individuals, groups, programs, organizations, and communities.
  • The importance of utilizing culturally competent practice with individuals, groups, programs, organizations, and communities.
  • Increasing levels of self-awareness, including the professional use of self to engage and work with diverse client populations.
  • Advocacy skills for practice delivery and policies that promote social and economic justice and equity when working with individuals, groups, organizations and communities.

Students who graduate from the MCP concentration are prepared with the conceptual, analytical, technical, and interpersonal skills needed for planning, organizing, coordinating, evaluating, and leadership associated with management and community practice in community-based programs, hospital social services, and state health and human service bureaucracies.

Master of Social Work/Juris Doctor Concurrent Degree Program


The Master of Social Work/Juris Doctor concurrent degree program is offered with the UA Little Rock Bowen School of Law. Students enrolled in the concurrent MSW/JD program shall use specified courses to earn cross-credits to be applied toward the fulfillment of both degrees.

Students must obtain admission to both programs to receive cross-credit. To learn more about Bowen School of Law’s admission procedures and requirements, visit their Admissions page. Once admitted, students must submit a Declaration of Intent to Pursue Joint Degrees form. This form is also available in the School of Social Work and the School of Law admissions offices. Students are not considered enrolled in the concurrent program until both programs receive a copy of the completed form.

Current MSW program students may enter the concurrent program by gaining admission to the UA Little Rock School of Law and submitting a completed Declaration of Intent to Pursue Joint Degrees form to each program prior to completing the MSW. Students currently pursuing a JD must apply for admission to the MSW program prior to receiving the JD. To obtain maximum benefit for cross-credits, students should apply for the MSW program and UA Little Rock School of Law at the same time.

Students applying to the UA Little Rock School of Law and the UA Little Rock School of Social Work at the same time are not required to meet the GRE or MAT admission requirements for the MSW program. LSAT scores are used in lieu of those test scores.

Once students are admitted to both programs and the concurrent degree forms are on file in both offices, cross-credit for courses is earned according to the following conditions: a minimum grade of B in LAW courses Diversity and Oppression and Social Welfare Policy and a minimum grade of C in LAW 6331 or Law 6270 and LAW 6329 or LAW 6338 program cross-credit courses (up to 12 hours) while maintaining a 3.0 cumulative GPA in courses counted for the MSW degree

MSW/JD Concurrent Degree Plan

MSW Courses Approved for Credit in the JD Program

  • SOWK 7301 Foundations of Social Work Practice I
  • SOWK 7331 Foundations of Social Work Practice III
  • SOWK 8305 Management and Community Practice I
  • SOWK 8306 Management and Community Practice II
  • SOWK 7396 Crisis Problem Solving
  • SOWK 8253 Law and Social Work
  • SOWK 8242 Global Perspectives in Social Work
  • SOWK 8320 Family Mediation

JD Courses Approved for Credit in the MSW Program

  • LAW 6390 Diversity and Oppression
  • LAW 6350 Social Welfare Policy
  • LAW 6338 Alternative Dispute Resolution
  • LAW 6329 Mediation Seminar
  • LAW 6331 Family Law
  • LAW 6270 Juvenile Law

Download the Academic Advising Certification Form for the MSW/JD Program (PDF)



CURRICULUM AND COURSES

Students taking notes in a auditorium classroom.

The MSW curriculum consists of 60 hours of graduate work, including 32 foundation hours, 22 concentration hours, and six elective hours. Internships are an integral part of the curriculum design, totaling 18 hours of coursework or 1200 practice hours by graduation (1000 hours for advanced-standing students). Advanced-standing students are given credit for 17 hours of graduate work and need 43 hours to graduate.

Curriculum


There are currently three program options available to students pursuing an MSW degree: full-time, part-time, and advanced standing. Once admitted into the School of Social Work, students will formulate their specific degree plan with their assigned academic advisor.

Master of Social Work Regular Curriculum Plan (60 hours)

Below is an overview of the MSW degree plan. For a more detailed view of the regular MSW curriculum, please view our Full-time MSW Degree Plan (PDF) or Part-time MSW Degree Plan (PDF).

Foundation Courses (32 hours)

The first academic year for full-time students or the first two years for part-time students is referred to as the foundation year which grounds students in the common body of knowledge, values, and skills of the social work profession transferable among settings, population groups, and problem areas. In the classroom, students are given content on social work values and ethics, diversity, social and economic justice, populations-at-risk, human behavior and the social environment, social welfare policy and services, social work practice, and research. In the internship, the student is expected to apply foundation knowledge, skills, values, and ethics to practice.

  • SOWK 7330 Human Behavior in the Social Environment I
  • SOWK 7350 Social Welfare Policies & Services
  • SOWK 7390 Diversity & Oppression
  • SOWK 7301 Foundations of Social Work Practice I
  • SOWK 7403 Social Work Internship I
  • SOWK 7302 Foundations of Social Work Practice II
  • SOWK 7370 Social Work Research Methods
  • SOWK 7391 Assessment and Differential Diagnosis
  • SOWK 7331 Foundations of Social Work Practice III
  • SOWK 7404 Social Work Internship II
Concentration Courses (28 hours)

The second year for full-time students or the third year for part-time students of the program prepares students for advanced practice with a concentration in advanced direct practice or management and community practice. Students gain additional knowledge and skills in their chosen concentration through internships and electives.

Advanced Direct Practice Concentration

  • SOWK 8301 Advanced Directed Practice I
  • SOWK 8371 Statistics for Social Work
  • SOWK 8503 Advanced Direct Practice Internship I
  • SOWK 8302 Advanced Directed Practice II
  • SOWK 8390 Advanced Direct Practice III
  • SOWK 8504 Advanced Direct Practice Internship II
  • Electives (6 hours)*

Management and Community Practice Concentration

  • SOWK 8305 Management and Community Practice I
  • SOWK 8259 Evaluation Research I
  • SOWK 8371 Statistics for Social Work
  • SOWK 8507 Internship I Management & Community Practice
  • SOWK 8306 Management and Community Practice II
  • SOWK 8159 Evaluation Research II
  • SOWK 8508 Internship II Management & Community Practice
  • Electives (6 hours)*
All core courses are offered only once a year and maybe taught in day, evening, online, or weekend sections. We do not guarantee classes will be taught in the day, the evening, online, or the weekends every term.* Electives are scheduled to tie in with the concentration. However, they may be taken earlier, and several electives are generally offered during summer sessions. Many electives require second year standing. Please check the course descriptions. In addition, courses from the other concentration area may be taken as electives. Students must take at least one elective after completion of their core foundation year course work and must have 6 total hours of electives in order to graduate.

Master of Social Work Advanced Standing Curriculum Plan (43 hours)

Below is an overview of the MSW Advanced Standing degree plan. For a more detailed view of the Advanced Standing MSW curriculum, please view our Full-time Advanced Standing Degree Plan (PDF) or Part-time Advanced Standing Degree Plan (PDF).

Foundation Courses (15 hours)
  • SOWK 8316 Advanced Standing Seminar
  • SOWK 7370 Social Work Research Methods
  • SOWK 7391 Assessment and Differential Diagnosis
  • SOWK 7603 Advanced Standing Social Work Internship
Concentration Courses (28 hours)

Advanced Direct Practice Concentration

  • SOWK 8301 Advanced Directed Practice I
  • SOWK 8371 Statistics for Social Work
  • SOWK 8503 Advanced Direct Practice Internship I
  • SOWK 8302 Advanced Directed Practice II
  • SOWK 8390 Advanced Direct Practice III
  • SOWK 8504 Advanced Direct Practice Internship II
  • Electives (6 hours)*

Management and Community Practice Concentration

  • SOWK 8305 Management and Community Practice I
  • SOWK 8259 Evaluation Research I
  • SOWK 8371 Statistics for Social Work
  • SOWK 8507 Internship I Management & Community Practice
  • SOWK 8306 Management and Community Practice II
  • SOWK 8159 Evaluation Research II
  • SOWK 8508 Internship II Management & Community Practice
  • Electives (6 hours)*
*Students must take 6 CR of electives and may do so at any time in the program but are advised against doing so in the summer.

Graduation Requirements

Graduation Requirements

  • Satisfactory completion of approved program of study as outlined above.
  • At least 3.0 GPA in all core courses.
  • Faculty recommendation for degree.

Re-enrollment

Students who withdraw voluntarily from the program must reapply and be readmitted in accordance with general admissions procedures.

Course Descriptions


For a full list of courses and descriptions, please visit the UA Little Rock graduate catalog.

SOWK 5310 Social Gerontology
Prerequisite: graduate standing. This course explores the social aspects of aging – how do older adults affect society and how does society affect older adults? The interaction of older adults with society is examined along with many of our social institutions such as family, healthcare, government, and the economy. Also examined are the issues associated with our aging population and how those issues affect people of all ages. A number of current controversies associated with our changing population structure will be discussed in class.Three credit hours.

SOWK 5331 Introduction to Animal Assisted Therapy
This elective will explore the role of companion animals for people of all ages and the importance of including consideration of the role of animals in the helping professions. The course will cover the human-animal bond, physical and emotional health benefits of companion animals, the role of animals in the development of children and families, the use and impact of Animal Assisted Activity/Therapy with a variety of populations, including older adults, and ways in which professionals can include animals in their disciplines as teachers, companions, and facilitators. The course will include observations of AAT visits to human service settings, both in the community and long-term care, as well as web-enhanced classes. Students with credit for SOWK/GERO 4331 cannot receive credit for SOWK/GERO 5331. Cross-listed as GERO 5331. Three credit hours.

SOWK 5336 Social Aspects of Death and Dying
Gerontology and social work seek to apply knowledge from the social sciences, medicine, and the humanities with the skills and values of the helping professions. The multidisciplinary study of death (thanatology) itself comes out of studying these different disciplines. There are many social, psychological, philosophical, and religious theories concerning the passage of death– for both ourselves and those around us. We will study many diverse contributions in the social aspects of death and dying. Three credit hours.

SOWK 5337 Adult Development and Aging
This course emphasizes the life course perspective as it looks at adult development and aging within the context of the social environment. Aspects of “successful aging” that will be examined cover growth and development from emerging adulthood to old age, and the impact that culture, gender, ethnicity, and individual differences have on these processes. Human development and aging is examined during early adulthood, middle adulthood, and late adulthood. We will study aspects of development that are common to persons at all ages across the life course, individual differences in development, and differences that characterize the separate age cohorts. Three credit hours.

SOWK 7301 Foundations of Social Work Practice I
Prerequisite or corequisite: SOWK 7330. Study of social work profession and roles, values, and ethics of the profession; the generalist perspective; ecosystems perspective; strengths focus; empowerment practice; and the skills of engagement, assessment, and planning. Three credit hours.

SOWK 7302 Foundations of Social Work Practice II
Prerequisite: SOWK 7301. Continuation of SOWK 7301. Study of strategies and techniques of intervention with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities; practice evaluation; and termination. Three credit hours.

SOWK 7316 Advanced Standing Seminar
Prerequisite: advanced standing admission. Corequisite: SOWK 7603 and pre or corequisite SOWK 7370, 7391. Course is integrated with advanced standing internship to foster in-depth development of assessment, planning, intervention, and evaluation skills with a variety of client systems. Three credit hours.

SOWK 7320 Health and Biology of Aging
Prerequisite: graduate standing. Understanding the consequences of aging and the extension of life expectancy requires the concurrent understanding of the interrelationship of biology and behavior. Research on “normal” aging over the life span offers the potential of understanding the changes that occur with age so that we can use this understanding to anticipate and cope with those physiological and behavioral functions altered by aging in ourselves and as caregivers. The course will examine physiological and epidemiological studies of disease and aging as well as the alteration in sensory perception, muscle function, etc. Finally, the issues of interventions, realistic expectations, and ethics will also be examined. Three credit hours.

SOWK 7321 Aging and Social Policy
Prerequisite: graduate standing. This course offers an overview of aging and social policy issues, especially at the state and federal levels of government. Non-governmental agencies and organizations are also included. The aging network, healthcare including Medicare and Medicaid, as well as Social Security and retirement financing are highlighted. The course begins with a historical perspective on how we have gotten to our present health care policies. It then describes the aging network as well as the programs and services for the older adult that comprise this network. Three credit hours.

SOWK 7322 Assessment and Care Management of the Older Adult
Prerequisite: graduate standing. Assessment and Care Management with the Older Adult will offer students a comprehensive review of the emerging professional practice of Geriatric Care Management (GCM). Throughout this course students will review a variety of geriatric assessments as well as study case management tools such as engaging, assessing, planning, intervening, evaluating and terminating client cases. Critical thinking as an ethical professional will be emphasized as well as beginning interviewing skills. Three credit hours.

SOWK 7323 Impact of Illness and Disability
This course prepares professionals to work with those experiencing illness and disability across the life course, emphasizing strengths and resiliency. Ethical, as well as the bio-psycho-social-spiritual aspects of illness and disability in the individual, family and wider community are highlighted. Three credit hours.

SOWK 7327 Grief, Loss, and Social Work Practice
Prerequisite: graduate standing. Individuals, families, groups, and communities all experience loss. Losses may be developmental and expected, and some are traumatically unexpected. Losses come with life transitions, changing relationships, and, of course, death. Many clients with whom social workers will interact will need assistance understanding and adjusting to losses and grief reactions. Basic assessment and intervention skills for practice with client systems experiencing grief and loss will be emphasized. Three credit hours.

SOWK 7330 Human Behavior in the Social Environment I
Prerequisite: program admission. This course covers human behavior theories supporting social work practice with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. The ecological perspective and its impact on human development and non-mainstream groups will be addressed. Three credit hours.

SOWK 7331 Foundations of Social Work Practice III
Prerequisite: SOWK 7330. This course explores the application of social work skills to practice within communities and organizations. Students will assess a target community, write grant proposals, and learn the practice of interactive supervision. Three credit hours.

SOWK 7350 Social Welfare Policies and Services
Prerequisite: program admission. Study of the history and current structure of social welfare policy, the impact of discrimination, poverty and oppression on populations-at-risk, the response of society to social problems, and the skill of policy analysis. Three credit hours.

SOWK 7370 Social Work Research Methods
Prerequisite: program admission or special permission from instructor. The study of social work research methodology, critical evaluation of published research, the values and ethics of research practice. Three credit hours.

SOWK 7380 Global Perspectives in Social Work
Prerequisite: graduate standing. Building on first-year domestic social policy courses, the purpose of this course is to expose students to a variety of global social issues related to social welfare and social development. Engaging in critical thinking and analysis of social welfare issues, students will explore how political, economic, cultural, religious, historical, and environmental factors impact social welfare policies and the delivery of human services in different regions of the world, primarily North America, Africa, Asia, and the Middle East. Special emphasis will be given to the social issues created by HIV/AIDS, poverty, genocide, immigration, and war. By examining international models of social work practice, this course is also relevant to students who are working or having an interest in working with immigrant/refugee populations in the United States. Three credit hours.

SOWK 7390 Diversity and Oppression
Prerequisite: program admission. Ethnic, racial, gender issues as related to social policy, human behavior and the social environment, practice issues; developmental, socioeconomic factors influencing gender roles; historical considerations and cultural and social context for social work practice among oppressed persons, people of color. Three credit hours.

SOWK 7391 Assessment and Differential Diagnosis
Prerequisite: SOWK 7330. Psychopathology in children, adults; uses individual life cycle as framework for biological, social forces that prevent, limit individual social, psychological adaptation to environment during maturation process; emphasis on influence of gender and race on development of mental disorders, individual adaptation to social environment; use of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual, DSM-IIIR as diagnostic reporting tool. Three credit hours.

SOWK 7392 Special Topics in Clinical Social Work
This course is focused on evidence-based practice models for clinical social work practice. This course presents current and contemporary mental and behavioral health treatment models and is highly application oriented. The overall goal of the course is to help students develop beginning level knowledge and skills in the treatment and prevention of psychosocial dysfunction, disability, or impairment, including emotional and mental disorders. Three credit hours.

SOWK 7394 Social Work Practice in Schools
This course is an elective course designed to prepare students to be informed, resourceful, and proactive in providing services in the complex and dynamic context of the schools. The purpose of this course is to provide the social work student with knowledge of theories, concepts, and research about social work practice in schools. This course encourages students to engage in critical thinking which requires the synthesis and communication of relevant information about school social work theory and practice. Three credit hours.

SOWK 7395 Addictions Treatment
This course is intended to introduce the dynamic topic of addiction and its treatment. In this course, these topics will be investigated and discussed: the foundations and assessment of addiction, substances commonly abused, special populations (i.e. behavioral addictions, addictions in the workplace), and treatments for addictions. Three credit hours.

SOWK 7396 Crisis Problem Solving
This course is an advanced generalist practice course designed to teach practice skills and model techniques for assessment, initial intervention, and follow up with individuals, families, and groups/organizations. The emphasis is on expanding knowledge of theoretical concepts and evidence-based treatment strategies aimed at crisis situations. Students will learn initial safety assessment models as well as intervention techniques with children, families, and communities. Three credit hours.

SOWK 7397 Domestic Violence
This course will provide an overview of conceptual models of violence, current research, and social work practice issues used in addressing domestic violence (violence between intimates). While the primary focus will be on violence against women and the physical and sexual abuse of children, populations that are disproportionately affected by interpersonal violence, there will also be discussion of elder abuse, dating violence, interpersonal violence with LGBT populations, and prevention. Three credit hours.

SOWK 7398 Psychodynamic Psychotherapy
Psychodynamic Psychotherapy provides an overview of Freudian drive/structural theory and the central concepts of early psychoanalytic thinking. The basic principles of psychodynamic psychotherapy will then be covered with a review of how certain concepts proposed by Freud have been adhered to, changed, modified, or abandoned altogether. The theoretical basis for dynamic therapy will then be covered along with a brief overview of current schools of psychodynamic theory. An evidence-based ego-psycholoical/object relations approach to assessment and treatment of neurotic, borderline, and psychotic disorders is then be presented. The ego psychological component will address the assessment of person-in-situation factors; issues related to adaptation; and ego functions, including defense mechanisms that span the range of mature-higher/lower level-psychotic. Particular emphasis will be placed on the object relations component of this theory, focusing on the developmental trajectory of object relations and specific fixation points that result in character pathology, organized at a psychotic, borderline or neurotic level. Three credit hours.

SOWK 7403 Social Work Internship I
Prerequisites or corequisites: SOWK 7301, 7330, 7350, 7390. (SOWK 7403 and 7404 must be completed consecutively, in the same agency setting). Supervised direct service activities; practical experience in applying foundation theory, skills; developing integrated social work practice skills with individuals, families, groups, communities; focus on developing professional relationships, initial intervention stages with client systems; requires 240 clock hours of placement. Graded credit/no credit. Four credit hours.

SOWK 7404 Social Work Internship II
Prerequisite: SOWK 7403. Prerequisites or corequisites: SOWK 7302, 7331, 7370, 7391. (SOWK 7403 and 7404 must be completed consecutively, in the same agency setting). Continuation of SOWK 7403; requires 240 clock hours of placement. Graded credit/no credit. Four credit hours.

SOWK 7603 Advanced Standing Social Work Internship
Prerequisites: Advanced Standing admission. Pre or co- requisites: SOWK 7370, 7391, 7316 and 7316 co-requisites. Supervised direct service activities; practical experience in applying foundation theory, skills; developing integrated work practice skills with individuals, families, groups, communities, organizations; focus an professional relationships, initial intervention stages with clients systems; requires 240 clock hours of placement. Six credit hours.

SOWK 7803 Social Work Block Internship
Co-requisites: SOWK 7301, 7302, 7330, 7331, 7350, 7370, 7390, 7391. 480 hours of supervised social work practice in applying foundation year theory, skills and social work values and ethics. Students practice engagement, interviewing, assessment planning, basic intervention, evaluation and termination skills at all systems levels. Eight credit hours.

SOWK 8159 Evaluation Research II
Prerequisite: SOWK 8259. Evaluation research design, data collection, data analysis, and reporting; the political contexts of needs assessment and program evaluation. One credit hour.

SOWK 8191 Guided Study
Prerequisites: consent of instructor, advisor, program director. Available, with a two-hour social work elective, to students from other graduate programs who wish to take social work electives but require three credit hours for their own program. Directed individual study arranged by student. One credit hour.

SOWK 8204 Crisis Problem Solving
Prerequisite: completion of the foundation year graduate program. Theoretical concepts, treatment strategies for crisis situations; focus on planned brief treatment of individuals or families in stressful situations using cognitive or problem- solving approaches. Two credit hours.

SOWK 8205 Group Treatment
Prerequisite: graduate standing. Group leadership to provide therapeutic intervention to members; leading groups with different needs, such as mental illness, antisocial behavior, addictions, neurosis, behavior changes. Two credit hours.

SOWK 8206 Psychodrama
Prerequisite: completion of the foundation year graduate program. Technique originated by J.L. Moreno; personality makeup, interpersonal relationships, emotional problems, decisions, conflicts are explored by dramatic enactment in a positive, supportive setting. Two credit hours.

SOWK 8207 Child Behavior and Treatment
Prerequisite: completion of the foundation year graduate program. Psychosexual, social, cognitive, physical development of children; major diagnostic categories; treatment approaches reviewed, evaluated for appropriateness according to individual child, family environment needs. Two credit hours.

SOWK 8208 Child Abuse and Treatment
Prerequisite: completion of the foundation year graduate program. Variables in child maltreatment; physical, psychological, emotional, social implications; social work methodologies; role of multi-disciplinary teams. Two credit hours.

SOWK 8209 Community Social Work
Prerequisite: graduate standing. Social context, practice parameters of community social work; emphasis on organizational analysis, problem identification, community organization strategies for social change and institution building, leadership development, community research. Two credit hours.

SOWK 8211 Social Work Practice with Older Adults
Prerequisite: graduate standing. Biopsychosocial/cultural approach to aging; includes demographic, attitudinal aspects; impact of race, gender, class, ethnicity; health, mental health issues; assessment factors; long-term care continuum; roles of families; special policy issues; social work approaches. Two credit hours.

SOWK 8213 Supervision
Prerequisite: graduate standing. Purpose, functions, processes; emphasis on beginning-level interactional skills. Two credit hours.

SOWK 8230 Evidence-based Social Work Practice in Adult Mental Health
Prerequisite: graduate standing. Evidence-based Social Work Practice in Adult Mental Health builds on Assessment & Differential Diagnosis and provides knowledge of evidence-based practice approaches for adult clients who have a DSM- IV-TR diagnostic condition. This course will cover those psychiatric disorders commonly encountered in social work practice: anxiety, personality, mood, substance use, and psychotic disorders. Emphasis is placed on cultural and social aspects of mental health and issues important to populations at risk. An ecological and bio-psychosocial perspective is utilized to develop assessment and treatment strategies that are evidence-based and consistent with cultural and other issues related to diversity. The course will explore mental health care as it is delivered in a variety of settings: outpatient versus inpatient, residential and day treatment, acute versus long term, and private practice versus the community mental health setting. The course will enlighten the student to the range of issues, ethical and otherwise, that impact this population: legal, economic, relational, medical, and educational. Two credit hours.

SOWK 8234 Personality Theory
Prerequisite: graduate standing. Several frames of reference on personality theory; includes historical antecedents, major concepts, applicability to social work practice, limitations of various theories. Two credit hours.

SOWK 8235 Spirituality in Social Work
Prerequisite: graduate standing. This course provides the general framework for dealing with spiritually sensitive social work situations. It provides the students with the content for dealing with the matters of the human spirit. Two credit hours.

SOWK 8236 Human Sexuality and Social Work Practice
Prerequisite: completion of the foundation year graduate program. This course provides students with a multidisciplinary approach to human sexuality. Students will have the opportunity to explore views experiences, values, and beliefs and how these impact on the clients which they serve along with the societal and cultural issues that may impact upon clients of social work and other mental health professionals. Two credit hours.

SOWK 8238 Women & Family Issues in Social Work
This course will examine women’s and family issues in social welfare with particular attention to the social service delivery system, significant historical and contemporary federal/state policy issues, and the social work profession. Several special populations of women will be considered, including poor women, survivors of violence, and older women. Specific topics to be addressed in this course are work/family issues, welfare and poverty, violence against women, and caregiving. Two credit hours.

SOWK 8242 Global Perspective in Social Work
Prerequisite: graduate standing. Building a first-year domestic social policy course, the purpose of this course is to expose students to a variety of global social issues related to social welfare and social development. Using film as the medium students will engage in critical thinking and analysis of social welfare issues, and explore how political, economic, cultural, religious, historical and environmental factors impact social welfare policies and the delivery of human services in different regions of the world. This course is useful for those who have had previous international experience and/or those who are interested in international social work and are looking for a forum in which such experiences and interests can be processed in the context of existing theoretical frameworks and models of social welfare service delivery. Two credit hours.

SOWK 8251 Juvenile Delinquency
Prerequisite: graduate standing. Forms of unlawful behavior during adolescence, early adulthood; major theories of delinquent behavior, including control, anomie, subcultural, interactionalist, labeling, classical; major theories of justice, including classical, just desserts, deterrence, rehabilitation models. Two credit hours.

SOWK 8253 Law and Social Work
Prerequisite: graduate standing. Areas of law that shape, regulate the social work profession; contributions, significance of legal issues to client services, the profession; legal policies that may control, restrict clients’ lives. Two credit hours.

SOWK 8259 Evaluation Research I
Prerequisite: SOWK 7370. Management and community practice applied to the methods of social work practice evaluation through needs assessment and program evaluation. Builds on foundations provided in SOWK 7370, extending into macro-practice research at the organizational and community level. Emphasizes empowerment evaluation as a mechanism to foster improvement and self-determination. A theories-of- change approach is used to guide evaluation. Two credit hours.

SOWK 8271 Research Project
Prerequisites: SOWK 7370 and 8371 or consent of instructor. Steps in carrying out a research project; all phases of research methodology. Two credit hours.

SOWK 8292 Guided Study
Prerequisites: consent of instructor, approval of course outline by school’s Curriculum Committee. Directed individual study arranged by student. Two credit hours.

SOWK 8301 Advanced Directed Practice I
Prerequisite: concentration year standing. Developing biopsychosocial framework for assessment, intervention; focus on careful assessment, diagnosis prior to clinical interventions. Three credit hours.

SOWK 8302 Advanced Directed Practice II
Prerequisite: SOWK 8301 or MFT-GC admission. This course provides knowledge and skills about social work practice with couples and families. It studies the major schools of family theory, methods for practice with families, and systemic links between family, culture, and society. Three credit hours.

SOWK 8303 Couples Treatment
Prerequisite: completion of the Foundation Year of the MSW or similar MA program and admission to the MFT certificate program. Couples Treatment is a course designed to apply principles of family therapy theory to work with couples. Students are challenged to consider differences and similarities between individual, family, and couples treatment. Cognitive Behavioral Couples Therapy, Object Relations Couples Therapy, Brief Strategic Couples Therapy, and Narrative Couples Therapy will provide the theoretical foundation for examining issues couples face. Issues related to same-sex couples, domestic violence, infidelity, and addiction will be examined as part of the course. Three credit hours.

SOWK 8305 Management and Community Practice I
Prerequisite: concentration year standing. Management, administration in social work, human services; includes decision making, leadership styles; basic tasks, roles, skills of managers; management processes such as financial, human resource management. Three credit hours.

SOWK 8306 Management and Community Practice II
Prerequisite: SOWK 8305. Continuation of SOWK 8305; use of competing values framework (a meta-theoretical model) to integrate management skills of boundary-spanning, human relations, coordinating, directing. Three credit hours.

SOWK 8308 Ethical Issues in Couple and Family Therapy
Prerequisite: admission to the MSW program or the MFT-GC program. Designed to provide knowledge necessary for understanding legal and ethical issues that confront practice. The legal responsibilities of the family therapist are examined with emphasis on personal and professional development. Ethical issues related to diversity are considered within the context of couple and family therapy. Three credit hours.

SOWK 8309 Intergenerational Family Therapy
Prerequisite: admission to the MSW program or the MFT-GC program. Provides students with knowledge on family functioning across generations based on Murray Bowen’s theories. Application of theories through the use of family assessment and intervention techniques. Three credit hours.

SOWK 8310 Sociology of the Family
Prerequisite: admission to the MSW program or the MFT-GC program. Course will focus on the family as an institution responsive to social and economic change. It will provide a knowledge base in institutional and historical aspects of the family. The course is required for the Marriage and Family Certificate. Three credit hours.

SOWK 8311 Family Life Cycle
Prerequisite: graduate standing. Focus on the theoretical underpinnings of the many and varied life cycles families experience. Particular emphasis will be placed on cultural influences and populations at risk. Three credit hours.

SOWK 8312 Play Therapy
Prerequisite: concentration year standing, MFT-GC, program or instructor permission. This course provides introductory instruction in history, theories, and applications of play therapy consistent with Association of Play Therapy (APT) requirements. Students are expected to have successfully completed course work in child development (e.g., Advanced Direct Practices I) Special issues affecting oppressed children will be addressed, including: parent-child problems, divorce, abuse/neglect /abandonment, etc. Diversity issues will also be explored as key components of competent play therapy practice. Students will be challenged to apply what they are learning about work with children in mock clinical sessions. This three-hour graduate level semester course, according to APA, is consistent with APT requirements for instruction, and provides 67.5 Continuing Education (CE) hours toward the mandatory 150 required for RPT certification. Three credit hours.

SOWK 8320 Family Mediation
Focuses on social work practice in family mediation. It will equip students with the skills and information needed to meet requirements of the Arkansas Dispute Resolution Commission for their family mediation roster. Three credit hours.

SOWK 8340 Aging and Social Policy II
Health needs of the elderly and health care systems that address them; mechanisms for health care delivery and for financing institutional community-based care; effects for elderly of reform proposals. Three credit hours.

SOWK 8346 Family in Late Life
Prerequisite: graduate standing. Family life of the elderly; includes late-life marital relationships; widowhood, living alone; relations with children, grandchildren, siblings, other kin; alternative, innovative lifestyles; neglect, abuse of the elderly; demographic, structural changes in family, society that affect these matters; core concept is the family as a natural support system for the elderly; its potential and limitations in a context of community support networks. Three credit hours.

SOWK 8371 Statistics for Social Work
Prerequisite: SOWK 7370 or special permission from Instructor. Statistics, their use in analyzing data; probability, inferential, decision-making, basic statistics; includes central tendencies, variability, data distributions, bivariate, multivariate procedures; critiquing articles in social work journals. Three credit hours.

SOWK 8390 Advanced Direct Practice III
Prerequisite: SOWK 8301. Corequisite: SOWK 8302. This course provides knowledge about social work practice with groups with an emphasis on the application of group theory to many forms of groups in a variety of settings. This course will include content on supervision of workers learning group practice skills. Three credit hours.

SOWK 8503 Advanced Direct Practice Internship I
Prerequisite: concentration year standing. Pre or corequisite: SOWK 8301. (SOWK 8503 and 8504 must be completed consecutively, in the same agency setting). Hands-on experience with individuals, groups, families; emphasis on applying concepts from SOWK 8301; requires 360 clock hours of internship placement. Graded credit/no credit. Five credit hours.

SOWK 8504 Advanced Direct Practice Internship II
Prerequisites: Social Work 8301, 8503. Pre or corequisite: SOWK 8302. (Social Work 8503 and 8504 must be completed consecutively, in the same agency setting). Continuation of Social Work 8503; focus on integrating knowledge in preparation for professional practice; requires 360 clock hours of placement. Graded credit/no credit. Five credit hours.

SOWK 8507 Internship I Management & Community Practice
Prerequisite: concentration year standing. Corequisite: SOWK 8305. (SOWK 8507 and 8508 must be completed consecutively, in the same agency setting). Experience working in a social service agency in an administrative capacity; requires 360 clock hours of placement. Graded credit/no credit. Five credit hours.

SOWK 8508 Internship II Management & Community Practice
Prerequisites: SOWK 8305, 8507. Corequisite: SOWK 8306, 8159. (SOWK 8507 and 8508 must be completed consecutively and in the same agency setting). Continuation of SOWK 8507; focus on integrating knowledge, assuming responsibility for administrative functions, including planning, evaluation. Graded credit/no credit. Five credit hours.


MEET OUR COORDINATORS

Photo of Dr. Catherine Crisp

Catherine Crisp, Ph.D., LCSW

MSW Coordinator
Associate Professor

Photo of Elizabeth Fowler.

Elizabeth Fowler, MSW

MSW Field Coordinator


STUDENT RESOURCES AND SUPPORT

Two women studying in the Ottenheimer Library.

The profession of social work offers some wonderful resources to social workers and other interested parties. Please view the sections below to learn more about those resources. Some of the resources below may redirect you to another website.

Student Handbooks


The MSW Handbook is revised every year and provides information about UA Little Rock and the MSW program policies and procedures. Click the link below to download the handbook as a PDF file.

Current Handbook

2018-2019 MSW Student Handbook (PDF)
UA Little Rock Graduate School Handbook

Previous Handbooks

2017-2018 MSW Student Handbook (PDF)
2016-2017 MSW Student Handbook (PDF)

Helpful Links

Student Support Services


Advising
Academic Success Center provides the opportunity for students to develop their skills in a way that promotes advance achievement, administration, and demonstrates self-coordinated learning through astounding support services. Students will be assigned a MSW Faculty advisor who will advise them for the remainder of their coursework while in the program. The MSW Coordinator will notify the student and advisor of these assignments during the summer.

Academic Success Center
Academic Success Center provides the opportunity for students to develop their skills in a way that promotes advance achievement, administration, and demonstrates self-coordinated learning through astounding support services.

Blackboard Student Support
Blackboard Student Support offers a variety of resources for students taking classes online at UA Little Rock including tutorials, links to helpful resources, and answers to students’ frequently asked questions. Our support staff will try to respond to your help request within 24 hours, excluding weekends and U.S. holidays.

Career Services
Our Career Services program provides one-on-one guidance support for career planning, professional development and job searching. We help our students recognize and explore career opportunities/options, distinguish and research prospective company openings that prompt your definitive profession objective, and develop resumes, introductory letters, and savvy interviewing techniques.

Community Connection Center
Community, Careers, and Extended Education (CCEE) promotes career building and learning that will enhance the lives at UA Little Rock. We encourage group networking, promote experiential learning to increase student involvement, and enhance collaborative faculty and student research.

Counseling Services
Counseling Services aims to give the best individual and group advising/counseling assistance to students experiencing mental, social, or learning complications.

Disability Resource Services
Our Disability Resource provides accessible services to people with disabilities so they may thrive and actively participate within their communities. We strive to work proactively with the campus on accessibility issues by developing convenient course design and accommodating all disability complications.

Financial Aid
We don’t want you to miss out on financial assistance opportunities! The Office of Financial Aid is dedicated to help you qualify and fund your education. Our staff will help you find the right scholarships, grants, and student loans just for you. Schedule a meeting with one of our financial advisors today!

Green Dot initiative
The Green Dot initiative is all about creating a safe and positive campus environment through the power of community and we believe that any behavior‚ choice‚ word‚ or attitude has the capacity to promote the safety and well-being for all of us. The Green Dot Initiative communicates zero tolerance for violence and we are dedicated to making sure your experience at UA Little Rock is a danger-free zone.

Health Services
Health Services aims to improve the health and wellness of the university community by providing all-inclusive, quality health care and wellness promotion services. We believe in pushing aside barriers and hope to rekindle close relationships through our wellness building system.

Mathematics Assistance Center
The Mathematics Assistance Center (MAC) is an excellent place for students to study and receive exceptional guidance from experienced tutors. Needing help with an assignment at the last minute? No worries! We provide walk-in tutoring services in a friendly and relaxing environment for your needs!

Ottenheimer Library
The Ottenheimer Library provides students the access to FREE and useful research databases and sources including but not limited to scholarly articles, journals, and essays. Wanting to check out a book or dvd? Come on down!

Writing Center
The University Writing Center (UWC) provides quality feedback about your writing, problem-solving strategies for your writing, and assistance with academic technology through both face-to-face and virtual writing consultations. If you are having trouble completing that essay for class or starting that rough draft, we are here to aid you. Our services are free and accessible to all colleges, so don’t be shy! You have the “write” to be here.

FIELD MANUALS AND FORMS

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For Students

 

Middle-aged caucasian woman with short brown hair smiling at the camera as she leans against a brick wall.

For Field Liaisons

 

African American male in business attire smiling at the camera.

For Field Instructors

 


FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

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If you’ve got questions, we have answers! Below you’ll find an array of frequently asked questions from individuals just like you. Don’t see the answer to your question? Use the form at the bottom of the page to speak with one of the School of Social Work advisors.


Future Student FAQ

Am I eligible to apply for admission to the MSW program?

Applicants for either the part-time and full-time MSW programs must have a bachelor’s degree and a cumulative GPA of 3.0 to be regularly admitted. On occasion, an applicant may be conditionally admitted if this grade-point requirement is almost but not quite met. Students must have a cumulative GPA of 2.75 or a GPA of 3.0 in their last 60 hours to be considered for a conditional admission. A conditional admission requires the student to demonstrate academic ability by maintaining a 3.0 GPA in core courses for the first twelve semester hours of enrollment. Failure to do so will lead to dismissal by the Graduate School.

What is advanced standing? Am I eligible to apply for the advanced-standing program?

This program allows qualified students who have earned a bachelor’s degree in social work within the last five years from an institution accredited by the Council on Social Work Education to complete the MSW degree in a shorter, concentrated program. This program may be completed on either a full-time (12 months) or part-time (21 months) basis. Admission to the advanced-standing program is competitive. In addition to completing a BSW from a CSWE-accredited BSW program no more than five years before your application, you must also have earned a GPA of 3.5 in the last 60 hours of the program to be eligible for advanced standing.

Do I have to have a BSW degree in order to get accepted into the MSW program?

No. In order to be considered for admission to the MSW program, you must have a bachelor’s degree with a liberal arts perspective from an accredited college or university. The UA Little Rock MSW program does not require that an applicant have a BSW degree in order to be considered for admission.

How do I apply to UA Little Rock’s MSW program?

Applications for the MSW program at UA Little Rock are available online. You should submit all application forms as directed.

When is the application due?

We do accept applications all year, although most core courses begin in the fall. Applicants are encouraged to apply early. Only completed applications are eligible for review.

Although we do admit students in the spring semester, most core courses begin in the fall and most of the curriculum is carefully sequenced. Therefore, students admitted in the spring can only enroll on a part-time basis.
Application Due Dates

  • Part-time spring (all students): November 1
  • Full-time Advanced Standing: February 1
  • All students (full-time, part-time, online) fall: February 1
If I start the program in the spring, what classes would I be able to take?

Students who start the program in the spring can only begin the program on a part-time basis and take a maximum of six credits. Students cannot begin their foundation internship until the following fall term. If you start the program in the spring, you will not graduate any sooner.

Do I really have to take the GRE or the MAT?

Yes, you do. The only students who might not be required take the GRE or MAT are students who have already completed a graduate program with an above average GPA. You may seek a waiver of this requirement by submitting a request, in writing, to the MSW Admissions Coordinator. Please include full information about the graduate school attended, your cumulative graduate GPA, and the degree you earned. Waivers are not solely granted on having completed a graduate program.

What score do I need to make on the GRE or the MAT?

The UA Little Rock School of Social Work does not have a fixed score requirement. In general, scores at or above the 50th percentile on all three sections of the GRE would be considered competitive. A 50th percentile would be considered a competitive score on the MAT. The standardized test is one very important factor considered as part of your application. You will not be reviewed solely on your ability to take a standardized test, but the admission committee does look closely at your scores. Keep in mind that MSW graduates are required to pass licensure exams in order to practice social work in Arkansas. If you have a low GPA and a high GRE or MAT score, that suggests you have the analytical skills necessary in order to complete a master’s degree. Your MAT/GRE scores are only good for five years from the application deadline.

Where and when can I take the GRE or MAT?

Information about the GRE
Information about the MAT

GRE testing locations in Arkansas:

Arkadelphia
Prometric Testing Center-Henderson State
1100 Henderson St. Box 7650
Capinger Airway Science Ctr. 135
Arkadelphia, AR
870-230-5470

Fayetteville
U of A Testing Services
713 Hotz Hall
Fayetteville, AR
479-575-2743

Fort Smith
Prometric Testing Center
2409 S. 56th Street, Suite 117
Ft. Smith, AR
479-484-0702

Jonesboro
ASU Testing Center
106 Caraway North
Room 403, Chickasaw Bldg.
Jonesboro, AR
870-972-2038

Little Rock
Prometric Testing Center
1405 North Pierce Street
Forest Heights Bldg., Suite 203
Little Rock, AR
501-663-8280

You may contact the UA Little Rock Testing Services to schedule the MAT at 501-569-3198. UA Little Rock Testing Services is located in Ross Hall, Rm. 409, http://ualr.edu/testing/. Official scores generally take up to two weeks to be received by the graduate school. You can take these tests as many times as you want.

What help can I get to pay for grad school?

Applicants for financial aid must be fully admitted (regular status) at UA Little Rock as degree-seeking students to be eligible for any form of financial aid. Graduate students are not eligible for the Pell Grant, Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant, or Arkansas Student Assistance Grant.

Graduate Assistantships
Graduate assistantships are available through graduate programs or departments and the Graduate School. To be qualified, students must be fully admitted to a graduate program with a minimum course load of nine graduate hours, and be recommended by the program coordinator. Assistantships usually include a tuition scholarship, a stipend of at least $3,100 (half-time), and a 10-hour-per-week (also half-time) duty assignment for the nine-month academic year. Duty assignments vary, but most involve either administrative or research responsibilities. Whenever possible, assignments contribute to the student’s field of study. Information about how to apply for a position will be sent to students who eligible for a graduate assistant position prior to the start of each fall semester. Based on the information provided, the unit/department will contact you if they are looking for a GA with your qualifications. Recipients are notified during the summer, prior to the beginning of fall classes.

TAMS (Tuition Assistance for Minority Students)
Please inquire at the Graduate School and visit the Teaching Enhancements Affecting Minority Students (TEAMS) website.

University Scholarships
University scholarships are awarded for both full- and part-time students through the UA Little Rock Office of Development and various UA Little Rock schools and colleges. UA Little Rock Scholarship Applications should be submitted to the Office of Development by March 1. In order to learn more about UA Little Rock Scholarships, contact the Office of Development, 501-569-3194 or http://ualr.edu/development/.

The UA Little Rock School of Social Work has several scholarships available, though they are reserved for students entering their final year in the program. We announce these scholarships and applicable deadlines during April of each school year. If you are interested in tuition deferment, the option of paying tuition in monthly installments is available by contacting the UA Little Rock Cashier’s office, at 501-569-3043.

How do I apply for financial aid?

Go to http://www.fafsa.ed.gov/ This site answers questions about the process of applying for financial aid. The School of Social Work is unable to answer questions concerning financial aid. Please visit the Office of Admissions and Financial Aid on the web at http://ualr.edu/admissions/.

Is there someone I can talk to about the MSW program?

If you have thoroughly familiarized yourself with the online materials and you still have questions, you may call 501-569-3240. You can also e-mail your questions to socialwork@ualr.edu.

When will I find out if I have been admitted?

You will be informed in writing of the admissions committee’s decision. Remember that your application must be complete before you can be considered for admission!

How will I know if my application is complete?

You can determine what has been received by the graduate school by checking the UA Little Rock website. You can also contact the graduate school by calling 501-569-8663 to see if your official transcripts, record of immunizations, graduate school online application, and test scores have been received. You can contact the School of Social Work by calling 501-569-3240 or by emailing socialwork@ualr.edu to see if your application file is complete. It is recommended (but not required) that you submit the information required by the School of Social Work in one packet.

If I choose the part-time program, can I get all my classes in the evening or on Saturday?

There are several classes offered in the evenings but we do not consistently offer weekend classes. Registration is first-come, first-serve. Part-time students or students traveling long distances do not get to register early or get to enroll ahead of other students in the program.

How many hours do I have to take to be considered full time in the MSW program?

In order to be considered full-time in the MSW program, a student must carry a minimum of twelve credit hours per semester.

How long will it take me to complete the MSW program?

For full-time students, it takes four semesters (two academic years) to complete the MSW program. Part-time students will spend six semesters (three academic years), and advanced standing students can complete the program in either a full-time (12 months—summer, fall, and spring semesters) or part-time (21 months—two academic years). You must complete your MSW in four years.

What will my degree plan (class schedule) look like as I move through the MSW program?

The sequence of your core social work classes is set for you based on either being full-time or part-time in the MSW program. The classes you take will also depend on your concentration (ADP or MCP). Your final degree plan will be formulated with your advisor at your first advising session, but you can get an idea of a basic degree plan by viewing our MSW Basic Degree Plans (Word).

I already have a master’s degree. How do I request transfer of credits?

Only applicants from other CSWE accredited graduate social work programs will be considered for transfer admission. The applicant must have an overall GPA of at least 3.0 in graduate work. No grade lower than a B will be accepted for credit. We require an official statement from the former school indicating the student is in good standing. The concentration year (28 hours) of graduate study must be completed at UA Little Rock. Only one graduate level course from the UA Little Rock MSW program, other departments at UA Little Rock, or other universities taken prior to the student’s beginning of core MSW courses at UA Little Rock may be considered for transfer of elective credits. Students must submit a request for transfer of credit at or before the time of their enrollment. The request should include a cover letter, which discusses the content of the course (other than UA Little Rock MSW courses) and its relevance to social work. A copy of the course outline shall be attached. This request should be addressed to the chair of the curriculum committee. After the curriculum committee accepts requests for transfer of credit, the application for transfer of credit is forwarded to the Dean of the Graduate School who then approves and posts to transcript. Transfer grades are not computed as part of a student’s UA Little Rock cumulative GPA.

How much do books generally cost each semester for a full-time student?

Books generally cost approximately $350-500 per semester.

Do I need to schedule an interview?

Personal interviews are not a routine part of the application process. If the admission committee has questions or concerns they would like to address with you, you may be called to arrange for a personal interview.

Can graduate students live on campus?

Yes, anyone enrolled at UA Little Rock can live on campus, given the limitations of available space. There are residence halls, apartments, rental houses, and UA Little Rock owned off-campus housing available. Go to http://ualr.edu/housing/ for more information and an application.

How much is graduate school tuition, and will it cost more for me to come to school at UA Little Rock if I don’t live in Arkansas?

Yes, UA Little Rock does charge out-of-state tuition fees. Graduate nonresident tuition is almost twice the cost of graduate tuition for residents. For additional prices and updated listings, please check the Tuition and Fees page at the UA Little Rock Bursar’s Website. You can also use UA Little Rock’s tuition and fee estimator found at https://boss.ualr.edu/pls/prod/twestfee.P_EstimateFeesGradschool.

The UA Little Rock School of Social Work is part of the College of Education and Health Professions. You will need this information in order to estimate tuition and fees.

Current Students FAQ

After I’m admitted, when do I register?

You must be advised before you register for classes. Information about advising will be sent out with your admissions letter or shortly thereafter. Students accepted for the Fall are also required to attend an all day new student orientation before classes begin. Students admitted for the Summer or Spring are assigned faculty advisors at admission and will be advised and oriented to the program by their advisor.

Once I’ve been advised, when and how do I register?

You will need to log into BOSS using your student ID (T Number). Click on the Student Services link. From the Student Services tab, you may click on Registration and follow the instructions. All MSW students register on the same day and time to ensure fairness in class availability. You may also use BOSS to view your student account and to make sure there are no holds or registration flags which might prevent you from registering. You can also view this video for information about how to register for classes.

When I graduate from UA Little Rock with an MSW, am I qualified to practice social work or do I have to have a license?

You must obtain a license through the Arkansas Social Work Licensing Board or from the state where you plan to practice. Upon successful completion of the licensing examination, you may obtain a license and be eligible to practice social work. For more information, contact the Arkansas Licensing Board at 501-372-5071 or take a look at their web site at http://www.arkansas.gov/swlb.

Is a “C” grade considered a passing grade for graduate course work?

A grade of “C” is passing; however, a grade point average of 3.0 in all social work courses is required for a student to remain in good standing. Thus, it’s necessary to earn an “A” for each “C” to meet the minimum GPA of 3.0. Students cannot graduate without a GPA of 3.0 or above. Students who fall below a 3.0 GPA are placed on probation and can be dismissed from the MSW program if they fail to raise their GPA over the next twelve semester hours.

Do I have to do a thesis in order to graduate from UA Little Rock’s MSW program?

No, the UA Little Rock MSW program does not require students to complete a thesis.

Do I have to check my UA Little Rock e-mail account while I am student in the program?

Yes. All official e-mail correspondence from the University to you will be sent to your UA Little Rock e-mail account. UA Little Rock requires the use of e-mail while you are a student in the program. Students are expected to check their email several times each week and to correspond with UA Little Rock faculty staff with their @uar.edu email address

How do I access my UA Little Rock e-mail account?

UA Little Rock offers free e-mail accounts to all students. Go to http://mail.ualr.edu/ for instructions. E-mail accounts will not be active until you have registered for classes.

When do I apply for my internship?

One of the field coordinators will email you an internship application before you are scheduled to enroll in internship.

Where do I park?

UA Little Rock students are required to register their vehicles and display parking permits. You can register one vehicle for free. For more information, visit http://ualr.edu/safety. You may also park in the parking garage, located across the street from the Donaghey Student Center. There is no requirement for a parking permit but you must have a dollar in change in order to get out of the garage. There is also parking available at the University Center parking area (by Big Lots on Asher and University). Please be aware that this parking lot also contains retail parking and UA Little Rock students may not park in these designated areas.

How do I get my student ID card?

The student ID card is a photo ID issued after students register for classes.. This card is necessary when you check books out of the library, use facilities at the Donaghey Student Fitness and Aquatic Center, attend some special activities and athletic events, take advantage of student discounts where offered, and conduct other University business. Your ID may be issued in the Donaghey Student Center in the office beside the aquatic center. The card is free, but if you must replace a lost one, there will be a fee of $10.

I have a disability. I will need accommodations in the classroom. What should I do?

The School of Social Work supports students with disabilities. If you have a disability that requires assistance in the classroom, you should first contact UA Little Rock Disability Resource Center to register for their services and request accommodations.

I have trouble with writing. Is there anyone who can assist me?

The Writing Center offers one-on-one assistance. If you know you struggle in this area, it’s important for you to use this resource. Visit http://ualr.edu/writingcenter/, or call 501-569-8311. The Writing Center is located in SUB 116.

What is my personal identification number (PIN)?

The Graduate School will send you a personal identification number. You will need this number to register for classes. Your PIN is different from your student ID number. Your PIN should be kept private so that no one can change your registration. If you have questions about your PIN, more information can be found on the Graduate School website. The School of Social Work cannot look it up for you or replace it.

Internship FAQ

What is an internship?

An internship is supervised, guided experiential learning in an agency setting. It is an academic course focusing on the process of interaction with client systems and socialization into the social work profession.

What is expected of me as a student?

In general, you should be open to learning and growing, willing to look at and grapple with your own biases and values, and willing to take responsibility for your own learning. In specific, you will be expected to meet the learning objectives for the internship and demonstrate application of the required skills.

How many internships will I have?

You will have two internships: a foundation internship in the first half of the MSW curriculum and a concentration internship in the final academic year. Both internships take place in the same setting over two consecutive semesters. By the time of graduation, a regular student will have logged 1136 practice hours and an advanced-standing student will have logged 960 hours.

What is the difference between a foundation and concentration internship?

The foundation internship is the grounding for core social work knowledge, values, and skills where you learn to engage, assess, plan, intervene, evaluate, and terminate at all systems levels (individuals, families, groups, communities, and organizations). The concentration internship takes you more in depth with different systems levels—advanced direct practice for those who want to concentrate in working with individuals, groups, and families and management and community practice for those who want to work with communities and organizations.

What is the difference between advanced-standing and regular internships?

The advanced standing internship is offered only during the summer and is a total of 240 practice hours. It is a compressed version of the regular foundation year internship, but it is for advanced standing students only.

When will I do my internship?

The requirement for doing an internship is either to be enrolled in the required foundation year courses in social work methods or to have completed these courses before beginning the internship. Our preferred model is that social work methods courses and internships be taken concurrently. This gives the student more time to integrate knowledge and skills and to practice what is being learned in the classroom. However, we are also committed to teaching those who can only attend graduate school part-time because of distance, employment, or other circumstances. For these students we also offer internships during the summer based upon student needs and instructor availability.

How many hours is the internship?

The foundation year internship is a total of 416 hours. This is generally scheduled for 16 hours per week (Thursdays and Fridays) over the course of two semesters or during the summer at 40 hours per week for a 12-week period. The concentration year internship is 720 hours and is scheduled for 24 hours per week (generally Wednesday through Friday) over the course of two semesters.

How many credit hours is the internship?

The foundation internship is in two courses each of which are four credit hours. Advanced standing internship is also in two courses, each of which are three credit hours. The concentration year internship is two courses, each of which are five credit hours. Thus, eighteen of the sixty credit hours required for the degree are for internships if you are a regular student and sixteen of the forty-three required hours if you are an advanced-standing student.

What is a typical internship?

There is no typical internship. The only thing that is consistent across sites is the availability of client systems and social work supervision. Internships are found in all kinds of human and community service settings—mental health centers, hospitals and clinics, domestic violence shelters, prisons, client-advocacy and policy-advocacy organizations, child and family welfare agencies, schools, aging centers, residential facilities, and more As people are diverse, so are the internships.

Are internships paid?

More paid internships are available for the concentration year than the foundation year but both are rare and students should not expect a paid internship. Students may request a paid internship and are matched to the agency based on educational fit and financial need.

Can I choose or find my own internship?

We are always interested in developing new internship sites and students who are aware of potential agencies or instructors are asked to notify the MSW internship coordinator. (Contact information is at the bottom of this page.) The School will then assess the educational appropriateness of the site. However, students are not to contact agencies directly and make their own arrangements for an internship. The internship coordinators arrange all placements. Every year, we hold an internship fair and students then submit an internship application that includes a request for their preferences their internship

Can I do my internship at my job?

It is possible if your place of employment is in the human services field, if the agency is willing and able to incorporate our educational objectives into work duties or make other arrangements to have them met, and if there is an LMSW or LCSW who is willing to instruct you and who does not currently supervise your work. If you’re interested in doing an internship where you’re employed, you should bring this to the attention of the internship coordinator.

How far will I have to travel to my internship?

We are committed to serving students all over Arkansas and we will try to keep you as close to home as possible. In some cases, travel may be required because of the availability of approved sites and instructors.

I work and need flexible hours. Can I do my internship evenings and weekends?

Time spent in the internship must be supervised by your field instructor. Most social workers work 8-5 p.m., Monday through Friday. Please make note that we do not have the ability to accommodate students who can only complete their internships in the evenings and on weekends.

I have worked in the field. Can my experience count toward the internship?

No. Our accrediting body, the Council on Social Work Education, clearly prohibits this. Your experience will be valuable in applying new theories and practice skills.

What is the process to obtain an internship?

If you are admitted as a part-time student, you will start with only your coursework and your advisor will help you draft a plan for your remaining coursework and for the timing of your internships. If you are admitted full-time, you will receive an application for the foundation internship shortly after you are accepted to the program.

The MSW internship coordinator will assess your experience and goals and make a tentative match with an instructor and agency. You and the potential instructor then interview each other to ensure goodness of fit. Student who are admitted prior to the internship fair in the spring as well as all part-time and concentration year students are encouraged to attend the annual career and internship fair in the spring semester.

As a student, you will learn about the agencies and meet potential instructors. From there, you submit an application that includes your preferences for agencies at which to complete your internship.. Again, you and a potential instructor will meet and interview one another before the internship is confirmed. Internship application forms are on the web site.

Do I need a car?

Many social work activities (such as outreach, home visits, meetings with collaborating agencies, and community care) require transportation. If transportation is difficult for you, please notify the MSW Internship Coordinator in your internship application.

What is the difference between an internship field instructor, faculty liaison, faculty advisor, and MSW internship coordinator?

An internship field instructor is a LMSW with two years experience or a LCSW who is employed at an agency and volunteers to teach and mentor our students in accordance with our educational objectives and guidelines. A faculty liaison is a member of the faculty who is available to both the student and internship instructor for consultation.

The faculty liaison is the bridge between the school and the agency and monitors the student’s learning. The liaison visits the agency at least twice during the semester, meeting with both student and instructor, and is responsible for the final internship grade in consultation with the internship field instructor. A faculty advisor is a member of the faculty who advises students on all academic matters. The internship coordinator is the administrative designee for the faculty who coordinates student internships, training and in general ensures that the internship process meets academic expectations.

How does UA Little Rock choose internship instructors?

We are blessed with a community of excellent social workers who are committed to teaching and giving back to their profession. We look for licensed social workers, preferably LCSWs, who have the time and the interest in becoming an educator within their agencies. We provide instructors with initial training, manuals, and ongoing continuing education and consultation. We include these instructors in School planning processes and on School committees.

What if my agency is not what I expect or does not meet my learning goals?

We hope that you and your internship instructor will have discussed basic expectations and goals at the initial interview and before the School confirms the internship. After you have started the internship, concerns should be directly discussed with your internship instructor. If the concerns are not resolved, you should contact your faculty liaison. As a student, you can consult at any time with your faculty liaison about problem solving in connection with the internship.

What if I drop the internship after the first semester?

An internship must never be dropped before discussing it with the instructor, liaison, and advisor. “Disappearing” from the agency may result in dismissal from the School.

NEWS & EVENTS


FINANCING YOUR EDUCATION

Extreme close-up of several silver coins.

The sections below provide a variety of options on financing your graduate school education. Please visit the official site for the Admissions and Financial Aid Office for more information.

Financial Aid


Tuition and Fees
The most current, up to date tuition rates at UALR.

FAFSA-Free Application for Federal Student Aid
Comprehensive information and applications for federal student loan programs and assistance can be found at this website.

Graduate Assistantships
There are a small number of graduate assistantships for first-year students in the MSW program. These ten-hour graduate assistantships include modest pay and a significant break on tuition. An email will be sent to all eligible students when information about funding for these positions is available, typically sometime in July of each year.

Scholarships


Selected scholarships are available for graduate level social work students entering their final (concentration) year in the program. Information regarding deadlines for scholarship applications will be sent out by the department to all students in the late spring. Scholarship amounts depend upon a variety of funding sources, and thus individual scholarship amounts vary each year. All students entering their concentration year are encouraged to apply for scholarships for which they qualify.

General Scholarships

The general scholarship application, instructions, contact information, and departmental links can be found here. The School of Social Work offers several departmental scholarships specifically for graduate students through the College of Education and Health Professions. Applicants will hear directly from the department regarding scholarship results, usually in May.


AARP Chapter 34 Scholarship

The scholarship recipient will be chosen by the AARP Chapter. Scholarship amount will vary based on funding and will be awarded for the fall semester of each year.
Qualifications include:

  • A strong desire to work with the aging population
  • A second year internship working with the elderly
  • Demonstration of financial need
  • A grade point average of 3.25 or higher

The recipient will be required to make a presentation during his/her second year internship to the AARP chapter sponsoring this scholarship, sharing with that group his/her experience working with the aging.


Dr. Nancy Jane Harm Endowed Scholarship

The School of Social Work will award this scholarship to a full-time student entering their last year of graduate studies in the MSW program. Preference for this scholarship will be given to a single parent who demonstrates academic excellence and financial need. Applications will be reviewed and the funds will be made available to the recipient in the fall of student’s second year in the MSW Program, assuming funds are available.

Requirements for the scholarship include:

  • A statement of financial need.
  • A 3.25 or higher GPA in all MSW courses.
  • Preference given to single parents.

Students should submit:

  1. A statement describing their current financial situation and how this scholarship will assist them in pursuing their MSW degree;
  2. A written statement which describes the student’s qualifications, experiences, interests, and goals for this scholarship; and
  3. A letter of reference from a faculty member in the School of Social Work.

On receipt of the scholarship, the recipient must write a thank you letter to the
donor.

Questions should be directed to Dr. Crisp at clcrisp@ualr.edu. Deadline for application is February 1, 2018.


Dr. Robert E. Elliott Memorial Scholarship

The Robert E. Elliott Memorial Scholarship shall honor the memory of Dr. Robert E. Elliott for the benefit of the School of Social Work. This scholarship is available to a second year MSW student as funds are available.
Qualifications include:

  • MSW student who is interested in pursuing or furthering a graduate degree in Social Work with an emphasis in mental health
  • Academic accomplishment
  • Financial need

The recipient will attend at least one board meeting of the Robert Elliott Foundation and participate in three of the major annual events of the foundation.


Gisela Spieker Scholarship

Gisela Spieker, former Dean of the School of Social Work at UA Little Rock, will award an annual scholarship to a second year student in the Graduate School of Social Work. The award will be made in the fall semester of the concentration year as funds are available.

Requirements for the scholarship include:

  • A statement of financial need.
  • A 3.25 or higher GPA in all MSW courses.
  • MSW student who is interested in working with family violence and/or substance abuse
  • A planned second year internship in an agency working with family violence and/or alcoholism

Students should submit:

  1. statement describing their current financial situation and how this scholarship will assist them in pursuing their MSW degree;
  2. written statement which describes the student’s qualifications, experiences, interests, and goals for this scholarship; and
  3. A letter of reference from a faculty member in the School of Social Work.

On receipt of the scholarship, the recipient must write a thank you letter to the
donor.

Questions should be directed to Dr. Crisp at clcrisp@ualr.edu. Deadline for application is February 1, 2018.


Rebecca Ward Scholarship

The School of Social Work will award this scholarship to a student enrolled in the second year of the MSW program who demonstrates academic excellence and financial need. Applications will be reviewed and the funds will be made available to the recipient in the fall of student’s second year in the MSW Program, assuming funds are available.

Requirements for the scholarship include:

  • A statement of financial need.
  • A 3.25 or higher GPA in all MSW courses.
  • Expected enrollment in the second year of the MSW program.

Students should submit:

  1. statement describing their current financial situation and how this scholarship will assist them in pursuing their MSW degree;
  2. written statement which describes the student’s qualifications, experiences, interests, and goals for this scholarship; and
  3. A letter of reference from a faculty member in the School of Social Work.

On receipt of the scholarship, the recipient must write a thank you letter to the
donor.

Questions should be directed to Dr. Crisp at clcrisp@ualr.edu. Deadline for application is February 1, 2018.

Internships

Internships

Internships are an integral part of the curriculum design. Students will have acquired a total of 1200 practice hours by graduation (1000 hours for advanced standing students). Through contact with clients and client systems in a helping relationship, students develop the requisite skills for social work practice.

Full-time students are expected to complete the internship concurrently with other course work. Part-time students are expected to complete field work in the fall and spring of their 2nd part time year. Students must have completed or be in the process of completing all foundation requirements when doing internship placement.

Students must petition the MSW Practice Committee in order to complete a summer block internship or other internship time periods outside of the standard time period allotted in the degree plan. All internships are under the supervision of field faculty, and all field agencies are approved in advance by the MSW Internship Coordinator and the appropriate curriculum committees.

Students often find their foundation year and concentration year internships to be the most significant, productive, and memorable component of their social work education. In the context of these internships, students can consciously apply and experience practice knowledge and wisdom. UA Little Rock uses the agency-based instruction model, where trained and committed practicing MSWs volunteer their knowledge and skills to teach future social workers.

The agencies with whom we partner are committed to social work education and help support it by making available their staff as internship instructors and by providing space, equipment, and learning opportunities for students.

Settings for internships include a variety of human and community service organizations, public, nonprofit, and for-profit, large and small, whose work encompasses such areas as health and mental health care, child welfare, education, aging services, hospice care, substance abuse services, services to people with disabilities, and public policy advocacy.

Agencies are approved on the basis of their ability to further the educational objectives of the program. Selection criteria include adequacy of the learning environment, availability of client populations, opportunity to work with community resources, and opportunity for participation with staff in the agencies’ organizational processes.

Academic Credit for Life/Professional Experience

Academic credit is not given for life experience and/or previous work experience, in whole or in part, in lieu of the field internship or of courses in the professional foundation areas specified in the Curriculum Policy Statement.



HAVE QUESTIONS? ASK AN ADVISOR.

We’re always happy to answer any questions you might have about our available programs. Use the form below to submit your inquiries to the School of Social Work advisors or call us at 501-569-3240.

  • Please let us know if you are a high school student considering attending UA Little Rock, a transfer student, a current student at UA Little Rock, etc.
  • If you are currently attending UA Little Rock, please include your T# in your correspondence with us.
    Which program(s) would you like more information about?
  • What semester term do you have questions about?
  • What year do you have questions about?
  • What questions do you have for our social work coordinators?